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Syllabus for 2009
Focus: Nanotechnology

Sunday, July 5 - University Square Hall, 91 University Avenue, Newark, NJ

4:00–5:30 PM - Registration and Check-In

5:30 - 8:30 PM: Paul Robeson Campus Center, 350 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd, Newark, NJ
Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
Dr. Anna Stubblefield (Chair, Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark) 
Michael Stephens (Senior Director, Global Ethics & Compliance, Merck)
Introduction to the Merck Summer Institute on Bioethics.
Pizza Supper.
Film: “Fantastic Voyage”, followed by a discussion of ethical issues in nanotechnology raised by the film

 

Monday, July 6 - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 241

9:00–9:30 AM - Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
A short tour of nanoscience and nanotechnology and some of the attendant ethical issues.

9:30 - 10:30 AM - Dr. Huixin He (Chemistry, Rutgers University-Newark)
A world-renowned nanoscientist, Professor He will discuss the work she has done in creating nanomaterials that transport anti-cancer drugs into cancer cells without harming healthy cells.

10:30 - Noon - Dr. Ken Richman (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences)
Introduction to ethics and ethical reasoning with examples of ethical problems that arise in nanotechnology.

Noon–1:00PM - Lunch
  
1:00–2:00 PM - Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
Critical thinking workshop I.
Introduction to the fundamental tool for critically assessing arguments.

2:00–3:00 PM - Dr. Trip McCrossin (Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
The philosophical issues involving in defining personal identity and how these are important in assessing nanotechnological interventions in the human brain.

3:00–4:00 PM - Break-out groups: Students will be assigned to groups and will begin to consider six different ethical issues arising in the context of nanotechnology that will form the basis for their final presentations on Saturday. Students will be assisted by Dr. Ray Williams (Business School, Rutgers University-Newark) and Mr. Gustavo Rodriguez (Philosophy Department, Rutgers University-Newark).

4:00–5:00 PM - Dana Library - Electronic Classroom,, Room 021 - Dr. Robert Nahory (Rutgers University-Newark). Ann Watkins (Rutgers University Libraries) Introduction to Information Literacy: using library resources for projects.

5:00–6:30 PM - Dinner

6:30–8:00 PM - Rutgers Law School, 123 Washington Street, Baker Court Room 125
Interning with law students to prepare for Thursday’s mock trial

 

Tuesday, July 7 - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 241

9:00–11:00AM - Jazz: Presentation by staff members Ed Berger, Vincent Pelote and April Grier of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University on types of jazz music and its relation to everyday life.

11:00–Noon - Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark) and Dr. Ray Williams (Rutgers University Business School and Baruch College, CUNY)
Critical thinking workshop II.
How to convert moral dilemmas into arguments in order to solve them. More on critical assessment of arguments, especially in a legal context, with a focus on burden of proof and standards of evidence

Noon–1:00 PM - Lunch

1:00 PM–2:00 PM - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 371A
Dr. Gordon Purves (Department of Philosophy, University of South Carolina)
What is risk and how is it measured? In particular, how do we measure the risk of new applications of nanoscience and nanotechnology? What are precautionary principles and how effective are they in thinking about sensible public policy for nanotechnology?

2:00–3:00 PM - Break-out groups. Students will work in groups on the problems of risk analysis and their ethical aspects.

3:00–4:00 PM -Dana Library - Electronic Classroom,, Room 021 - Dr. Robert Nahory. Ann Watkins. Computer lab. Compile notes for the day and work on projects.

4:00–5:00 PM - Rutgers Law School, 123 Washington Street, Robert N. Wilentz Appellate Courtroom 122
Interning with law students to prepare for Thursday’s mock trial.

5:00–8:30 PM - Dinner.
Dr. Karina Schaefer (Department of Biology, Rutgers University-Newark)
Dinner, film: “The Day After Tomorrow,” and discussion. Dr. Schaefer is a well-known ecologist, who will talk about the dangers to the environment of ignoring risks.

 

Wednesday, July 8 - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 241

9:00–10:00 AM - Dr. Barry Komisaruk (Board of Governors’ Professor of Psychology and Associate Dean of the Graduate School, Rutgers–Newark).
Could nanorobots surgically alter the basic structure of the human nervous system? What would such alterations mean for the quality of one’s mental life?

10:00–11:00 AM - Dr. Arif Rana (Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Rutgers University-Newark)
The uses of advanced nano-microscopy in detecting breast cancer (and other diseases). .

