A Bibliography of
Johnsonian Studies,
1986–

Jack Lynch

Introduction

Search for a (single) word:

  1. John L. Abbott, “Defining the Johnsonian Canon: Authority, Intuition, and the Uses of Evidence,” Modern Language Studies 18, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 89–98.
  2. John L. Abbott, “Dr. Johnson and the Society,” in The Virtuoso Tribe of Arts and Sciences: Studies in the Eighteenth-Century Work and Membership of the London Society of Arts, ed. D. G. C. Allan and John L. Abbott (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1992), pp. 7–17.
  3. J. L. Abbott and D. G. C. Allan, “‘Compassion and Horror in Every Humane Mind’: Samuel Johnson, the Society of Arts, and Eighteenth Century Prostitution,” Journal of the Royal Society of the Arts 136 (1988): 749–54, 827–32. Reprinted in The Virtuoso Tribe of Arts and Sciences: Studies in the Eighteenth-Century Work and Membership of the London Society of Arts, ed. D. G. C. Allan and John L. Abbott (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1992), pp. 18–37.
  4. Henry Abelove, “John Wesley's Plagiarism of Samuel Johnson and Its Contemporary Reception,” Huntington Library Quarterly 59, no. 1 (1997): 73–79.
  5. Rima Abunasser, “The Commerce of Knowledge in Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” in Global Economies, Cultural Currencies of the Eighteenth Century< ed. Michael Rotenberg-Schwartz and Tara Czechowski (New York: AMS Press, 2012), pp. 215–29.
  6. Chris Ackerley, “‘Human Wishes’: Samuel Beckett and Johnson: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture of 2005,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 9 (Aug. 2007): 11–28.
    Not seen.
  7. James Eli Adams, “The Economies of Authorship: Imagination and Trade in Johnson's Dryden,” SEL 30, no. 3 (Summer 1990): 467–86.
  8. Katherine H. Adams, “A Critic Formed: Samuel Johnson's Apprenticeship with Irene 1736–1749,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 183–200.
  9. Denise Adamucci, “The Final Decision: Lover or Friends?” M.A. Thesis, Arizona State Univ. 1993. Not seen.
  10. M. D. Aeschliman, “The Good Man Speaking Well: Samuel Johnson,” National Review 37 (11 Jan. 1985): 49–52.
  11. Saleem Ahmed, “Dr. Johnson's Rasselas: The Choice of Life,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 43–50.
  12. Robert John Alexander, “‘Empty Sounds’: Johnson's Dictionary and the Limit of Language,” chapter 3 of “The Diversions of History: A Nonphenomenal Approach to Eighteenth-Century Linguistic Thought,” Dissertation Abstracts 59, no. 8 (Feb. 1999): 2995A. McMaster Univ. Not seen.
  13. Muhsin Jassim Ali, “Rasselas as a Colonial Discourse,” Central Institute of English & Foreign Languages Bulletin 8, no. 1 (June 1996): 47–60.
  14. Paul Alkon, “Johnson and Time Criticism,” Modern Philology 85, no. 4 (May 1988): 543–57.
  15. [Add to item 11/1:10] Paul Alkon and Robert Folkenflik, Samuel Johnson: Pictures and Words: Papers Presented at a Clark Library Seminar, 23 October 1982 (Los Angeles: Andrews Clark Memorial Library, 1985). Reviews:
  16. Denna Allen, “How the TV Play of Johnson and Boswell Is Set to Spark an Outcry North of the Border,” The Mail on Sunday, 10 Oct. 1993, pp. 48–49.
  17. Julia Allen, “‘Hateful Practices’ and ‘Horrid Operations’: Johnson's Views on Vivisection,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1993): 20–29.
  18. Julia Allen, Samuel Johnson's Menagerie: The Beastly Lives of Exotic Quadrupeds in the Eighteenth Century (Banham, Norwich, Norfolk: Erskine Press, 2002). Pp. x + 179. Not seen.
  19. Edward Allhusen, ed., Fopdoodle and Salmagundi: Words and Meanings from Dr Samuel Johnson's Dictionary That Time Forgot: Words and Meanings from Samuel Johnson's Dictionary That Time Forgot (Moretonhampstead, Devon: Old House Books, 2007). Pp. 208.
    Not seen.
    Reviews:
  20. Brenda Ameter, “Samuel Johnson's View of America: A Moral Judgment, Based on Conscience, Not Compromise,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 71–77.
  21. David Amigoni, “‘Borrowing Gargantua's Mouth’: Biography, Bakhtin and Grotesque Discourse — James Boswell, Thomas Carlyle and Leslie Stephen on Samuel Johnson,” in Victorian Culture and the Idea of the Grotesque, ed. Colin Trodd, Paul Barlow, and David Amigoni (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999), pp. 21–36.
  22. Sadrul Amir, “Some Aspects of Johnson as a Critic,” Dhaka University Studies Part A 42, no. 1 (1985): 40–58.
  23. Hugh Amory, Dreams of a Poet Doomed at Last to Wake a Lexicographer (Cambridge, Mass.: Houghton Library, 1986). Pp. 8. 250 copies printed for the Johnsonians.
  24. David R. Anderson, “Johnson and the Problem of Religious Verse,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 41–57.
  25. David R. Anderson, “Classroom Texts: The Teacher, the Anthology,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 3–7.
  26. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb, eds., Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson (New York: MLA, 1993). Pp. x + 152. Reviews:
  27. Eric Anderson, “Robert Anderson: Johnson's Other Scottish Biographer,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1992): 1–7.
  28. Christopher Andreae, “Exaggerate, Said Dr. Johnson,” The Christian Science Monitor, 31 Oct. 1985, p. 34.
  29. Edward G. Andrew, “Samuel Johnson and the Question of Enlightenment in England,” chapter 8 (pp. 154–69) of Patrons of Enlightenment (Toronto: Univ. of Toronto Press, 2006).
    Not seen.
  30. [Anon.], A Short-Title Catalog of Eighteenth Century Editions of Dr. Samuel Johnson's “Dictionary” in Special Collections, the Library of the School of Library and Information Science, the University of Western Ontario (London, Ont.: Univ. of Western Ontario, 1985).
  31. [Anon.], “Boswell Find,” The Times, 6 June 1985, p. 5h. Two newly discovered letters — one by Johnson, one by Boswell — in Canberra National Library.
  32. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson by Mrs. Thrale: The ‘Anecdotes’ of Mrs. Piozzi in Their Original Form,” The New Yorker 61 (30 Dec. 1985): 80.
  33. [Anon.], “Boswell on Johnson on Conversation,” The Christian Science Monitor, 3 June 1986, p. 42.
  34. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson's Dog,” The Economist, 26 Dec. 1987, p. 7.
  35. [Anon.], “Samuel Johnson's Tics,” FDA Consumer 22 (Sept. 1988): 29.
  36. [Anon.], Samuel Johnson, Writer, 1709–1784 (Falls Church, Va.: Landmark Films, 1988). Videocassette.
  37. [Anon.], Samuel Johnson, Author for All Seasons: An Exhibition of Manuscripts & Books from the Library of Loren & Frances Rothschild Held at the Doheny Memorial Library, University of Southern California (Pacific Palisades and Los Angeles: Rasselas Press & the USC Fine Arts Press, 1988). Pp. 33.
  38. [Anon.], “Guests Outside Dr Samuel Johnson's House at 17 Gough Square, off Fleet Street, for its Reopening,” The Independent, 24 May 1990, p. 6.
  39. [Anon.], “Down into Egypt,” Philosophy 65, no. 254 (Oct. 1990): 395–97. Editorial.
  40. [Anon.], “Dr Johnson Relic May Be Replaced,” The Independent, 11 March 1991, p. 2.
  41. [Anon.], “‘The Mantle of Johnson Descends on Gisbourne’: Samuel Johnson and Some Controversies of the 1820's,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1991): 29–33.
  42. [Anon.], “The Gobblies at the Gate,” The Economist 325, no. 7786 (21 Nov. 1992): 104.
  43. [Anon.], “John Wilkes, Esq., and Dr. Samuel Johnson,” The Atlantic 271, no. 3 (March 1993): 87.
  44. [Anon.], “Boxing: Dr Johnson's Plea Rings Out over Another Lull in Boxing,” The Sunday Telegraph, 10 Oct. 1993, p. 5.
  45. [Anon.], “On the Road with Johnson & Boswell & Co.,” Telegraph Magazine The Daily Telegraph, 11 Sept. 1993, p. 36.
  46. [Anon.], “Samuel Johnson, Man of the Theater,” New York 28, no. 19 (8 May 1995): 83.
  47. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson's Regard for Truth,” The Herald (Glasgow), 17 Feb. 1996, p. 14.
  48. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson's Zeal for Gaelic,” The Herald (Glasgow), 26 Feb. 1996, p. 12.
  49. [Anon.], “Johnson's Bestiary,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1997): 24–29. Humorous piece on Dictionary definitions on animals.
  50. [Anon.], “An Original ‘Fame’ School,” Leicester Mercury, 16 June 1998, p. 4. Brief profile of the Dixie Grammar School in Market Bosworth.
  51. [Anon.], Johnson, Boswell, and Their Circle: Books and Manuscripts, Including New Acquisitions from a Private Collection (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1999). Pp. 88. A sale catalogue.
  52. [Anon.], “Johnson beyond Boswell,” Wilson Quarterly 23, no. 3 (Summer 1999): 119–20. A review of Stephen Miller's “Why Read Samuel Johnson?”
  53. [Anon.], “Dryden, Chesterfield, and Johnson's ‘Celebrated Letter’: A Case of Compound Allusion,” Notes & Queries 48, no. 4 (2001): 413.
  54. [Anon.], “Tour the Western Isles: Two Erudite Friends Set Off to See the Once Remote Hebrides,” British Heritage 22, no. 3 (April–May 2001): 52–58. Not seen.
  55. [Anon.], “Regulating Language,” The Hindu, 3 Oct. 2004, pp. 47–48.
  56. Kelly Anspaugh, “Traveling to the Lighthouse with Woolf and Johnson,” Virginia Woolf Miscellany 45 (Spring 1995): 4–5.
  57. Jonathan Arac, “The Media of Sublimity: Johnson and Lamb on King Lear,” Studies in Romanticism 26, no. 2 (Summer 1987): 209–20.
  58. Jonathan Arac, “Truth,” PMLA 115, no. 5 (Oct. 2000): 1085–88.
  59. Helen Ashmore, introd., Frances Reynolds and Samuel Johnson: A Keepsake to Mark the 286th Birthday of Samuel Johnson and the 49th Annual Dinner of the Johnsonians (Cambridge: Houghton Library, 1995). Pp. 28. At Harvard University, 15 Sept. 1995.
  60. Helen Ashmore, “‘Do Not, My Love, Burn Your Papers’: Samuel Johnson and Frances Reynolds: A New Document,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 165–94.
  61. James Atlas, “Dr. Johnson's Open House,” House & Garden 159 (Dec. 1987): 12.
  62. James Atlas, “Holmes on the Case,” The New Yorker 70, no. 29 (19 Sept. 1994): 57–65. On Holmes's Dr. Johnson and Mr. Savage.
  63. James Atlas, “Over the Sea to Skye,” Condé Nast Traveler 31 (June 1996): 120–29.
  64. Tim Aurthur and Steven Calt, “Opium and Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 85–99.
    SJ was addicted to medicinal opium, which produced rather than alleviated many of his symptoms.
  65. I. Avin, “Driven to Distinguish: Samuel Johnson's Lexicographic Turn of Mind: A Psychocritical Study,” doctoral dissertation, Univ. of St. Andrews, 1997. Not seen.
  66. Amittai F. Aviram, “Poetic Envoi: Epistle of Mrs. Frances Burney to Dr. Samuel Johnson Regarding the Most Unfortunate Mr. Christopher Smart,” in Christopher Smart and the Enlightenment, ed. Clement Hawes (New York: St. Martin's, 1999), pp. 283–87.
  67. Amad Awwad, “Samuel Johnson and the Issue of Holy Matrimony,” M.A. Thesis, California State University, Hayward, 1986. Not seen.
  68. Bernard Bailyn, “Does a Freeborn Englishman Have a Right to Emigrate?” American Heritage 37 (1986): 24–31.
  69. Beryl Bainbridge, According to Queeney (London: Little, Brown; New York: Carroll & Graf, 2001). Pp. 224. Novel told from Queeney Thrale's point of view. Reviews:
  70. Beryl Bainbridge, “Remembering Sam,” The New Rambler, E:4 (2000–1): 24–26.
  71. Beryl Bainbridge, “Words Count: Samuel Johnson's Dictionary Was Published 250 Years Ago This Month,” The Guardian, 2 April 2005, p. 5.
  72. Paul Baines, “‘Putting a Book out of Place’: Johnson, Ossian and the Highland Tour,” Durham University Journal 53, no. 2 (July 1992): 235–48.
  73. Paul Baines, “Chatterton and Johnson: Authority and Filitation in the 1770s,” in Thomas Chatterton and Romantic Culture, ed. Nick Groom (New York: St. Martin's, 1999), pp. 172–87.
  74. Paul Baines, The House of Forgery in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999), chapter 5 (“Johnson, Ossian, and the Highland Tour”), pp. 103–24); chapter 6 (“The Many Lives of Doctor Dodd”), pp. 125–50.
  75. John D. Baird, “‘A Louse and a Flea’: A Source for Johnson's Rejoinder,” N&Q 37, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 312.
  76. Russell Baker, “Typical American Noises,” New York Times, 146 (29 March 1997): 19(L).
  77. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and the Classics,” Hellas: A Journal of Poetry and the Humanities 2, no. 2 (Fall 1991): 227–38.
  78. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and Vergil,” Prudentia, 24 (1992): 37–63.
  79. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson's Conglobulating Swallows,” N&Q 41, no. 2 (June 1994): 199–206.
  80. Barry Baldwin, “The Mysterious Letter ‘M’ in Johnson's Diaries,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 131–46.
    A classicist's challenge to Greene's interpretation of the M in Johnson's diaries as a reference to masturbation.
  81. Barry Baldwin, “A Classical Source for Johnson on Augustus and Lord Bute,” N&Q 42, no. 4 (Dec. 1995): 467–68.
  82. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and Petronius,” Petronian Society Newsletter 25 (1995): 14–15.
  83. Barry Baldwin, “Plautus in Johnson: An Unnoticed Quotation,” N&Q 43 (Sept. 1996): 305–6.
  84. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and Lincolnshire,” The New Rambler E:3 (1999–2000): 46–48.
  85. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson & the Pembroke Latin Grace,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 47–48.
  86. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson on Smoking,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 42–44.
  87. Barry Baldwin, “Classic-al Comments,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 45–46.
  88. Barry Baldwin, “Classica Johnsoniana,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 1 (March 2007): 35–40.
    Miscellaneous observations on Johnson's knowledge of the classics.
  89. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson on Philips via Cicero on Lucretius,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 42–43.
    A correction to Lonsdale's note in the Life of J. Philips on Jonson's quotation of Cicero on Lucretius.
  90. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson and ‘The Jests of Hierocles,’” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 40–43.