11:00–Noon - Mr. Wayne Gilman (Professional radiobroadcast journalist, the voice of Air America for 30 years) and Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
cal thinking workshop III.
How does media filter and doctor scientific and political information for the general public? How does this filtering affect how the general public understands science? Mr. Gilman will discuss his first-hand experiences in how the public mind is shaped and controlled by the media

Noon–1:00 PM - Lunch

1:00–2:00 PM - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 371A
Dr. David Perlman (University of Pennsylvania and Eclipse Educational Technologies)
Ethical Decision Making

2:00–3:00 PM - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 371A
Dr. Mohammed Alsiadi (Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Rutgers University
The scientific, cultural and philosophical legacy of Islam and Arab, especially innovations in scientific miniaturization.

3:00–4:00 PM - Break-out groups. Students will work in groups on the ethical issues they will present on Saturday.

4:00–5:00 PM -Dana Library - Electronic Classroom, Room 021 - Dr. Robert Nahory (Rutgers University-Newark). Ann Watkins (Rutgers University Libraries) Students will compile notes for the day and work on their projects;

5:00–6:30 PM - Dinner

6:30–8:00 PM - Rutgers Law School, 123 Washington Street, Robert N. Wilentz Appellate Courtroom 122
Interning with law students to prepare for Thursday’s mock trial.

 

Thursday, July 9 - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 241

9:00–10:00 AM - Dr. Elena Galioppi (Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University-Newark)
will talk about her groundbreaking work in nanoscience and in developing new nanomaterials..

10:00–11:00 AM - Samad Beeler (UMDNJ), Gustavo Rodriguez (Philosophy major, Rutgers University-Newark)
Various ethical issues that arise in medical uses of nanotechnology

11:00–11:30 AM - Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
The infection game—how small particles that can harbor disease can easily elude human visual detection shows students that nanotechnology applications can be invisible, but happening right in front of their eyes

11:30–Noon - Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
Critical thinking workshop IV.
More on critical assessment of arguments, especially in a legal context, with a focus on burden of proof and standards of evidence, in preparation for the afternoon mock trial.

Noon–1:00 PM - Lunch

1:00–3:30 PM - Rutgers Law School, 123 Washington Street, Baker Court Room 125 - A mock trial concerning a corporation respected by the community that conducts nanotechnology experiments that run amok and produce toxic nanomaterials that threaten the ecology of the region. Vice Provost Marcia Brown, Professor Alicia Guichard, Toni Kelich and several students at Rutgers Law School will help prepare students for, and conduct, the trial.

3:30–4:00 PM - Break-out groups. What do you think of the mock trial? What could have been done to improve the argument of the plaintiff? Of the accused?

4:00–5:00 PM  Dana Library - Electronic Classroom, Room 021- Dr. Robert Nahory. Ann Watkins. Computer lab. Students compile notes of the day and work on their projects.

5:00–6:30 PM - Dinner

6:30–9:00 PM - Work-out with the men’s and women’s Rutgers-Newark basketball teams.

 

Friday, July 10 - Smith Hall, 101 Warren Street, Room 241


9:00–11:00 AM - Dr. Alex Rodriguez (Biology, Rutgers University-Newark)
A tour of his biology lab in the new Life Sciences Building - Professor Rodriguez will show how a modern laboratory microscope is used in the study of cellular processes. Students will have a hands-on opportunity to carry out direct observations of cell activity using this microscope.

11:00–Noon - Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark) and Jennifer Smith (Director, Corporate and Foundation Relations, Office of the Chancellor, Rutgers University-Newark) Critical thinking workshop V.
How to use the critical thinking tools students have learned in the past week in application to problems in how to live, what to do with one’s life and finding what is important and what is most valuable for one’s life plans

Noon–1:00 PM - Lunch

1:00–5:00 PM - Break-out groups.
Students will work in groups on the ethical issues they will present on Saturday

5:00 –6:30 PM - Dinner

6:30–8:30 PM - Students continue work on their projects for the Gala Dinner Saturday

 

Saturday, July 11 - Paul Robeson Campus Center, 350 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd, Room 255-257

11:00 – 4:00 PM - Gala Dinner for students of the Institute and their parents.
Introduction by Dr. Jeff Buechner (Institute Director; Philosophy, Rutgers University–Newark)
Comments on the Program: Michael Stephens, Senior Director, Global Ethics & Compliance, Merck
Student groups will present their ethics projects.
Award ceremony and farewell

 


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