    On Boswell's attribution of a free translation of “The Jests of Hierocles,” in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1741, to Johnson. G. B. Hill rejected the attribution; Baldwin argues in its favor.
  91. Barry Baldwin “Mrs. Thrale and the Classics,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 44–48.
    A note on Hester Thrale Piozzi's knowledge of classical literature, especially as expressed in Thraliana and The Piozzi Letters.
  92. Laura Bandiera, “Samuel Johnson: The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia, chapter 3 of Settecento e malinconia: saggi di letteratura inglese (Bologna: Patron Editore, 1995), pp. 101–23. In Italian.
  93. A. Banerjee, “Dr. Johnson's Daughter: Jane Austen and Northanger Abbey,” English Studies 71 (April 1990): 113–24.
  94. A. Banerjee, “Johnson's Patron,” TLS ??? (1 June 2007): 17.
    A response to Freeman's “Affection's Eye,” arguing that the Dictionary definitions of patron “are quite unexceptionable.”
  95. J. Hunter Barbour, “Wit, Mirth & Spleen: ‘I Am Willing to Love All Mankind, Except an American,’” Colonial Williamsburg: The Journal of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 22, no. 4 (Winter 2000–1): 84–85.
  96. Michel Baridon, “On the Relation of Ideology to Form in Johnson's Style,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 85–105.
  97. Brooke Ann Barker, “The Representation of Prostitutes in Eighteenth-Century British Literature,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53 (1993): 2377A.
  98. Geoff Barnbrook, “Johnson the Prescriptivist? The Case for the Prosecution,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 91–112.
  99. Geoff Barnbrook, “Usage Notes in Johnson's Dictionary,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 189–201.
  100. Carol Barnett, Elegy: An Epitaph on Claudy Phillips, a Musician (1988). Music by Carol Barnett, with words by Samuel Johnson. Holograph score at New York Public Library.
  101. Louise K. Barnett, “Dr. Johnson's Mother: Maternal Ideology and the Life of Savage,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 304 (1992): 856–59.
  102. Jeffrey Barnouw, “Learning from Experience, or Not: From Chrysippus to Rasselas,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 33 (2004): 313–38.
  103. Elizabeth Barry, “The Long View: Beckett, Johnson, Wordsworth and the Language of Epitaphs,” Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd'hui: An Annual Bilingual Review/Revue Annuelle Bilingue 18 (2007): 47–60.
  104. Joseph F. Bartolomeo, “Johnson, Richardson, and the Audience for Fiction,” N&Q 33, no. 4 (Dec. 1986): 517.
  105. Joseph F. Bartolomeo, A New Species of Criticism: Eighteenth-Century Discourse on the Novel (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1994), chapter 2 (“Cracking Facades of Authority: Richardson, Fielding, and Johnson”), pp. 47–87.
  106. Philip Edward Baruth, “Recognizing the Author-Function: Alternatives to Greene's Black-And-Red Book of Johnson Logia,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 35–59.
  107. Philip Edward Baruth, “Positioning the (Auto)Biographical Self: Ideological Fictions of Self in Boswell, Johnson, and John Bunyan,” Dissertation Abstracts International 54, no. 3 (Sept. 1993): 936A. Univ. of California, Irvine.
  108. Philip Baruth, The Brothers Boswell (New York: Soho Press, 2009). Pp. 336.
    A speculative mystery novel about James Boswell and his murderous brother John, set in 1763, when they come to know Johnson.
    Reviews:
  109. James G. Basker, “Dancing Dogs, Women Preachers and the Myth of Johnson's Misogyny,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 63–90.
  110. James G. Basker, “Scotticisms and the Problem of Cultural Identity in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” Eighteenth-Century Life 15, nos. 1–2 (Feb.–May 1991): 81–95; reprinted in Sociability and Society in Eighteenth-Century Scotland (Edinburgh: Mercat Press, 1993).
  111. James G. Basker, “Resisting Authority; Or, Johnson and the Wizard of Oz,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 28–34.
  112. James G. Basker, “Samuel Johnson and the American Common Reader,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 3–30.
    A survey of Johnson's importance in Colonial American libraries and booksellers' catalogues.
  113. James Basker, “Samuel Johnson and the African-American Reader,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 47–57.
  114. James G. Basker, “Coming of Age in Johnson's England: Adolescence in the Rambler,” in Les Ages de la vie en Grande-Bretagne au XVIIIe siècle, ed. Serge Soupel (Paris: Sorbonne Nouvelle, 1995), pp. 197–212.
  115. James G. Basker, “Dictionary Johnson amidst the Dons of Sidney: A Chapter in Eighteenth-Century Cambridge History,” in Sidney Sussex College Cambridge: Historical Essays in Commemoration of the Quatercentenary, ed. D. E. D. Beales and H. B. Nisbet (Boydell Press, 1996), pp. 131–44.
  116. James G. Basker, “Radical Affinities: Mary Wollstonecraft and Samuel Johnson,” in Tradition in Transition: Women Writers, Marginal Texts, and the Eighteenth-Century Canon, ed. Alvaro Ribeiro and James G. Basker (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), pp. 41–55.
  117. James G. Basker, “An Eighteenth-Century Critique of Eurocentrism: Samuel Johnson and the Plight of Native Americans,” in La Grande-Bretagne et l'Europe des Lumières, ed. Serge Soupel (Paris: Presses de la Sorbonne Nouvelle, 1996), pp. 207–20.
  118. James G. Basker, “Samuel Johnson,” in Britain in the Hanoverian Age 1714–1837, ed. Gerald Newman et al. (New York: Garland, 1997), pp. 378–80.
  119. James G. Basker, “Myth upon Myth: Johnson, Gender, and the Misogyny Question,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 175–87.
  120. James G. Basker, Samuel Johnson in the Mind of Thomas Jefferson: With Thomas Jefferson's Letter to Herbert Croft, 30 October 1798 (New York: privately printed for the Johnsonians, 1999). Pp. 16.
  121. James G. Basker, “‘The Next Insurrection’: Johnson, Race, and Rebellion,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 37–51.
  122. James G. Basker, “Intimations of Abolitionism in 1759: Johnson, Hawkesworth, and Oroonoko,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 47–66.
  123. James G. Basker, “Multicultural Perspectives: Johnson, Race, and Gender,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 64–79.
  124. James G. Basker, “Johnson, Boswell and the Abolition of Slavery,” The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 36–48.
  125. Lionel Basney, “‘His Proper Business’: Johnson's Adjustment to Society,” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 32, no. 3 (Fall 1990): 397–416.
  126. Lionel Basney, “Prudence in the Life of Savage,” ELN 28, no. 2 (Dec. 1990): 17–24.
  127. Lionel Basney, “Narrative and Judgment in the Life of Savage,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 14, no. 2 (Spring 1991): 153–64.
  128. Jonathan Bate, “Johnson and Shakespeare,” The New Rambler C:25 (1985–86), 11–13.
  129. Jonathan Bate, “Johnson, Garrick and Macbeth,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 8–12.
  130. Walter Jackson Bate, A Life of Allegory (Savannah, Armstrong State College, 1995). Videocassettes of the Conrad Aiken Video Lectures Series. Separate parts: “Samuel Johnson's Four Great Themes,” “Samuel Johnson: The Dark Years”; “Johnson, Psychology & English Prose Style”; “Samuel Johnson: The Final Years”; “Boswell.” Not seen.
  131. Walter Jackson Bate, Samuel Johnson, 2nd ed. (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1998). Pp. xxii + 646. Reviews:
  132. James L. Battersby, “Life, Art, and the Lives of the Poets,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 26–56.
  133. James L. Battersby, “The ‘Lame and Impotent’ Conclusion to The Vanity of Human Wishes Reconsidered,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 227–55.
  134. James Battersby, “Samuel Johnson and Jane Austen,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 46–47.
  135. James Battersby, “A Prologue after, not by, Samuel Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 55–58. On an obscene parody of the “Drury Lane Prologue” in a Victorian magazine.
  136. James Battersby, “A Proverbial Candle and Johnson's Candlestick,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 2 (Sept. 2006): 29–39.
  137. Martin C. Battestin, “Dr. Johnson and the Case of Harry Fielding,” in Eighteenth-Century Genre and Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms: Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter, ed. Dennis Todd (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2001), pp. 96–113.
  138. Martin C. Battestin, “The Critique of Freethinking from Swift to Sterne,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction 15, nos. 3–4 (April–July 2003): 341–420.
    On orthodox critiques of religious heresies in a number of 18th-c. authors.
  139. Randy C. Bax, “Linguistic Accommodation: The Correspondence between Samuel Johnson and Hester Lynch Thrale,” Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science Series 4, no. 224 (2002): 9–24. Not seen.
  140. Adam R. Beach, “The Creation of a Classical Language in the Eighteenth Century: Standardizing English, Cultural Imperialism, and the Future of the Literary Canon,” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 43, no. 2 (2001): 117–41.
  141. Lucy Beckett, In the Light of Christ: Writings in the Western Tradition (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2006).
    Not seen.
  142. John Beer, “Coleridge, Wordsworth and Johnson,” Journal of the English Language and Literature (Seoul), 33 (1987): 25–42.
  143. Michele A. Beilman, “Anthropological Particulars: Johnson's Ambivalent Pastoral Dream,” Wascana Review of Contemporary Poetry and Short Fiction 27, no. 1 (Spring 1992): 73–89.
  144. Wendy Laura Belcher, Abyssinia's Samuel Johnson: Ethiopian Thought in the Making of an English Author (New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2012). Pp. x + 285.
    A study of the influence of the Ge'ez literatures of Ethiopia on Samuel Johnson.
  145. Liz Bellamy, Samuel Johnson (Horndon: Northcote, 2005). Pp. xi + 100. Not seen.
  146. Rachel Elizabeth Bennett, “Economies of Ending: Goldsmith, Johnson, and the Purpose of Poetry,” chapter 2 of “The Secret Horrour of the Last: Readers, Authors, and the Production of Ends in the Long Eighteenth Century,” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 5 (Nov. 2001): 1842A. Univ. of Alberta. Not seen.
  147. V. I. Berezkina, “Iz istorii zhanra esse v angliiskoi literature XVIII v.: K probleme istoricheskoi poetiki zhanra,” Filologicheskie Nauki 4 (1991), pp. 49–61. In Russian.
  148. Lisa Berglund, “Learning to Read The Rambler,” Dissertation Abstracts International 56, no. 4 (Oct. 1995): 1363A. University of Virginia.
  149. Lisa Berglund, “Writing to Mr. Rambler: Samuel Johnson and Exemplary Autobiography,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 29 (1999): 241–59.
  150. Lisa Berglund, “Allegory in The Rambler,” Papers on Language and Literature 37, no. 2 (Spring 2001): 147–78.
  151. Lisa Berglund, “‘Look, My Lord, It Comes’: The Approach of Death in the Life of Johnson,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 7 (2002): 239–55.
  152. Lisa Berglund, “What Is Samuel Johnson's Role in Contemporary Fiction?,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 27–31.
  153. Lisa Berglund, “A Lexicon! A Lexicon!” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 11–13.
    A comic song to the tune of Gilbert & Sullivan's “Paradox Trio.”
  154. Lisa Berglund, “‘I Am Lost without My Boswell’: Samuel Johnson and Sherlock Holmes,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 22 (2012): 131–43.
    Berglund teases out the Johnsonian themes in Arthur Conan Doyle's stories.
  155. Gina Berkeley, “Verses after Dr. Johnson,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 64.
  156. Kevin J. Berland, “‘The Air of a Porter’: Lichtenberg and Lavater Test Physiognomy by Looking at Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 219–30.
  157. Kevin Berland, “The Paradise Garden and the Imaginary East: Alterity and Reflexivity in British Oriental Romances,” Eighteenth Century Novel 2 (2002): 137–59.
  158. Carol Ray Berninger, “Across Celtic Borders: Johnson, Boswell, Piozzi, Scott,” Dissertation Abstracts International 54 (1994): 4099A. Drew University. Not seen.
  159. A. M. Berrett, “Francis Barber's Marriage and Children: A Correction,” N&Q 35 (June 1988): 193.
  160. David Bevington, “The Siren Call of Earlier Editorial Practice; or, How Dr. Johnson Failed to Respond Fully to His Own Intuitions about the Principles of Textual Criticism and Editing,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 139–60.
    Although he developed many of the principles of critical editing, Johnson did not use them in his Shakespeare edition, depending instead on Theobald's text.
  161. James Biester, “Samuel Johnson on Letters,” Rhetorica 6, no. 2 (Spring 1988): 145–66.
  162. Andrew Billen, Who Was . . . Sam Johnson: The Wonderful Word Doctor (London: Short Books, 2004). Pp. 93. Biography for children. Reviews:
  163. Mirella Billi, “Johnson's Beauties. The Lexicon of the Aesthetics in the Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 131–50. Not seen.
  164. Anne Bindslev, “‘Introducing Herself into the Chair of Criticism’: Dr. Johnson, Monsieur Voltaire and Mrs. Montagu,” in Proceedings from the Third Nording Conference for English Studies, Hässelby, 25–27 September 1986, ed. Ishrad Lindblad and Magnus Ljung, 2 vols. (Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiskell, 1987), pp. 519–31.
  165. Jeremy Black, “Samuel Johnson, Thoughts on the Late Transactions Respecting Falkland's Islands and the Tory Tradition in Foreign Policy,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 169–83.
  166. Harold Bloom, ed., Modern Critical Interpretations: James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (New York: Chelsea House, 1986). Pp. viii + 160. A collection of previously published essays.
  167. Harold Bloom, ed. Modern Critical Views: Dr. Samuel Johnson and James Boswell (New York: Chelsea House, 1986). A collection of previously published essays. Pp. viii + 280. Reviews:
  168. Harold Bloom, The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1994), pp. 183–202.
  169. Harold Bloom, Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds (New York: Warner Books, 2002), lustre 4 (“Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann”), pp. 166–87.
  170. Harold Bloom, “Samuel Johnson and Goethe,” chapter 5 (pp. 156–89) of Where Shall Wisdom Be Found? (New York: Riverhead Books, 2004).
    Not seen.
  171. Ronald Blythe, ed., The Pleasures of Diaries: Four Centuries of Private Writing (New York: Pantheon Books, 1989). Pp xi + 388. Includes selections from and discussions of Johnson's diaries.
  172. Fredric Bogel, “Johnson and the Role of Authority,” in The New Eighteenth Century: Theory, Politics, English Literature, ed. Felicity Nussbaum and Laura Brown (New York: Methuen, 1987), pp. 189–209. Reviews:
  173. Fredric V. Bogel, The Dream of My Brother: An Essay on Johnson's Authority (Victoria, B.C.: Univ. of Victoria, 1990). Pp. 94. Reviews:
  174. Gary Boire, “‘Wide-wasting Pest’: Social History in The Vanity of Human Wishes,” Eighteenth-Century Life, 12, no. 2 (May 1988): 73–85.
  175. Erik Bond, “Bringing Up Boswell: Drama, Criticism, and the Journals,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 151–76.
  176. Thomas F. Bonnell, “John Bell's Poets of Great Britain: The ‘Little Trifling Edition’ Revisited,” Modern Philology 85, no. 2 (Nov. 1987): 128–52.
  177. Thomas F. Bonnell, “Bookselling and Canon-Making: The Trade Rivalry over the English Poets, 1776–1783,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 19 (1989): 53–69.
  178. Thomas F. Bonnell, “The Jenyns Review: ‘Leibnitian Reasoning’ on Trial,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 92–98.
  179. Thomas F. Bonnell, “Patchwork and Piracy: John Bell's ‘Connected System of Biography’ and the Use of Johnson's Prefaces,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 193–228.
  180. William Brian Booth, “Samuel Johnson and Work,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 11 (May 1991): 3750A. Not seen.
  181. David Borkowski, “(Class)ifying Language: The War of the Word,” Rhetoric Review 21, no. 4 (Oct. 2002): 357–83.
  182. [James Boswell], Boswell's London Journal (Princeton: Films for the Humanities, 1987). One videocassette. Not seen.
  183. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (Ashland, Oregon: Classics on Tape, 1988–90). Read by Jim Killavey. Recording on 24 audio cassettes. Not seen.
  184. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1990). Pp. xvii + 618.
  185. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, ed. and abr. by John Canning (London: Methuen, 1991). Pp. xviii + 366.
  186. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (London: David Campbell, 1992). Pp. xlix + 613.
  187. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, translated (into Hebrew) by Tova Rozen (Jerusalem: Carmel, 1992).
  188. James Boswell, Samuel Johnson's Life and the Most Meaningful Events of His Times (Gloucester: Gloucester Art, 1993).
  189. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson with an introduction by Claude Rawson (New York: Everyman's Library, 1993).
  190. James Boswell, James Boswell's Life of Johnson: An Edition of the Original Manuscript in Four Volumes vol. 1, ed. Marshall Waingrow (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1994); vol. 2, ed. Bruce Redford (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1999). Pp. xxxix + 518; xviii + 303. Reviews:
  191. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson [abridgment] (London: Naxos AudioBooks, Ltd., 1994). Two audio CDs read by Billy Hartman. Not seen.
  192. James Boswell, From the Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D [abridgment] (Edinburgh: Akros, 1995). Pp. 16. Limited edition of 130 numbered copies.
  193. James Boswell, La vida del doctor Samuel Johnson, tr. and abr. by Antonio Dorta, with a preface by Fernando Savater, 2nd ed. (Madrid: Espasa Calpe, 1998). Pp. 265.
  194. James Boswell, Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D., ed. Iain Galbraith (Köln: Konemann, 2000). Pp. 418.
  195. James Boswell, The Correspondence and Other Papers of James Boswell Relating to the Making of the “Life of Johnson,” ed. Marshall Waingrow, corrected and enlarged edition [of item 4/21]. Reviews:
  196. James Boswell, The Essential Boswell: Selections from the Writings of James Boswell, ed. Peter Martin (London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 2003). Pp. 416. Reviews:
  197. James Boswell, Zhizn Semiuelia Dzhonsona: Otryvki iz knigi, s prilozheniem izbrannykh proizvedenii Semiuelia Dzhonsona, trans. Aleksandra Liverganta (Moscow: Tekst, 2003). Pp. 188.
    Russian translation of Boswell's Life (abridged). Not seen.
  198. James Boswell, “Dr. Johnson's Life in Scenes”: A Reproduction of Those Leaves from James Boswell's Manuscript of the “Life” (Houghton fMS Eng 1836) in Which Dr. Johnson Dines with Mr. Wilkes with a foreword by Mary, Viscountess Eccles, and an afterword by Bruce Redford (Cambridge, Mass.: Houghton Library; Lunenburg, Vermont: Stinehour Press, 2003). Printed for the annual meeting of the Johnsonians, to take place 19 September 2003 at Houghton Library in Cambridge, Massachusetts in celebration of Samuel Johnson's 294th birthday. Pp. 32. Not seen.
  199. James Boswell, Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson (Whitefish, Mont.: Kessinger, 2004). Pp. 277. Not seen.
  200. James Boswell, Yuehanxun zhuan, trans. Luojia Luo and Luofu Mo (Beijing: Zhongguo she hui ke xue chu ban she, 2004). Pp. 11 + 1 + 11 + 6 + 4 + 540. Chinese translation of Boswell's Life. Not seen.
  201. James Boswell, An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to That Island, and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli, ed. James T. Boulton and T. O. McLoughlin (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2006). Pp. lii + 250. Reviews:
  202. James Boswell, James Boswell: The Journal of His German and Swiss Travels, 1764, ed. Marlies K. Danziger (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press; New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2008). Pp. liii + 436.
    The first volume of the Yale Research Series of Boswell's journals, corresponding to Pottle's edition of Boswell on the Grand Tour.
    Reviews:
  203. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, ed. David P. Womersley (London: Penguin Books, 2008). Pp. 1408.
    Publisher's blurb: “This new edition collates and corrects the textual inaccuracies of previous versions, returning to the original manuscript in order to present a definitive edition of this landmark text.” Not seen.
    Reviews:
  204. Ann Bowden and William B. Todd, “Scott's Commentary on The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 229–48.
  205. Steven William Bouler, “‘Thunder O'er the Drowsy Pit’: The Performance Historiography of Samuel Johnson's Mahomet and Irene at Drury Lane,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California at Santa Barbara, 2002.
  206. James T. Boulton, “The Wisdom of Samuel Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1997): 11–23.
  207. W. Michael Bourke, “One Dogma and One Innocuous Truth of Relativism: Incommensurability, Indeterminism, and Hans-Georg Gadamer,” M.A. thesis, Simon Fraser Univ., 1996. Not seen.
  208. Toni O'Shaughnessy Bowers, “Maternal Ideology and Matriarchal Authority: British Literature and the Making of Middle-Class Motherhood, 1680–1750,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 9 (March 1992): 3289A. Stanford University. Not seen.
  209. Toni O'Shaughnessy Bowers, “Critical Complicities: Savage Mothers, Johnson's Mother, and the Containment of Maternal Difference,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 115–46.
  210. Gay W. Brack, “Tetty and Samuel Johnson: The Romance and the Reality,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 147–78.
  211. Gay Wilson Brack, “Sir John Hawkins, Biographer of Johnson: A Rhetorical Analysis,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53, no. 3 (Sept. 1992): 815A. Arizona State University. Not seen.
  212. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Epitaph on a Duckling,” Books at Iowa 45 (Nov. 1986): 62–79.
  213. O M Brack, Jr., “Surviving as a Professional Author: The Case of Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler D:2 (1986–87), 19–21.
  214. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson Bicentenary Exhibitions and Catalogues,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 451–65.
  215. O M Brack, Jr., “The Gentleman's Magazine Concealed Printing, and the Texts of Samuel Johnson's Lives of Admiral Robert Blake and Sir Francis Drake,” Studies in Bibliography 40 (1987): 140–46.
  216. O M Brack, Jr., “Johnson's Life of Admiral Blake and the Development of a Biographical Technique,” Modern Philology 85, no. 4 (May 1988): 523–31.
  217. O M Brack, Jr., “Johnson's Use of Sources in the Life of Sir Francis Drake,” Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 42 (1988): 197–215.
  218. O M Brack, Jr., Bred a Bookseller: Samuel Johnson on Vellum Books: A New Essay for The Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California (Mesa, Arizona: Lofgreen's Printing, 1990). Pp. 8.
  219. O M Brack, Jr., “An Edition of Samuel Johnson's Miscellaneous Prose Writings,” The East-Central Intelligencer 4, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 11–13.
  220. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson Edits for the Booksellers: Sir Thomas Browne's ‘Christian Morals’ (1756) and ‘The English Works of Roger Ascham’ (1761),” Library Chronicle of the University of Texas 21, nos. 3–4 (1991), pp. 12–39.
  221. O M Brack, Jr., ed., Samuel Johnson and Thomas Maurice (Privately printed, 1992). Pp. 14. For the Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California, 1991, and the Johnson Society of the Central Region, 1992.
  222. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Preface to Abbé Prevost's Memoirs of a Man of Quality,” Studies in Bibliography 47 (1994): 155–64.
  223. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Translations of Jean Pierre de Crousaz's Examen and Commentaire,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 60–84.
  224. O M Brack, Jr., comp., Samuel Johnson in New Albion: A Descriptive Census of Rare and Useful Johnson Books and Manuscripts and Johnsoniana Now Located in California with an introduction by Loren Rothschild (New York: The Johnsonians; Los Angeles: The Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California, 1997). Pp. 98.
  225. O M Brack, Jr., “Johnson's First Allusion to Mary Queen of Scots,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 51–53.
  226. O M Brack, Jr., “The Harleian Miscellany: Lost Printing of Volume One Found,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 31–35.
  227. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson Revises a Debate,” The Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer 21, no. 3 (Sept. 2007): 1–3.
    SJ made substantive revisions to the debate in the House of Lords of 4 Dec. 1741, enough text to fill four galley sheets, as it went through reprints in the Gentleman's Magazine.
  228. O M Brack, Jr., “The Works of Samuel Johnson and the Canon,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 246–61.
    Not seen???
  229. O M Brack, Jr., Samuel Johnson, Literary Giant of the Eighteenth Century: An Exhibition at the Huntington Library, May 23–September 21, 2009 (Phoenix: Rasselas Press, 2011). Pp. xli + 77.
  230. O M Brack, JR., “Reassessing Sir John Hawkins's The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Some Reflections,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 1–55. <--4/18/14-->
  231. O M Brack, Jr., and Susan Carlile, “Samuel Johnson's Contribution to Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote,” Yale University Library Gazette 77, nos. 3–4 (April 2003): 166–73. Not seen.
  232. O M Brack, Jr., and Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Some Remarks on the Progress of Learning: A New Preface by Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:6 (2002–3): 61–74. Includes the text of the Remarks.
  233. O M Brack, Jr., and Mary Early, “Samuel Johnson's Proposals for the Harleian Miscellany,” Studies in Bibliography 45 (1992): 127–30.
  234. Susan D. Bradley, “Cognitive Subjectivity and the Modern Informal Essay: A Study of Montaigne and Johnson,” M.A. Thesis, Wichita State University, 1994. Not seen.
  235. Geoffrey W. Brand, “A Night with Venus and a Year with Mercury: The Germ Theory in the Eighteenth Century,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 1 (1997): 17–21.
  236. Geoffrey W. Brand, “Hercules with the Distaff: Johnson and Hannah Glasse's The Art of Cookery,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 4 (2000): 17–21.
  237. Richard Braverman, “The Narrative Architecture of Rasselas,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 3 (1990): 91–111.
  238. Charlotte Brewer, “Johnson, Webster, and the Oxford English Dictionary,” in A Companion to the History of the English Language, ed. Haruko Momma and Michael Matto (Maldon, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2008), pp. 112–21.
    A short overview of three milestone English dictionaries.
  239. Peter M. Briggs, “‘News from the Little World’: A Critical Glance at Eighteenth-Century British Advertising,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 23 (1993): 29–45.
  240. Adrian Bristow, ed., Dr Johnson and Mrs Thrale's Tour in North Wales 1774 (Wrexham: Bridge Books, 1995). Pp. 147.
    Contains Johnson's Journey into North Wales in the Year 1774 and Hester Thrale's Journal of a Tour in Wales with Dr. Johnson. With illustrations and maps.
  241. J. Brody, “Constantes et modeles de la critique anti-‘manieriste’ à l'age ‘classique,’” Rivista di litterature moderne e comparate 40, no. 2 (1987): 95–121.
  242. David Bromwich, “Samuel Johnson,” in Literary Genius: 25 Classic Writers Who Define English & American Literature, ed. Joseph Epstein, with wood engravings by Barry Moser (Philadelphia: Paul Dry Books, 2007), pp. 46–55.
    A brief introduction to Johnson's life, works, and character, with extracts from the Lives of Swift, Pope, and Gray
  243. Bertrand H. Bronson and J. M. O'Meara, eds., Selections from Johnson on Shakespeare (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1986). Pp. xxxvii + 373. Reviews:
  244. Christopher Brooks, “Johnson's Insular Mind and the Analogy of Travel: A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” Essays in Literature 18, no. 1 (Spring 1991), pp. 21–36.
  245. Christopher Brooks, “Nekayah's Courage and Female Wisdom,” College Language Association Journal 36, no. 1 (Sept. 1992): 52–72.
  246. Allan Brown, “The Making of Boswell,” The Sunday Times, 16 Sept. 2001. Discusses Sisman, Boswell's Presumptuous Task; Bainbridge, According to Queeney; and Boswell's Edinburgh Journals, 1767–1786.
  247. Anthony E. Brown, Boswellian Studies: A Bibliography, 3rd ed. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press, 1991). Pp. xiii + 176. Reviews:
  248. Paul Brown, “A New View of Johnson's Putative Psychological Disorder: In Praise of Mothers,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 5 (2001): 37–43.
  249. Morris R. Brownell, “Johnson and Mauritius Lowe,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 111–126.
  250. Morris R. Brownell, “‘Dr. Johnson's Ghost’: Genesis of a Satirical Engraving,” Huntington Library Quarterly 50, no. 4 (Autumn 1987): 338–57.
  251. Morris R. Brownell, Samuel Johnson's Attitude to the Arts (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989). Pp. xvii + 195. Reviews:
  252. Morris R. Brownell, “A Bull in the China Shop of Taste: Johnson's Prejudice against the Arts Illustrated,” The New Rambler D:6 (1990–91), 28–31.
  253. Martine Watson Brownley, “The Antagonisms and Affinities of Johnson and Gibbon,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 16 (1986): 183–95.
  254. Martine Watson Brownley, “Liberty in the Literary Criticism of Samuel Johnson,” chapter 3 (pp. 37–50) of The Inner Vision: Liberty and Literature, ed. Edward B. McLean (Wilmington: ISI Books, 2006).
    Johnson “strongly supported political liberties, as long as they liberty asserted was ordered liberty and not license.” Includes readings especially of the Lives and Boswell.
  255. Conrad Brunström, “‘Not Worth Going to See’: The Place of Ireland in Samuel Johnson's Imagination,” Eighteenth-Century Ireland/Iris an dé chultúr 16 (2001): 73–82. Not seen.
  256. Mary Bryden, “Samuel Johnson and Beckett's Happy Days,” N&Q 40, no. 4 (Dec. 1993): 503–4.
  257. Michael Bundock, “An Association Copy of Mrs Piozzi's Anecdotes,” The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 63–67.
  258. Michael Bundock, “Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’ and The Life of Savage,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 177–85. A Response to Stavisky, “Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’ Reconsidered Once More.”
  259. Michael Bundock, “The ‘Prayers and Meditations’ of Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 11–23.
  260. Michael Bundock, “The Making of Johnson's Prayers and Meditations,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 14 (2003): 77–97.
  261. Michael Bundock, “From Slave to Heir: The Strange Journey of Francis Barber,” The New Rambler E:7 (2003–4): 12–28.
  262. Michael Bundock, “Johnson and Women in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 81–109.
  263. Michael Bundock, “Samuel Johnson Tercentenary 2009,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 36–38.
    A two-page calendar of lectures and other celebrations of Johnson's 300th birthday around the world.
  264. Michael Bundock, “Johnsonian Celebrations in England: From Lichfield to the Lords, by Way of the Guildhall,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 29–31.
    On Peter Martin and Nicholas Cambridge's waslk from Lichfield to London in March 2009 and the celebratory dinner at the House of Lords, 14 May 2009.
  265. Michael Bundock, “Did John Hawkins Steal Johnson's Diary?,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 21 (2011): 77–92.
  266. Michael Bundock, “Searching for the Invisible Man: The Images of Francis Barber,” in Editing Lives, ed. Jesse G. Swan (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2014), pp. 107–22.
  267. Anthony Burgess, “The Dictionary Makers,” Wilson Quarterly 17, no. 3 (1993): 104–10.
  268. John J. Burke, Jr., “The Documentary Value of Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 349–72.
  269. John J. Burke, Jr., “When the Falklands First Demanded an Historian: Johnson, Junius, and the Making of History in 1771,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 291–310.
  270. John J. Burke, Jr., “The Originality of Boswell's Version of Johnson's Quarrel with Lord Chesterfield,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 143–61.
  271. John J. Burke, Jr., “Talk, Dialogue, Conversation, and Other Kinds of Speech Acts in Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson,” in Compendious Conversations: The Method of Dialogue in the Early Enlightenment, ed. Kevin L. Cope (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1992), pp. 65–79.
  272. John J. Burke, Jr., “Boswell and the Text of Johnson's Logia,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 25–46. See also Greene, “‘Beyond Probability’: A Boswellian Act of Faith.”
  273. John J. Burke, Jr., “‘Johnson as Zeus, Boswell as Danaë’: Que(e)r(y)ing Sex and Gender Roles in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 7 (2002): 375–85.
  274. [Add to item 10/6:376] John J. Burke, Jr., and Donald Kay, eds., The Unknown Samuel Johnson (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1983). Reviews:
  275. F. D. A. Burns, “William Shenstone's Years at Oxford,” Notes & Queries 45, no. 4 (1998): 462–64.
  276. Kate Burridge, “ ‘Corruptions of Ignorance,’ ‘Caprices of Innovation’: Linguistic Purism and the Lexicographer,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 10 (Aug. 2008): 25–38
    Not seen.
  277. Robert Burrowes, Essay on the Stile of Doctor Samuel Johnson, ed. Frank H. Ellis (New York: AMS Press, 1992). Pp. xxii + 56. Reviews:
  278. John Burrows, “The Englishing of Juvenal: Computational Stylistics and Translated Texts,” Style 35, no. 4 (2002): 677–99.
  279. Jamie Bush, “Authorial Authority: Johnson's Life of Savage and Nabokov's Nikolai Gogol,” Biography 19, no. 1 (Winter 1996): 19–40.
  280. James Nicholas Damian Bush, “Samuel Johnson and the Art of Domesticity,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Toronto, 2002.
  281. Jamie Bush, “Courtship and Private Character in Johnson's Rambler Essays on Marriage,” English Language Notes 43, no. 2 (2005): 50–58. Not seen.
  282. A. J. L. Busst, “Scottish Second Sight: The Rise and Fall of a European Myth,” European Romantic Review 5, no. 2 (1995): 149–77.
  283. Robin Butlin, “Landscape, Literature and English Religious Culture, 1660–1800: Samuel Johnson and Languages of Natural Description,” Progress in Human Geography 31, no. 3 (June 2007): 421–22.
    Not seen.
  284. John W. Byrne, “To Drive the Night Along”: A Mansucript of Samuel Johnson's Latin Translation of a Greek Epigram (Los Angeles: Samuel Johnson Society of the West, 2009). Pp. 6 and a single loose facsimile.
    A keepsake on Byrne's acquisition of Johnson's brief Latin translation from the Greek Anthology, completed 28 Jan. 1784, with a facsimile.
  285. Silvia Cacchiani, “Desperately, Utterly and Other Intensifiers: On Their Inclusion and Definition in Dr Johnson's Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 217–36. Not seen.
  286. Annette Cafarelli, “Narrative, Sequence, and Biography: Johnson and Romantic Prose,” Dissertation Abstracts International 46, no. 9 (March 1986): 2697–98A. Not seen.
  287. Annette Wheeler Cafarelli, “Johnson's Lives of the Poets and the Romantic Canon,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 403–35.
  288. Annette Cafarelli, Prose in the Age of Poets: Romanticism and Biographical Narrative from Johnson to De Quincey (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 1990). Pp. vi + 301.
  289. Annette Wheeler Cafarelli, “Johnson and Women: Demasculinizing Literary History,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 61–114.
  290. Michael Caldwell, “Dr. Clark and Mr. Holmes: Speculation in Johnsonian Biography,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 133–48.
  291. Craig R. Callen, “Comments: Kicking Rocks with Dr. Johnson: A Comment on Professor Allen's Theory,” Cardozo Law Review 13, nos. 2–3 (Nov. 1991): 423.
  292. Charles Leo Campbell, “Image and Symbol in Rasselas: Narrative Form and ‘The Flux of Life,’” English Studies in Canada 16, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 263–77.
  293. Charles Campbell, “Johnson's Arab: Anti-Orientalism in Rasselas,” Abhath al-Yarmouk 12, no. 1 (1994): 51–66.
  294. Ian Campbell, “Boswell's Life of Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1996): 1–10.
  295. Stuart Campbell, Boswell's Bus Pass (Dingwall: Sandstone, 2011). Pp. xiv + 228.
  296. John Ashton Cannon, Samuel Johnson and the Politics of Hanoverian England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994). Pp. vii + 326. Reviews:
  297. William B. Carey, “Doctor Johnson on Corporal Punishment,” Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics 22, no. 5 (Oct. 2001): 333. Brief quotation from Boswell.
  298. Erik Carlquist, “Samuel Johnson före Boswell,” Kulturtidskriften Horisont 34, no. 2 (1987): 10–11. In Swedish.
  299. Geoffrey Carnall, “A Conservative Mind under Stress: Aspects of Johnson's Political Writings,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 30–46.
  300. W. B. Carnochan, “The Call of Abyssinia: Father Lobo, Samuel Johnson, and Rasselas,” chapter 1 (pp. 3–15) of Golden Legends: Images of Abyssinia, Samuel Johnson to Bob Marley (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 2008).
    Not seen.
    Reviews:
  301. Susan Catto, “Bonnie Prince Sam?: Mud Is Being Vehemently Slung over Whether a Great 18th-Century Critic Was a Closet Supporter of Prince Charles Edward Stuart,” National Post, 18 May 2000, A17.
  302. James J. Caudle, “The Church's Kicked Foundation: A Concealed Johnsonian Detail,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 42–48.
    On Boswell's “protective deletion” of episodes in the MS of the Life. When SJ kicks the stone to refute Berkeley, it was originally a foundation stone of a church building; Boswell revised it before publication to portray SJ's devotion.
  303. James J. Caudle, “‘O Rare Sam Jonson’: James Boswell's Journal of a Tour to Hawthornden Castle with Samuel Johnson and Ben Jonson, 1773,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 22 (2012): 23–71.
  304. Richard Cavendish, “Publication of Dr Johnson's Dictionary: April 15th, 17th,” History Today 55, no. 4 (April 2005): 52–53.
    A short notice observing the 250th anniversary of the Dictionary.
  305. Wallace Chafe, “Cowper's Connoisseur #138 and Samuel Johnson,” Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (1985), pp. 214–25.
  306. Alan Chalmers, “Scottish Prospects: Thomas Pennant, Samuel Johnson, and the Possibilities of Travel Narrative,” in Historical Boundaries, Narrative Forms: Essays on British Literature in the Long Eighteenth Century in Honor of Everett Zimmerman, ed. Lorna Clymer and Robert Mayer (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2007), pp. 199–214.
    “While Johnson may have been linked arm-in-arm with Boswell on the road, he was really ‘strolling’ with Pennant in his writing. . . . Pennant's ambition to write an exhaustive and definitive study of Scotland if anything facilitates rather than inhibits Johnson's own composition, fostering its distinct subjective voice.”
  307. Sir Robert Chambers, A Course of Lectures on the English Law: Delivered at the University of Oxford 1767–1773, ed. Thomas M. Curley, 2 vols. (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1986). Pp. xix + 483; xv + 445.
    The first edition of Chambers's Lectures, secretly co-authored by Johnson. Curley's editorial material makes the case for Johnson's involvement.
    Reviews:
  308. David Chandler, “John Henry Colls and the Remarks on the Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” N&Q 42, no. 4 (Dec. 1995): 469–71.
  309. Naresh Chandra, “Dr. Johnson and the English Language,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 5–24.
  310. Huei-keng Chang, “Mimesis and Copia as Enflaming Strategies: The Function of Samuel Johnson's Philological and Literary Criticism,” Humanitas Taiwanica 48 (1998): 199–218.
  311. Huei-keng Chang, “The Purloined Shakespeare and Samuel Johnson's Scriptural Operation,” Humanitas Taiwanica 50 (1999): 143–98.
  312. Huei-keng Chang, “Genre Criticism, Textual Strategy and Différance: Historicizing Samuel Johnson's Writing of Private Lives,” Studies in Language & Literature 9 (June 2000): 61–86. Not seen.
  313. Huei-keng Chang, “Samuel Johnson and Translating Pastoral,” Humanitas Taiwanica 58 (2003): 212–30.
  314. Huei-keng Chang, “Signs Taken for Wonders: The Vanity of Human Wishes and the Production of a ‘Relevant’ Translation,” NTU Studies in Language and Literature 14 (Sept. 2006): 55–80. Not seen.
  315. Chester Chapin, “Religion and the Nature of Samuel Johnson's Toryism,” Cithara: Essays in the Judaeo-Christian Tradition 29, no. 2 (May 1990): 38–54.
  316. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson, Anthropologist,” Eighteenth-Century Life 19 (Nov. 1995): 22–37.
  317. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Locke-Stillingfleet Controversy,” N&Q 44, no. 2 (June 1997): 210–11.
  318. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson, Samuel Clarke and the Toleration of Heresy,” Enlightenment and Dissent 16 (1997): 136–50.
  319. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and Joseph Addison's Anti-Jacobite Writings,” Notes & Queries 48, no. 1 (March 2001): 38–40.
  320. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson: Latitudinarian or High Churchman?,” Cithara: Essays in the Judeo-Christian Tradition 41, no. 1 (Nov. 2001): 35–43.
  321. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Geologists,” Cithara 42, no. 1 (2002): 33–44. Not seen.
  322. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson on Education and the English Class Structure,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 9 (2003): 189–206.
  323. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Argument from Prophecy,” Cithara 45, no. 1 (Nov. 2005): 28–40.
    Not seen.
  324. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Church's Convocation,” Cithara 46, no. 2 (May 2007): 16–24.
    Not seen.
  325. James Aaron Chapman, “The Foundation of Samuel Johnson's Morality,” M.A. Thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1995. Not seen.
  326. Michael J. Chappell, “Samuel Johnson and Community,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 8 (Feb. 2000): 2937A. Fordham Univ. Not seen.
  327. Michael Chappell, “‘The Meer Gift of Luck’: A Tale of Lottery Addiction in Rambler 181,” Dalhousie Review 82, no. 3 (Autumn 2002): 481–90.
  328. Michael J. Chappell, “Not Your Father's (or Mother's) Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 14–16.
  329. Lianhong Chen, “A Cross-Cultural Dialogue: Eighteenth-Century British Representations of China,” Dissertation Abstracts, 57 (1997): 4748–49A. Not seen.
  330. Warren Chernaik, “Johnson and the Imagination,” The New Rambler E:1 (1997–98), 42–49.
  331. Charles Waddell Chesnutt, Who and Why Was Samuel Johnson (Akron: Northern Ohio Bibliophilic Society, 1991). Pp. iv + 19. With a preface by Robert A. Tibbetts. Keepsake volume of the text of a 1911 speech by Chesnutt. Reprinted in Charles W. Chesnutt: Essays and Speeches, ed. Joseph R. McElrath, Jr., Robert C. Leitz III, and Jesse S. Crisler (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1999).
  332. Tita Chico, “Rasselas and the Rise of the Novel,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 1 (March 2005): 8–11.
  333. Leslie A. Chilton, “Samuel Johnson and the Adventures of Telemachus,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1993): 8–13.
  334. Kate Chisolm, Wits and Wives: Dr Johnson in the Company of Women (London: Chatto & Windus, 2011). Pp. 291.
  335. Chung-Ho Chung, “The Great Cham and the Mirror: An Essay on the Multiple Perspectives in Samuel Johnson's Literary Criticism,” Dissertation Abstracts International 48, no. 9 (March 1988): 2342A.
  336. H. N. Claman, “Creativity and Illness: Christopher Smart and Samuel Johnson,” Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society 64, no. 33 (Summer 2001): 4–7. Not seen.
  337. Jonathan Clark, “The Heartfelt Toryism of Dr. Johnson,” TLS, 14 Oct. 1994, pp. 17–18.
  338. J. C. D. Clark, Samuel Johnson: Literature, Religion and English Cultural Politics from the Restoration to Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994). Pp. xiv + 270. Reviews:
  339. J. C. D. Clark, “The Politics of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 27–56.
    An early salvo in the arguments over Johnson's attitudes toward Jacobitism.
  340. J. C. D. Clark, “The Cultural Identity of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 15–70.
    A further consideration of Johnson's take on Jacobitism, placed in a larger cultural context.
  341. J. C. D. Clark, “Religious Affiliation and Dynastic Allegiance in Eighteenth-Century England: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine and Samuel Johnson,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 1029–67.
  342. J. C. D. Clark, “Religion and Political Identity: Samuel Johnson as a Nonjuror,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 79–145.
  343. Jonathan Clark, “Samuel Johnson,” letter to the editor, TLS 5792 (4 April 2014): 6.
    Clark responds to Weinbrot's letter of 28 March 2014.
  344. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill, eds., Samuel Johnson in Historical Context (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. Pp. xii + 318.
    A collection of scholarly essays, especially on Johnson's politics. His putative Jacobitism is discussed in many of the contributions.
    Reviews:
  345. Jonathan Clarke and Howard Erskine-Hill, eds., Interpretation of Samuel Johnson (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). Pp. xiv + 230.
  346. Norma Clarke, Dr Johnson's Women (London: Hambledon & London, 2000). Pp. xii + 260. Reviews:
  347. Stephen Clarke, “‘Prejudice, Bigotry, and Arrogance’: Horace Walpole's Abuse of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 239–57.
  348. Stephen Clarke, “Indifference and Abuse: The Antipathy of Mason, Gray, Walpole and Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler, E:6 (2002–3): 12–25.
  349. Stephen Clarke, “A Johnson Parody,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 52–55. On Gooseberry Hall, a satire on the sale of Horace Walpole's library, and a parody of Johnson's style.
  350. Stephen Clarke, “Unhorsed by Pegasus: Gray's Poetry and the Critics before The Lives of the Poets,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 21 (2011): 193–215.
  351. E. J. Clery, “Laying the Ground for Gothic: The Passage of the Supernatural from Truth to Spectacle,” in Exhibited by Candlelight: Sources and Developments in the Gothic Tradition, ed. Valeria Tinkler-Villani, Peter Davidson, and Jane Stevenson (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1995), pp. 65–74.
  352. [Add to item 3:250] James L. Clifford, Dictionary Johnson: Samuel Johnson's Middle Years (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1979). Reviews:
  353. Dorothy Peake Cline, “The Word Abused: Problematic Religious Language in Selected Prose Works of Swift, Wesley, and Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 9 (March 1992): 3290A. University of Delaware. Not seen.
  354. Edward Cline, “Samuel Johnson: Imperious Lexicographer,” Colonial Williamsburg: The Journal of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 20, no. 1 (Autumn 1997): 42–48.
  355. Greg Clingham, “Johnson on Dryden and Pope,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cambridge, 1986. Not seen.
  356. Greg Clingham, “Johnson's Use of Two Restoration Poems in his ‘Drury-Lane’ Prologue,” The New Rambler D:1 (1985–86), 45–50.
  357. G. J. Clingham, “‘The Inequalities of Memory’: Johnson's Epitaphs on Hogarth,” English: The Journal of the English Association 35, no. 153 (Autumn 1986): 221–32.
  358. Greg Clingham, “A Minor Source for Johnson's ‘Life of Pope,’” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1986–87), 53–54.
  359. G. J. Clingham, “‘Himself that Great Sublime’: Johnson's Critical Thinking,” Etudes anglaises 41, no. 2 (April–June 1988): 165–78.
  360. Gregory J. Clingham, “Johnson's Criticism of Dryden's Odes in Praise of St. Cecilia,” Modern Language Studies 18, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 165–80.
  361. Greg Clingham, “Johnson, Homeric Scholarship, and ‘The Passes of the Mind,’” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 113–70.
  362. Greg Clingham, “Johnson's Prayers and Meditations and the ‘Stolen Diary Problem’: Reflections on a Biographical Quiddity,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 83–95.
  363. Greg Clingham, ed., New Light on Boswell: Critical and Historical Essays on the Occasion of the Bicentenary of “The Life of Johnson” (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991). Pp. xix + 235. Reviews:
  364. Greg Clingham, “Truth and Artifice in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 207–29.
  365. Greg Clingham, James Boswell: The Life of Johnson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992). Pp. xviii + 131. Landmarks of World Literature Series. Reviews:
  366. Greg Clingham, “Boswell's Historiography,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 307 (1993): 1765–69.
  367. Greg Clingham, “Another and the Same: Johnson's Dryden,” in Literary Transmission and Authority: Dryden and Other Writers, ed. Jennifer Brady and Earl Miner (Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 121–59.
  368. Greg Clingham, “Double Writing: The Erotics of Narrative in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in James Boswell: Psychological Interpretations, ed. Donald J. Newman (New York: St. Martin's, 1995), pp. 189–214.
  369. Greg Clingham, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997; rev. ed., 1999). Pp. xx + 266. Reviews:
  370. Greg Clingham, “Life and Literature in Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 161–91.
  371. Greg Clingham, “Resisting Johnson,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 19–36.
  372. Greg Clingham, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson Chinese-language edition (Shanghai: Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press, 2001). Not seen.
  373. Greg Clingham, “Roscommon's ‘Academy,’ Chetwood's Manuscript ‘Life of Roscommon,’ and Dryden's Translation Project,” Restoration 26, no. 1 (2002): 15–26.
  374. Greg Clingham, Johnson, Writing, and Memory (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2002). Pp. xii + 222. Reviews:
  375. Greg Clingham, “Johnson at Bucknell,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 30–32.
    On recent Johnsonian publications from Bucknell Univ. Press, of which Clingham is the Director.
  376. Greg Clingham, “Anna Williams's Miscellanies in Prose and Verse in the Houghton Library,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 44–45.
    A transcription of Thomas Percy's notes in a copy of Williams now in the Hyde Collection. Percy provides brief biographical background on Williams and attributesseveral works to Johnson.
  377. Greg Clingham, “Johnson, Ends, and the Possibility of Happiness,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 33–54.
    Not seen???
  378. Greg Clingham, “A Johnsonian in Japan,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 37–40.
    An account of Clingham's lectures to Japanese universities and the Johnson Society of Japan, with a discussion of Johnsonian publications in Japan.
  379. Greg Clingham, “Hawkins, Biography, and the Law,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 137–54.
  380. G. J. Clingham and N. Hopkinson, “Johnson's Copy of the Iliad at Felbrigg Hall, Norfolk,” The Book Collector 37, no. 4 (Winter 1988): 503–21.
  381. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood, eds., Samuel Johnson after 300 Years (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009). Pp. 291.
    A collection of fourteen original essays to mark Johnson's tercentenary. See the separate entries by Fred Parker, Greg Clingham, Howard Weinbrot, Clement Hawes, David Venturo, J. T. Scanlan, Jack Lynch, David Fairer, Philip Smallwood, Adam Rounce, Isobel Grundy, Freya Johnston, O M Brack, Jr., and David Ferry.
    Reviews:
  382. Martin Clout, “Hester Thrale and the Globe Theatre,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 34–50.
  383. Hamilton E. Cochrane, Boswell's Literary Art: An Annotated Bibliography of Critical Studies, 1900–1985 (New York: Garland, 1992). Pp. ix + 162.
  384. Paula Marantz Cohen, “The Talking Life: Boswell and Johnson,” Boulevard 17 (Fall 2001): 115–26. Not seen.
    “This book analyses the structure and function of each literary allusion identified in A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (1775). Johnson's familiarity with the classics and other literatures is thereby manifested in a variety of ways, with a powerful personal voice and, no less important, looking for reader involvement. Allusion, as contended in this monograph, is indeed an integral part of the formal artistry and intellectual depth of the Journey, thus contributing to making Johnson's Scottish travelogue what it is — a major exponent of Travel Literature.” Not seen.
  385. Frank Collings, “Dr. Johnson and his Medical Advisers,” The New Rambler C:25 (1984): 3–18.
  386. Michael Dennis Collins, “Taxation No Tyranny: Samuel Johnson, Barrister to the Crown,” M.A. Thesis, California State University, Northridge, 1989. Not seen.
  387. Syndy M. Conger, “Three Unlikely Fellow Travellers: Mary Wollstonecraft, Yorick, Samuel Johnson,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 305 (1992): 1667–68.
  388. John Considine, “The Lexicographer as Hero: Samuel Johnson and Henri Estienne,” Philological Quarterly 79, no. 2 (Spring 2000): 205–24. Not seen.
  389. Donald N. Cook, “The History of Dr. Johnson's Summer-House,” The New Rambler C:24 (1983), 49–58.
  390. Hilary Cool, “Samuel Johnson,” TLS 5572 (15 Jan. 2010): 6.
    A letter to the editor on David Nokes's biography, arguing for the importance of Hester Thrale in that book.
  391. Robert Cooperman, “Boswell on Dr. Johnson's Friend Mrs. Anna Williams,” Antigonish Review 64 (Winter 1986): 101. Poem on Anna Williams.
  392. Kevin L. Cope, “Rational Hope, Rational Benevolence, and Johnson's Economy of Happiness,” Eighteenth-Century Life, 10, no. 3 (Oct. 1986): 104–21.
  393. Kevin L. Cope, “Rational Hope, Rational Benevolence, and Ethical Accounting: Johnson and Swift on the Economy of Happiness,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 181–213.
  394. Robert Cording, “Dr. Johnson: From the Western Isles,” Sewanee Review 94, no. 4 (Oct.–Dec. 1986): 519–20. Poem.
  395. John Craig, “Numeracy and Dr Johnson,” The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 47–54.
  396. John Craig, “Johnson and Economics,” The New Rambler, E:2 (1998–99), 3–15.
  397. Julie Crane, “Johnson and the Art of Interruption,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 19 (2009): 29–46.
    A meditation on Johnson's use of “interruption,” which explores his own relationship with realistic fiction. Crane argues that “here was a novelist, if a reluctant one, in Johnson.”
  398. Maxwell Craven, “Maxwell Craven” (column), The Derby Evening Telegraph, 24 Nov. 2005, p. 8. On the 50p coin commemorating the Dictionary.
  399. Thomas Crawford, “Boswell and the Rhetoric of Friendship,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 11–27.
  400. André Crépin, “Samuel Johnson, Élisabeth Bourcier et la conscience chrétienne,” in Ténebres et lumière: Essais sur la religion, la vie et la mort chrétiennes en Angleterre en hommage à la mémoire d'Elisabeth Bourcier (Paris: Didier, 1987): 7–10. In French.
  401. John Cresswell, “The Streatham Johnson Knew,” The New Rambler E:3 (1999–2000): 22–27.
  402. Mary Jane Burbank Crotty, “Images of Women: Boswell's Scotland Tour with Johnson Revisited,” Dissertation Abstracts International 49, no. 12 (June 1989): 3730A. Not seen.
  403. Robin N. Crouch, “Samuel Johnson on Drinking,” Dionysos: The Literature and Addiction TriQuarterly 5, no. 2 (Fall 1993): 19–27.
  404. E. Cruikshanks, “Samuel Johnson and Jacobitism: A Response to Donald Greene,” TLS, 8 Sept. 1995, p. 17.
  405. Eveline Cruickshanks, “Tory and Whig ‘Patriots’: Lord Gower and Lord Chesterfield,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 146–68.
  406. Marisol Cuevas Segarra, “Samuel Johnson's Rasselas and Voltaire's Candide: A Comparation [sic],” M.A. Thesis, Universidad de Puerto Rico, 1986. Not seen.
  407. Paul K. Cuneo, “Another Odd Couple: Dr. Samuel Johnson and David Garrick,” Biblio 3, no. 6 (June 1998): 22.
  408. Thomas M. Curley, “Samuel Johnson and Sir Robert Chambers: A Creative Partnership in English Law,” Indian Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 1, no. 1 (Summer 1986): 1–16. Not seen.
  409. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson's Last Word on Ossian: Ghostwriting for William Shaw,” in Aberdeen and the Enlightenment, ed. Jennifer J. Carter (Aberdeen: Aberdeen Univ. Press, 1987), pp. 375–431.
  410. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson's Tour of Scotland and the Idea of Great Britain,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 12 (1989): 135–44.
  411. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson and Burke: Constitutional Evolution versus Political Revolution,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 263 (1989): 265–68.
  412. Thomas M. Curley, “Samuel Johnson and India,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 9–29.
  413. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson and America,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 31–74.
  414. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson No Jacobite; or, Treason Not Yet Unmasked,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 137–62.
    A response to Clark and Erskine-Hill, arguing that Johnson was not a Jacobite.
  415. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson No Jacobite; or, Treason Not Yet Unmasked: Part II, A Quotable Rejoinder from A to C,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 127–31.
    A continuation of Curley's argument against Johnson's putative Jacobitism.
  416. Thomas M. Curley, “Johnson and the Irish: A Postcolonial Survey of the Irish Literary Renaissance in Imperial Great Britain,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 67–197.
    A monograph-length survey of Johnson's interest in and knowledge of Irish culture.
  417. Thomas M. Curley, “Samuel Johnson and Truth: The First Systematic Detection of Literary Deception in James Macpherson's Ossian,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 119–96.
    An extensive investigation of Macpherson's manipulation of traditional material in the Ossianic poems.
  418. Thomas M. Curley, Samuel Johnson, the “Ossian” Fraud, and the Celtic Revival in Great Britain and Ireland (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009). Pp. 338.
    A comprehensive review of Johnson's involvement in the Ossian affair and an extended look at his relationship with Irish culture.
    Reviews:
  419. M. A. Curr, “Anchoring the Imagination: A Study of Dr Johnson's Latin Poetry,” Index to Theses 44, no. 4 (1995): 1436. University of London.
  420. Jennifer Currie, “Doctors Steal the Limelight,” Times Higher Education Supplement, 9 July 1999, pp. 8–9. On honorary degrees.
  421. Julia Curtis, “Review of Reviews,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 49–51.
    A survey of reviews of the recent biographies by Peter Martin and Jeffrey Meyers, drawn from the New York Times, the Financial Times, the New Yorker, and the Johnsonian News Letter.
  422. Leopold Damrosch, Jr., Fictions of Reality in the Age of Hume and Johnson (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1989). Pp. ix + 262. Reviews:
  423. Leopold Damrosch, Jr., ed., Major Authors on CD-ROM: Samuel Johnson and James Boswell (Woodbridge, Conn.: Primary Source Media, 1997). Complete works of Johnson; near-complete works of Boswell. Reviews:
  424. Leo Damrosch “A Tercentenary Address: Doctor Johnson and Jean-Jacques: Two Styles of Thinking and Being,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 8–17.
    “In a talk of this kind, the usual gambit would be to say that Rousseau and Johnson may look different superficially, but deep down they turn out to be alike. Well, they don't. They're 180 degrees apart on pretty much everything.”
  425. Stephen C. Danckert, ed., The Quotable Johnson: A Topical Compilation of His Wit and Moral Wisdom (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1992). Pp. 148. With a foreword by Joseph Sobran.
  426. Joel Allan Dando, “The Poet as Critic: Byron in His Letters and Journals: Case Studies of Shakespeare and Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 46, no. 7 (Jan. 1986): 1947A. Not seen.
  427. Marlies K. Danziger, “Self-Restraint and Self-Display in the Authorial Comments in The Life of Johnson,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 162–73.
  428. Donald Davie, “Politics and Literature: John Adams and Doctor Johnson,” chapter 14 (pp. ???) of A Travelling Man: Eighteenth-Century Bearings, ed. Doreen Davie (Manchester: Carcanet, 2003).
    Not seen.
  429. Robertson Davies, Why I Do Not Intend to Write an Autobiography (Toronto: Harbourfront Reading Series, 1993). Pp. 15. 500 copies. Fiction based on Johnson.
  430. Ross Davies, “Bless You, Dr. Johnson,” Connoisseur, 214 (Sept. 1984): 36.
  431. Bertram Hylton Davis, Thomas Percy: A Scholar-Cleric in the Age of Johnson (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 1989). Pp. xi + 361.
  432. Lennard J. Davis, “Dr. Johnson, Amelia, and the Discourse of Disability,” in “Defects”: Engendering the Early Modern Body, ed. Helen Deutsch and Felicity Nussbaum (Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press, 2000), pp. 54–74. Reprinted in Lennard J. Davis, Bending Over Backwards: Disability, Dismodernism, and Other Difficult Positions (New York: New York Univ. Press, 2002), pp. 47–66.
  433. Matthew M. Davis, “‘The Most Fatal of All Faults’: Samuel Johnson on Prior's Solomon and the Need for Variety,” Papers on Language & Literature 33, no. 4 (Fall 1997): 422–37.
  434. Matthew M. Davis, “Conflicts of Principle in Samuel Johnson's Literary Criticism,” Dissertation Abstracts International, 61, no. 6 (Dec. 2000): 2310A. University of Virginia.
  435. Matthew M. Davis, “‘Elevated Notions of the Right of Kings’: Stuart Sympathies in Johnson's Notes to Richard II,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 239–64.
  436. Matthew Davis, “Johnsoniana,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 17–27.
  437. Matthew Davis, “Fructus Sanctorum: A Newly Identified Title from Johnson's Library,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 29–32.
  438. Matthew M. Davis, “‘Ask for the Old Paths’: Johnson and the Usages Controversy,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 17–68.
    A scholarly investigation of SJ's involvement in a religious dispute.
  439. Philip Davis, In Mind of Johnson: A Study of Johnson the Rambler (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1989). Pp. 318. Reviews:
  440. Philip Davis, “Extraordinarily Ordinary: The Life of Samuel Johnson,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 4–17.
  441. Leanne Day, “‘Those Ungodly Pressmen’: The Early Years of the Brisbane Johnsonian Club,” Australian Literary Studies, 21, no. 1 (May 2003): 92–102. Not seen.
  442. Robert Adams Day, “Psalmanazar's ‘Formosa’ and the British Reader (Including Samuel Johnson),” in Exoticism in the Enlightenment, ed. G. S. Rousseau and Roy Porter (Manchester: Manchester Univ. Press, 1989), pp. 197–221.
  443. Merrowyn Deacon, “Dr. Johnson and Music,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2, no. 1 (1998): 1–7.
  444. Tim Dean, “Psychopoetics of Lexicography: Johnson with Lacan,” Literature and Psychology 37, no. 4 (1991): 9–28.
  445. Frank Delaney, A Walk to the Western Isles: After Boswell & Johnson (London: HarperCollins, 1993). Pp. xii + 308. Reviews:
  446. Frank Delaney, “The Devout Dr Johnson,” The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 16–22.
  447. Lillian De La Torre, The Return of Dr. Sam. Johnson, Detector: As Told by James Boswell (New York: International Polygonics, 1985). Pp. 191. Fiction.
  448. Lillian De La Torre, The Exploits of Dr. Sam Johnson, Detector: Told as if by James Boswell (New York: International Polygonics, 1987). Pp. 220. Fiction.
  449. Lillian De La Torre, Dr. Sam Johnson, Detector (Charlotte Hall, Md.: Recorded Books, 1989). Sound recording of fiction on 5 cassettes.
  450. Anthony Louis DeLuca, “Reading Samuel Johnson ‘Anew’: Hester Thrale's Private, Social, and Public Views of Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 61, no. 2 (Aug. 2000): 617A. City Univ. of New York. Not seen.
  451. Robert DeMaria, Jr., Johnson's Dictionary and the Language of Learning (Chapel Hill: Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1986). Pp. xii + 303. Reviews:
  452. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “The Politics of Johnson's Dictionary,” PMLA 104, no. 1 (Jan. 1989): 64–74.
  453. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Reading Revolution,” Eighteenth-Century Life 16, no. 3 (Nov. 1992): 86–102.
  454. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Johnson's Dictionary and the ‘Teutonick’ Roots of the English Language,” in Language and Civilization: A Concerted Profusion of Essays and Studies in Honor of Otto Hietsch, I & II, ed. Claudia Blank and Patrick Selim Huck (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1992): I, 20–36.
  455. Robert DeMaria, Jr., The Life of Samuel Johnson: A Critical Biography (Oxford: Blackwell, 1993). Pp. xviii + 356. Reviews:
  456. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Latter-Day Humanists and the Pastness of the Past,” Common Knowledge 3 (1993): 67–76.
  457. Robert DeMaria, Jr., Samuel Johnson and the Life of Reading (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1997). Pp. xviii + 270. Reviews:
  458. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Johnson's Dictionary,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 85–101.
  459. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Samuel Johnson at Vassar,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 38–42.
  460. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Johnson, Johnsonians, and ‘Cooperative Enterprise,’” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 20–29.
  461. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Johnson's Extempore History and Grammar of the English Language,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 77–91.
  462. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “The Gove-Liebert File of Quotations from Johnson's Dictionary (II),” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 1 (March 2005): 28–30.
  463. Robert DeMaria, Jr., ed., Adam Smith Reviews Samuel Johnson's “A Dictionary of the English Language” (privately printed for the Johnsonians and the Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California, 2005). Includes a facsimile of Smith's review in The Edinburgh Review.
  464. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “North and South in Johnson's Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 11–32. Not seen.
  465. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Saxonic Shakespeare,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 25–46.
    On Johnson's treatment of Shakespeare in the Dictionary in light of his comments on the Germanic origins of the English language.
  466. Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Samuel Parr's Epitaph for Johnson, His Library, and His Unwritten Biography,” in Editing Lives, ed. Jesse G. Swan (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2014), pp. 67–92.
  467. Robert DeMaria, Jr., and Gwin J. Kolb, “The Preliminaries to Dr. Johnson's Dictionary: Authorial Revisions and the Establishment of the Texts,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 121–34.
  468. Robert DeMaria, Jr., and Gwin J. Kolb, “Johnson's Dictionary and Dictionary Johnson,” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 19–43.
  469. Ralph De Toledano, “Dr. Johnson Revisited: Samuel Johnson and the Evolution of Language,” National Review 43, no. 12 (8 July 1991): 44. Comments on Redford's edition of the Letters.
  470. Helen Elizabeth Deutsch, “‘The Confines of Distinction’: Horace, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson and the Making of the Literary Career,” Dissertation Abstracts International, 51, no. 9 (March 1991): 3080–81A. University of California, Berkeley. Not seen.
  471. Helen Deutsch, “‘The Name of an Author’: Moral Economics in Johnson's Life of Savage,” Modern Philology 92 (Feb. 1995): 328–45.
  472. Helen Deutsch, “Doctor Johnson's Autopsy, or Anecdotal Immortality,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 40, no. 2 (Summer 1999): 113–27.
  473. Helen Deutsch, “The Author as Monster: The Case of Dr. Johnson,” in “Defects”: Engendering the Modern Body ed. Helen Deutsch and Felicity Nussbaum (Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press, 2000), pp. 177–209.
  474. Helen Deutsch, “Exemplary Aberration: Samuel Johnson and the English Canon,” in Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities, ed. Sharon L. Snyder, Brenda Jo Brueggemann, and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson (New York: MLA Press, 2002), pp. 197–210.
  475. Helen Deutsch, “‘Thou Art a Scholar, Speak to It, Horatio’: Uncritical Reading and Johnsonian Romance,” in Polemic: Critical or Uncritical, ed. Jane Gallop (New York: Routledge, 2004), pp. 65–102.
  476. Helen Deutsch, Loving Dr. Johnson (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2005). Pp. 308.
    On scholarly and popular fascination with SJ as a man, including interest in his body.
    Reviews:
  477. Peter Jan De Voogd, ““The Great Object of Remark’: Samuel Johnson and Laurence Sterne,” Essays on English and American Literature and a Sheaf of Poems, ed. J. Bakker, J. A. Verleun, and J v. d. Vriesenaerde (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1987) [i.e., Costerus vol. 63], pp. 65–74.
  478. Gerard De Vries, “Pale Fire and The Life of Johnson: The Case of Hodge and Mystery Lodge,” The Nabokovian 26 (Spring 1991): 44–49.
  479. Bernd Dietz, “Tenerife en las letras inglesas: Posibles antecedentes de un texto de Samuel Johnson,” in Serta Gratulatoria in Honorem Juan Regulo, I: Filologia, ed. Ana Regulo Rodriguez and Maria Regulo Rodriguez (La Laguna: Univ. de La Laguna, 1985), pp. 223–30. In Spanish.
  480. Stephen John Dilks, “Samuel Beckett's Samuel Johnson,” Modern Language Review 92, no. 2 (April 2003): 285–98.
  481. Catherine Dille, “‘A Juster View of Johnson’: George Birkbeck Hill, Johnson and Boswell's Victorian Editor,” The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 24–35.
  482. Catherine Dille, “Johnson, Hill, and the ‘Good Old Cause’: Liberal Interpretation in the Editions of George Birkbeck Hill,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 193–219.
    Dille examines Hill's Johnsonian editions, paying particular attention to his politics.
  483. Catherine Dille, “The Johnson Dictionary Project,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 42–44.
  484. Catherine Dille, “The Dictionary in Abstract: Johnson's Abridgments of the Dictionary of the English Language for the Common Reader,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 198–211.
    The most thorough consideration of the abridged editions of the Dictionary
  485. Catherine Dille, “Johnson's Dictionary in the Nineteenth Century: A Legacy in Transition,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 21–37.
  486. Adolfo Di Luca, “Philosophical Travels in the Eighteenth Century: Some Considerations on Candide and Rasselas,” in Viaggi in utopia, ed. Raffaella Baccolini, Vita Fortunati, and Nadi Minerva (Ravenna: Longo, 1996), pp. 131–42.
  487. R. J. Dingley, “Johnson's ‘Reply to Impromptu Verses by Baretti’: A Clue to Dating,” N&Q 42, no. 4 (Dec 1995): 468.
  488. J. H. Dirckx, “The Death of Samuel Johnson: Was It Hastened by Digitalis Intoxication?” American Journal of Dermatopathology 6, no. 6 (Dec. 1984): 531–36.
  489. G. M. Ditchfield, “Dr. Johnson and the Dissenters,” Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library 68, no. 2 (Spring 1986): 373–409.
  490. G. M. Ditchfield, “Some Unitarian Perceptions of Dr. Johnson,” Transactions of the Unitarian Historical Society 19, no. 3 (1989): 139–52.
  491. G. M. Ditchfield, “Dr Johnson at Oxford, 1759,” N&Q 36, no. 1 (March 1989): 66–68.
  492. G. M. Ditchfield, “Dr. Johnson's Derbyshire Connections,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 30–42.
  493. G. M. Ditchfield, “A Deathbed Anecdote of Dr. Johnson,” N&Q 42, no. 4 (Dec. 1995): 468–69.
  494. Robin Dix, “The Pleasures of Speculation: Scholarly Methodology in Eighteenth-Century Literary Studies,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 23, no. 1 (2000): 85–103.
  495. Robin Dix, “Fugitive References to Johnson in Eighteenth-Century Manuscripts,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 19 (2009): 47–52.
    Dix notes three previously neglected brief mentions of Johnson in unpublished sources.
  496. John Dixon, “Tempering Ambitions: The Cultural Project of Samuel Johnson's Moral Essays,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 12 (June 1996): 4784A. Boston University. Not seen.
  497. John Converse Dixon, “Politicizing Samuel Johnson: The Moral Essays and the Question of Ideology,” College Literature, 25, no. 3 (Fall 1998): 67–90.
  498. Peter Dixon, “Goldsmith and Johnson,” The New Rambler E:1 (1997–98), 50–57.
  499. Francis Doherty, “Rape of the Lock: Stretching the Limits of Allusion,” Anglia: Zeitschrift fur Englische Philologie 111, nos. 3–4 (1993): 355–72.
  500. Fredric F. M. Dolezal, “Charles Richardson's New Dictionary and Literary Lexicography, Being a Rodomontade upon Illustrative Examples,” Lexicographica: International Annual for Lexicography 16 (2000): 104–51.
  501. Daniel E. Doll, “‘Daughters of Earth and Sons of Heaven’: Johnson on Swift on Language,” Lamar Journal of the Humanities 17, no. 2 (Fall 1991): 23–39.
  502. William Domnarski, “Samuel Johnson and the Law,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 2–10.
  503. Ian Donaldson, “Samuel Johnson and the Art of Observation,” ELH 53, no. 4 (Winter 1986): 779–99.
  504. Ian Donaldson, The Death of the Author and the Lives of the Poet: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 1994 (Melbourne: The Johnson Society of Australia, 1994 [i.e., 1995]).
  505. Margaret Anne Doody, “The Law, the Page, and the Body of Women: Murder and Murderess in the Age of Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 126–60.
  506. Marina Dossena, “‘The Cinic Scotomastic’? Johnson, His Commentators, Scots, French, and the Story of English,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 51–68. Not seen.
  507. Hugh Douglas, “Highlanders and Heroines: Dr Johnson's Meeting with Flora Macdonald,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 15–20.
  508. William C. Dowling, “Structure and Absence in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in Modern Essays on Eighteenth-Century Literature, ed. Leopold Damrosch, Jr. (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1988), pp. 355–78.
  509. J. A. Downie, “Swift and Johnson: The Problems of the Life of Swift,” The New Rambler C:24 (1983), 26–27.
  510. J. A. Downie, “Johnson's Politics,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 81–104.
  511. Ben Downing, “On First Looking into Bate's Life of Johnson,” in The Calligraphy Shop (Lincoln: Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2003), pp. 3–6. Poem. Not seen.
  512. John Drozd, “Tools for the Embrace: An Ethical Consideration of Candide and Rassselas,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 8 (Feb. 2000): 2909A. Fordham Univ. Not seen.
  513. Paul M. Duke, “Players on Unbroken Spinets: Thomas Wolfe and James Boswell,” The Thomas Wolfe Review 16, no. 2 (Fall 1992): 47–51.
  514. Ian Duncan, “Adam Smith, Samuel Johnson and the Institutions of English,” in The Scottish Invention of English Literature, ed. Robert Crawford (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 37–54.
  515. Ian Duncan, “The Pathos of Abstraction: Adam Smith, Ossian, and Samuel Johnson,” in Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism, ed. Leith Davis, Ian Duncan, and Janet Sorenson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2004), pp. 38–56.
  516. R. D. Dunn, “Samuel Johnson's Prologue to A Word to the Wise and the Epilogue by ‘A Friend,’” ELN 25, no. 3 (March 1988): 28–35.
  517. Simon During, “Waiting for the Post: Some Relations between Modernity, Colonization, and Writing,” ARIEL 20, no. 4 (Oct. 1989): 31–61.
  518. Simon During, “Waiting for the Post: Some Relations between Modernity, Colonization, and Writing,” in Past the Last Post: Theorizing Post-Colonialism and Post-Modernism, ed. Ian Adam and Helen Tiffin (Calgary: Univ. of Calgary Press, 1990), pp. 23–45.
  519. Simon During, “Waiting for the Post: Some Relations between Modernity, Colonization and Writing,” in History and Post-War Writing, ed. Theo D'haen and Hans Bertens (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1990), pp. 227–57.
  520. John A. Dussinger, “Dr. Johnson's Solemn Response to Beneficence,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 57–69.
  521. John A. Dussinger, “‘The Solemn Magnificence of a Stupendous Ruin’: Richard Savage, Poet Manqué,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 167–82.
  522. John A. Dussinger, “Hester Piozzi, Italy, and the Johnsonian Aether,” South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 46–58.
  523. Robert Easting, “Johnson's Note on ‘Aroint thee, witch!’” N&Q 35, no. 4 (Dec. 1988): 480–82.
  524. Mary Hyde Eccles and Donald D. Eddy, eds., Dr Johnson & Mrs Thrale, the End of Their Long Friendship: Letters in the Hyde Collection (Somerville, N.J.: The Four Oaks Farm Library, 1992). Pp. 28. Contains “Unraveling the Fabric of Friendship” by Bruce Redford, “Provenance” by Mary Hyde Eccles, and facsimiles of four letters. For the annual dinner of The Johnsonians commemorating Johnson's two hundred eighty-third birthday at the Grolier Club in New York.
  525. Donald D. Eddy, Sale Catalogues of the Libraries of Samuel Johnson, Hester Lynch Thrale (Mrs. Piozzi) and James Boswell (New Castle, Del.: Oak Knoll Books, 1993). Pp. 328. Facsimiles. Reviews:
  526. Donald D. Eddy, “‘Additional Copies Found in Cornell University Libraries’: An Unprinted Appendix to J. D. Fleeman's Bibliography,” The East-Central Intelligencer (May 2002): 27–28.
  527. D. D. Eddy and J. D. Fleeman, “A Preliminary Handlist of Books to which Dr. Samuel Johnson Subscribed,” Studies in Bibliography 46 (1993): 187–220. Reviews:
  528. Rodney Stenning Edgecombe, “Rasselas and Hardy's In Time of ‘The Breaking of Nations,’Thomas Hardy Journal 15, no. 3 (Oct. 1999): 109.
  529. Rodney Stenning Edgecombe, “Wordsworth's ‘I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,’” The Explicator 60, no. 3 (Spring 2002): 134–35.
  530. William Edinger, Johnson and Detailed Representation: The Significance of the Classical Sources (Victoria: Univ. of Victoria, 1997). Pp. 105. ELS Monograph Series no. 72. Reviews:
  531. William Edinger, “Eighteenth-Century Language Theory and Imlac's Tulip,” Hellas 7, no. 2 (1992): 171–91.
  532. David Edward, “Johnson, Boswell and the Conflict of Loyalties,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1995): 1–17.
  533. Gavin Edwards, “Why Are Human Wishes Vain? On Reading Samuel Johnson's The Vanity of Human Wishes,” Proceedings of the English Association of the North 2 (1986): 52–62.
  534. Gavin Edwards, “The Illegitimation of Richard Savage,” Sydney Studies in English 17 (1991–92), 67–74.
  535. Owen Dudley Edwards, “Rambling Sam: The Dr. Johnson Show, Southside Courtyard, Theatre,” The Scotsman, 17 Aug. 1997, p. FEST9. Brief extracts from Rambling Sam.
  536. Margaret Eliot and P. G. Suarez, Dr. Johnson Said... (London: Privately printed for the Trustees of Dr. Johnson's House by Thomas Harmsworth, 1988). Pp. ???.
  537. Helen Yvonne Elliott, “Johnson, Nature, and Women: The Early Years,” Dissertation Abstracts International 55, no. 9 (March 1995): 2840A. University of North Carolina, Greensboro.
  538. David Ellis, “Biography and Friendship: Johnson's Life of Savage,” in Imitating Art: Essays in Biography, ed. David Ellis (London: Pluto Press, 1993), pp. 19–35.
  539. Ben Elton and Richard Curtis, “Ink and Incapability,” episode 2 of Blackadder the Third. Produced by John Lloyd; directed by Mandie Fletcher; written by Ben Elton and Richard Curtis. The Prince Regent (Hugh Laurie) wants to become the patron of Johnson (Robbie Coltrane) for his Dictionary. After Baldrick (Tony Robinson) accidentally burns the sole manuscript, Blackadder (Rowan Atkinson) has to recreate the entire thing from scratch. Also includes appearances by a roguish group of poets, including Coleridge (Jim Sweeney), Shelley (Lee Cornes), and Byron (Steve Steen).
  540. Ann Engar, “Johnson in a Western Civilization Course,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 64–70.
  541. [Add to item 10/6:380] James Engell, ed., Johnson and His Age (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1984). Reviews:
  542. James Engell, “Coleridge, Johnson, and Shakespeare: A Critical Drama in Five Acts,” Romanticism 4, no. 1 (1998): 22–39.
  543. Mark English, “Samuel Johnson: A Portrait in OED-Antedatings,” N&Q 40, no. 3 (Sept. 1993): 331–34.
  544. William H. Epstein, Recognizing Biography (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 1987), chapter 4 (“Patronizing the Biographical Subject: Johnson's Life of Savage”), pp. 52–70; chapter 6 (“Recognizing the Biographer: Boswell's Life of Johnson”), pp. 90–137.
  545. William H. Epstein, “Professing the Eighteenth Century,” Profession (1985), pp. 10–15. On scholarly publishing, with Johnson and Boswell as examples.
  546. Ruthi Roth Erdman, “Rich Man, Poor Man, Beggar Man Thief: Samuel Johnson and the Economics of Poverty,” M.A. Thesis, Central Washington University, 1991. Not seen.
  547. Howard Erskine-Hill, “The Poet and Affairs of State in Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” Man and Nature/ L'Homme et la nature 6 (1987): 93–113.
  548. Howard Erskine-Hill, “The Political Character of Samuel Johnson: The Lives of the Poets and a Further Report on The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in The Jacobite Challenge, ed. Eveline Cruickshanks and Jeremy Black (Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers, 1988), pp. 161–76.
  549. Howard Erskine-Hill, “Johnson the Jacobite? A Response to the New Introduction to Donald Greene's The Politics of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 3–26.
  550. Howard Erskine-Hill, Poetry of Opposition and Revolution, Dryden to Wordsworth (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1996), chapter 4 (“The Decision of Samuel Johnson”), pp. 111–38; chapter 5 (”The Vanity of Human Wishes in Context”), pp. 139–66. Reviews:
  551. Howard Erskine-Hill, “A Kind of Liking for Jacobitism,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 3–13.
    A contribution to the argument over Johnson's Jacobite sympathies.
  552. Timothy Erwin, “Johnson's Life of Savage and Lockean Psychology,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 18 (1988): 199–212.
  553. Timothy Erwin, “Voltaire and Johnson Again: The Life of Savage and the Sertorius Letter (1744),” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 284 (1991): 211–23.
  554. Timothy Erwin, “On Teaching Johnson and Lockean Empiricism,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 35–41.
  555. Timothy Erwin, “Scribblers, Servants, and Johnson's Life of Savage,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 99–130.
  556. Hideichi Eto, “Samuel Johnson and the Gentleman's Magazine,” Musashino Bijutsu Daigaku kenkyu kiyo 20 (1990): 109. In Japanese.
  557. Scott David Evans, “Samuel Johnson's ‘General Nature’ in Its Context,” Dissertation Abstracts International 58, no. 11 (1997): A4278. Arizona State University.
  558. Scott D. Evans, Samuel Johnson's “General Nature”: Tradition and Transition in Eighteenth-Century Discourse (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1999). Reviews:
  559. David Fairer, “Thomas Warton and his Friends,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 36–37.
  560. David Fairer, “Dr. Johnson's Gift to Trinity College Library and the Dating of Letter 318,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 47–49.
  561. David Fairer, “The Awkward Johnson,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 145–63.
    Not seen???
  562. Arwa Mahmoud Fakhoury, “Transgression in Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” Dissertation Abstracts International, 61, no. 5 (Nov. 2000): 1850A. Not seen.
  563. Ron Farquhar, “Samuel Johnson at Oxford,” TLS 5795 (25 April 2014): 6.
    Letter to the editor, suggesting one reason Johnson left Oxford may have been that he “knew he was superior in both intelligence and learning to his tutors.”
  564. Faridoun Farrokh, “The Vanity of Human Wishes: Samuel Johnson and the Discovery of the Poetic Self,” in Selected Essays from the International Conference on Word and World of Discovery, ed. Gerald Garmon (Carrollton, GA: Department of English, West Georgia College, 1992), pp. 50–60.
  565. Stuart Feder, “Transference Attended the Birth of the Modern Biography,” American Imago 54, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 399–415. On Johnson's Life of Savage.
  566. Paul Fenouillet and Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Samuel Johnson in Post-Revolutionary France,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 43–48. Includes the text and translation of a poem on Johnson by Rose-Cêleste Bache Vien, “Samuel Johnson, ou le 21 Novembre.”
  567. Jan Fergus, “The Provincial Buyers of Johnson's Dictionary and its Alternatives,” The New Rambler, D:6 (1990–91), 3–5.
  568. Gillian Ferguson, “Boswell the Philanderer Rides Again,” The Sunday Times, 8 Aug. 1993. Not seen. Interview with John Sessions on BBC2's Tour of the Western Isles.
  569. William Ferguson, “Samuel Johnson's Views on Scottish Gaelic Culture,” Scottish Historical Review 77 (Oct. 1998): 183–98.
  570. Karin Fernald, “Fanny Burney and the Witlings,” The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 38–50.
  571. Karin Fernald, “Mrs Piozzi and the Millennium,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 49–57.
  572. Bonita Mae Ferrero, “Reconstructing the Canon: Samuel Johnson and the Universal Visiter,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 8 (Feb. 1991): 2751A. University of Connecticut. Not seen.
  573. Bonnie Ferrero, “Samuel Johnson and Arthur Murphy: Curious Intersections and Deliberate Divergence,” ELN 28, no. 3 (March 1991): 18–24.
  574. Bonnie Ferrero, “Johnson, Murphy, and Macbeth,” Review of English Studies 42, no. 166 (May 1991): 228–32.
  575. Bonnie Ferrero, Reconstructing the Canon: Samuel Johnson and the Universal Visiter (New York: Peter Lang, 1993). Pp. 146.
  576. Bonnie Ferrero, “Samuel Johnson, Richard Rolt, and the Universal Visiter,” Review of English Studies, 44, no. 174 (May 1993): 176–86. Reprinted in Ashgate Critical Essays on Early English Lexicographers, Volume 5: The Eighteenth Century, ed. Anne McDermott (Farnham: Ashgate, 2012), pp. 341–51.
  577. Bonnie Ferrero, “Alexander Chalmers and the Canon of Samuel Johnson,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 22 (1999): 173–86.
  578. David Ferry, “What Johnson Means to Me,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 7–10.
  579. David Ferry, “What Johnson Means to Me,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 262–67.
    Not seen???
  580. Claude Fierobe, “Rasselas: Le Decor voile de l'impossible utopie,” La Licorne 10 (1986): 45–54. In French.
  581. G. J. Finch, “Reason, Imagination and Will in Rasselas and The Vanity of Human Wishes,” English: The Journal of the English Association 38, no. 162 (Autumn 1989): 195–209.
  582. Leon G. Fine, “Samuel Johnson's Illnesses,” Journal of Nephrology 19, suppl. 10 (May–June 2006): 110–14.
    [Author's abstract:] The handwritten note of the post-mortem examination of Dr Samuel Johnson resides in the library of the Royal College of Physicians of London. Headed “asthma” it suggests that he had only one functioning kidney, probably had hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and congestive heart failure. This article describes an imaginary presentation by Dr James Wilson, who did the autopsy, and alludes to Johnson's life, and medical history, including impaired vision and hearing, scrofula, abnormal limb movement, gout, abdominal cramps, melancholia and episodes of “asthma” which were, more than likely to have been episodes of left ventricular failure. Johnson's personality as a demanding patient who took things into his own hands are described based upon reports from his physicians. Not seen.
  583. Stephen Fix, “The Contexts and Motives of Johnson's Life of Milton,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 107–32.
  584. Stephen Fix, “Teaching Johnson's Critical Writing,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 128–34.
  585. Stephen Fix, “Prayer, Poetry, and Paradise Lost: Samuel Johnson as Reader of Milton's Christian Epic,” in Seeing into the Life of Things: Essays on Literature and Religious Experience, ed. John L. Mahoney (New York: Fordham Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 126–51.
  586. Irene Fizer, “Emballing, Empalling, Embalming, and Embailing Anne Bullen: The Annotation of Shakespeare's Bawdy Tongue after Samuel Johnson,” in Reading Readings: Essays on Shakespeare Editing in the Eighteenth Century, ed. Joanna Gondris (Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 281–95.
  587. Richard F. Fleck, “Samuel Johnson's Rasselas: A Perspective on Islam,” Weber Studies 10, no. 1 (Winter 1993): 50–57.
  588. [Add to item 1/3:32] J. D. Fleeman, ed., A Preliminary Handlist of Copies of Books Associated with Dr. Samuel Johnson (Oxford: Oxford Bibliographic Society, 1984). Reviews:
  589. J. D. Fleeman, “Dr. Johnson and ‘Miss Fordice,’” N&Q 33 (March 1986): 59–60.
  590. David Fleeman, “Johnson's Dictionary (1755),” Trivium 22 (Summer 1987): 83–88.
  591. J. D. Fleeman, “Memorabilia,” N&Q 36, no. 1 (March 1989): 1–5.
  592. J. D. Fleeman, “Johnson and Boswell in Scotland,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 51–72.
  593. J. D. Fleeman, “Uttoxeter Commemorative Address,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 77–80.
  594. J. D. Fleeman, The Genesis of Johnson's Dictionary (Harlow, Essex, England: Longman, 1990). Part of the Longman facsimile edition of Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language.
  595. J. D. Fleeman, “Johnson in the Schoolroom: George Fulton's Miniature Dictionary (1821),” in An Index of Civilisation: Studies of Printing and Publishing History in Honour of Keith Maslen, ed. Ross Harvey, Wallace Kirsop, and B. J. McMullin (Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Center for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash Univ., 1993), pp. 163–71.
  596. J. D. Fleeman, “Johnson's Shakespeare (1765): The Progress of a Subscription,” in Writers, Books, and Trade, ed. O M Brack, Jr. (New York: AMS Press, 1994), pp. 355–65.
  597. J. D. Fleeman, “Johnson's Secret,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 147–50.
    A reply to Greene's argument about the leter M in Johnson's diaries.
  598. J. D. Fleeman, “Michael Johnson, the ‘Lichfield Librarian,’” Publishing History 39 (1996): 23–44.
  599. J. D. Fleeman with James McLaverty, A Bibliography of the Works of Samuel Johnson, Treating His Published Works from the Beginnings to 1984 2 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000). Vol. 1: 1731–1759; vol. 2: 1759–1787, Pp. 1,972.
    A monumental bibliography of Johnson's works, a project to which Fleeman devoted much of his career. McLaverty completed the bibliography upon Fleeman's death, and maintains a running list of corrections and additions on the Web.
    Reviews:
  600. Susan Adele Fleming, “Mary Shelley and Samuel Johnson: Social and Ethical Implications of the Individual's Pursuit of Perfection,” M.A. Thesis, Auburn University, 1990. Not seen.
  601. Loraine Fletcher, “Charlotte Smith and the Lichfield Two,” The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 51–61.
  602. William Fletcher, “Dr Johnson and the Seven Provinces,” The New Rambler D:2 (1986–87), 27–36. On Johnson and Dutch languages, culture, and history.
  603. Timothy Jon Florschuetz, “An Examination of the Nile River in Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia,” M.A. Thesis, Arizona State University, 1991. Not seen.
  604. Robert Folkenflik, “Rasselas and the Closed Field,” Huntington Library Quarterly 57 (1994): 337–52.
  605. Robert Folkenflik, “Samuel Johnson,” in Encyclopædia Britannica 15th ed. (Chicago: Encyclopædia Britannica, 1995). Also available through Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
  606. Robert Folkenflik, “Johnson's Politics,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 102–13.
  607. Robert Folkenflik, “Samuel Johnson: The Return of the Jacobites and Other Topics,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 33, no. 2 (Winter 2000): 289–99. Review essay on several recent studies of Johnson.
  608. Alexander Malcolm Forbes, “The Measure and the Choice: Empiricism and Revelation in Johnson's ‘Vanity of Human Wishes,’ ‘Rambler,’ and ‘Rasselas,’” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 4 (Oct. 1990): 1238A. Not seen.
  609. Alexander M. Forbes, “Johnson, Blackstone, and the Tradition of Natural Law,” Mosaic 27, no. 4 (Dec. 1994): 81–98.
  610. Alexander M. Forbes, “Ultimate Reality and Ethical Meaning: Theological Utilitarianism in Eighteenth-Century England,” Ultimate Reality and Meaning 18, no. 2 (1995): 119–38.
  611. Helen Forsyth, “Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler, C:25 (1984): 27. Poem.
  612. Helen Forsyth, “Samuel Johnson,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), p. vii. Sonnet on Johnson, reprinted from above.
  613. Ra Foxton, “A Johnsonian Heritage: The Hussey Copy of Boswell's Life,” Eighteenth-Century News (Melbourne), 24 (1985): 9–17.
  614. Roslyn Reso Foy, “Johnson's Rasselas: Women in the ‘Stream of Life,’” ELN 32, no. 1 (Sept. 1994): 39–53.
  615. Peter France, “Western Civilization and Its Mountain Frontiers,” History of European Ideas 6, no. 3 (1985): 297–310.
  616. Marina Frasca-Spada, “Books and the Imagination: Arabella, David Hume and the Eighteenth-Century Readers of History and Fiction,” The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 23–31.
  617. Michael Fraser, “Chaucer, Johnson, and Shakespeare on CD-ROM,” Computers & Texts 12 (July 1996): 21–25. Review essay on Anne McDermott's edition of the Dictionary on CD-ROM.
  618. Russell Fraser, “What is Augustan Poetry?” Sewanee Review 98, no. 4 (Fall 1990): 620–85.
  619. Ian Frazier, “Boswell's Life of Don Johnson,” The New Yorker 62 (15 Sept. 1986): 32. Parody of Boswell's Life about television actor Don Johnson.
  620. Bruce Allen Freeberg, “Samuel Johnson,” chapter 3 of “The Problem of Divine Ideas in Eighteenth-Century Immaterialism: A Comparative Study of the Philosophies of George Berkeley, Samuel Johnson, Arthur Collier, and Jonathan Edwards,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 11 (May 2000): 4034A. Emory Univ. Not seen.
  621. Carl Freedman, “London as Science Fiction: A Note on Some Images from Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Dickens, and Orwell,” Extrapolation 43, no. 3 (2002): 251–62.
  622. Arthur Freeman, “Affection's Eye,” TLS 5434 (25 May 2007): 13.
    Freeman suggests a death notice of Robert Levet in the Gentleman's Magazine for Jan. 1782 was by SJ and had escaped Fleeman's notice in his Bibliography.
  623. Annette French, “Monuments and Communal Memory: Johnson and Public Sculpture,” The New Rambler E:7 (2003–4): 68–77.
  624. Ronald H. Fritze, “The Oxford English Dictionary: A Brief History,” Reference Services Review 17, no. 3 (1989): 61–70.
  625. Raymond-Jean Frontain, “Johnson in the British Literature Survey Course,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 56–63.
  626. Alan Frost, “‘Very Little Intellectual in the Course’: Exploration and Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 6 (2002): 44–51.
  627. Tetsu Fujii, “James Boswell Reconstructed from Various Editions of the Encyclopaedia Britannica,” The Bulletin of Central Research Institute: Fukuoka University, 116 (1989): 29–60. In Japanese.
  628. Tetsu Fujii, “Johnson's ‘Roscommon’ in the 18th Century,” Sophia English Studies 16 (1991): 3–18.
  629. Tetsu Fujii, “An Essay concerning How Dr. Johnson's ‘Life of Collins’ Exerted Influence in the 18th Century,” Fukuoka University Review of Literature & Humanities 24 (1993): 1233–63. In Japanese.
  630. Tetsu Fujii, “How Samuel Johnson Has Been Described in Successive Editions of the Encyclopaedia Britannica,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century English Literature, ed. The Johnson Society of Japan (Tokyo: Yusho-Do, 1996): 71–91.
  631. Tetsu Fujii, “A List of Johnson and Boswell Studies in Japan: Those Published in Book Form from 1871 to 1997,” The Bulletin of Central Research Institute of Fukuoka University 208 (1998): 39–122. In Japanese.
  632. Tetsu Fujii, “Invitation to ‘Johnson Studies in Japan,’” in Translations in the Meiji Era 13: Eighteenth Century English Literature (Tokyo: Ozorasha, 2000), pp. 342–44. In Japanese.
  633. Tetsu Fujii, “A Supplementary List of Johnson and Boswell Studies in Japan: Those Published in Book Form from 1946 to 2000,” The Bulletin of Central Research Institute: Fukuoka University 234 (2000): 19–58. In Japanese.
  634. Tetsu Fujii, “A List of Textual Differences between the First and the Second Editions of the Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. by Sir John Hawkins,” The Bulletin of Central Research Institute: Fukuoka University 247 (2001): 1–37.
  635. Tetsu Fujii, “The Johnson Centre of the Birmingham University,” The Rising Generation (Tokyo: Kenkyusha), 146, no. 12 (March 2001): 53. In Japanese.
  636. Tetsu Fujii, “A Note on a Variant Copy of Hawkins's ‘The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.,’” Notes & Queries 48, no. 4 (Dec. 2001): 429–30.
  637. Tetsu Fujii, “Why Chalmers?: A Note on a Life of Hawkins,” Notes & Queries 246, no. 4 (2001): 433–34.
  638. Tetsu Fujii, “Historical Review of the Studies on Sir John Hawkins's The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.,” in Festschrift for Professor Shun'ichi Takayanagi (Tokyo: Kenkyusha, 2002), pp. 121–40. In Japanese.
  639. Tetsu Fujii, “On the Addition of Two Pages Sir John Hawkins Made for the Second Edition of The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.,” in Studies in Eighteenth-Century English Literature 2, ed. The Johnson Society of Japan (Tokyo: Kaitakusha, 2002), pp. 288–304. In Japanese. Not seen.
  640. Tetsu Fujii, “A List of Johnson and Boswell Studies in Japan (3): Those Published in University Bulletins and Others from 1878 to 2002,” The Bulletin of Central Research Institute of Fukuoka University 2, no. 9 (March 2003): 105–222.
  641. Tim Fulford, Landscape, Liberty and Authority: Poetry, Criticism and Politics from Thomson to Wordsworth (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1996), chapter 2 (“Johnson: The Usurpations of Virility”), pp. 73–115
  642. Dwight C. Gabbard, “The Drudgery of Wit — Samuel Johnson as an Engineer of Language,” M.A. Thesis, San Francisco State University, 1993. Not seen.
  643. Jose Angel Garcia Landa, “Samuel Johnson's Rasselas: The Duplicity of Choice and the Sense of an Ending,” Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses 19–20 (Nov. 1989-April 1990): 75–99.
  644. Jose Angel Garcia Landa, “‘The Enthusiastick Fit’: The Function and Fate of the Poet in Johnson's Rasselas,” Cuadernos de investigacion filologica 17, nos. 1–2 (1991): 103–26. Not seen.
  645. Lyn Gardner, “Sammy and Rosie Get Laid: Dr Johnson's Brothel Antics Leave Lyn Gardner Unconvinced,” The Guardian, 6 Jan. 2001, p. 5. Review of Charles Thomas's play.
  646. Howard Gaskill, “What Did James MacPherson Really Leave on Display at His Publisher's Shop in 1762?” Scottish Gaelic Studies 16 (Winter 1990): 67–89.
  647. Genevieve Gebhart, “‘A Violent Passion’: Pugnacity and the Prizefighting Phenomenon in Johnson's England — A Montage,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 3 (1999): 37–57.
  648. Genny Gebhardt, “‘A Violent Passion’: Pugnacity and the Prizefighting Phenomenon in Johnson's England,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 3–16.
  649. Genny Gebhardt, “Reflections on the Death Mask of Samuel Johnson Exhibited at Dr. Johnson's House in Gough Square,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 32–33.
  650. Genevieve Gebhardt, “Rough Music: Guerrilla Theatre and Public Protest in Johnson's London,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 7 (2005): 37–64. Not seen.
  651. John Geirland, “Doctor Feelgood: Stricken by ‘Vile Melancholy,’ the 18th-Century Critic and Raconteur Samuel Johnson Pioneered a Modern Therapy,” Smithsonian 37, no. 10 (Jan. 2007): 97–103.
    A brief biographical overview, with an argument that SJ's attempts to ward off his melancholy anticipated modern cognitive-behavioral therapy.
  652. Jaclyn Geller, “The Unnarated Life: Samuel Johnson, Female Friendship, and the Rise of the Novel Revisited,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 80–98.
  653. Jaclyn Geller, “‘Conjugal Vexations’: Samuel Johnson's Marriage Critique,” chapter 2 of “Domestic Counterplots: Representations of Marriage in Eighteenth-Century British Literature,” Ph.D. dissertation, New York University, 2003, pp. 95–165.
  654. Mark Gellis, “Burke, Campbell, Johnson, and Priestley: A Rhetorical Analysis of Four British Pamphlets of the American Revolution,” Dissertation Abstracts International 54, no. 7 (1993): 2555A. Purdue University. Not seen.
  655. Christine Gerrard, The Patriot Opposition to Walpole: Politics, Poetry, and National Myth, 1725–1742 (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1995), chapter 8 (“Jacobites and Patriots: Johnson and Savage”).
  656. Denis Gibbs, “Dr Richard Wilkes ‘MD’ (1691–1760): Physician of Willenhall and Antiquary of Staffordshire,” The New Rambler E:7 (2003–4): 46–53.
  657. R. B. Gill, “The Enlightened Occultist: Beckford's Presence in Vathek,” in Vathek and the Escape from Time: Bicentenary Revaluations, ed. Kenneth W. Graham (New York: AMS, 1990), pp. 131–43.
  658. Thomas B. Gilmore, “Implicit Criticism of Thomson's Seasons in Johnson's Dictionary,” Modern Philology 86, no. 3 (Feb. 1989): 265–73.
  659. Hal Gladfelder, “The Hard Work of Doing Nothing: Richard Savage's Parallel Lives,” Modern Language Quarterly 64, no. 4 (Dec. 2003): 445–72. Not seen.
  660. John Glendening, “Young Fanny Burney and the Mentor,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 281–312.
  661. John Glendening, “Northern Exposures: English Literary Tours of Scotland, 1720–1820,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53 (1993): 3221A. Not seen.
  662. Stephen L. Glover, “‘Trumpet’ in Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language (1755),” ITG Journal 22, no. 4 (1998): 40–43.
  663. Susan Paterson Glover, “The Real Slim Shady and Samuel J.,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 9–12. On teaching Johnson's works at the University of Toronto.
  664. Christina Eleanor Godlewski, “‘It Matters Not How a Man Dies, but How He Lives’: Samuel Johnson and the Rhetoric of Consolation,” M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland at College Park, 1992. Not seen.
  665. Joel J. Gold, “The Failure of Johnson's Irene: Death by Antithesis,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 201–14.
  666. Joel J. Gold, “Literate Conversation, Scholarship, and ‘Clubbability’: High Spots and Low among Johnsonians of the Midwest,” Chronicle of Higher Education 34, no. 46 (27 July 1988): 82–83.
  667. Gerald Goldberg, “Sale of Johnsonian Books and Manuscripts,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 49–51.
  668. Gerald Goldberg, “Collector's Corner: Boswell to His Brother,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 47–48.
  669. Michael Goldberg, “‘Demigods and Philistines’: Macaulay and Carlyle — A Study in Contrasts,” Studies in Scottish Literature 24 (1989): 116–28.
  670. Richard L. Golden, “Medicine & Numismatics: Samuel Johnson and the Golden Angel,” The Numismatist 109, no. 4 (1 April 1996): 411.
  671. Bertrand A. Goldgar, “Imitation and Plagiarism: The Lauder Affair and Its Critical Aftermath,” Studies in the Literary Imagination 34, no. 1 (2001): 1–16.
  672. James O. Goldsborough, “Summertime and a Chance to Visit One of the World's Great Men of Letters,” The San Diego Union-Tribune, 8 July 1999, p. B13.
  673. Stephen Goode, “A Generous and Elevated Mind,” Insight on the News 16, no. 16 (1 May 2000): 4. On quotations of Johnson in the new Oxford Dictionary of Quotations.
  674. Allegra S. Goodman, “Virtuous Philosophers and Chameleon Poet: The Shakespeare of Samuel Johnson and John Keats,” Dissertation Abstracts International 58, no. 7 (1997): 2667A. Stanford University. Not seen.
  675. Stephen Goodwin, “Dr. Johnson's Gem in Peril,” The Independent, 4 Nov. 1996, p. 9. Newhailes House, praised by Johnson as “the most learned drawing-room in Europe,” threatened with destruction.
  676. Adam Gopnik, “Man of Fetters: Dr. Johnson and Mrs. Thrale,” The New Yorker, 8 Dec. 2008, pp. 90–96.
    A long review essay prompted by the Johnson biographies by Peter Martin and Jeffrey Meyers, with a glance at Ian McIntyre's Hester. It develops into a wide-ranging essay on Johnson's life and friendships.
  677. Scott Paul Gordon, “A Note on Reynolds's ‘The Infant Johnson,’” Johnsonian News Letter 47, nos. 3–4 (Sept.–Dec. 1988): 16.
  678. Henry Gordon-Clark, “Johnson and Savage,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2 (1997): 1–5.
  679. Henry Gordon-Clark, “Was Johnson a Thief?: Plagiarism in the Account of the Life of Richard Savage,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 3 (1999): 59–67.
  680. Andrew Scott Graham, “Johnson, Law and Literature,” M.A. thesis, Bucknell University, 2005. Pp. v + 95. Not seen.
  681. G. Graustein, “‘What Do You Read My Lord?’ Samuel Johnson Quoting Jonathan Swift,” Zeitschrift fü Anglistik und Amerikanistik 48, no. 2 (2000): 137–50.
  682. James Gray, “Auctor et Auctoritas: Dr. Johnson's Views on the Authority of Authorship,” English Studies in Canada, 12, no. 3 (Sept. 1986): 269–84.
  683. James Gray, “‘A Native of the Rocks’: Johnson's Handling of the Theme of Love,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 106–22.
  684. James Gray, “Johnson's Portraits of Charles XII of Sweden,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 70–84.
  685. James Gray, “‘The Athenian Blockheads’: New Light on Johnson's Oxford,” The New Rambler D:3 (1987–88), 30–45.
  686. James Gray, “Dr Johnson and the Theatre,” The New Rambler D:4 (1988–89), 37–38.
  687. James Gray, “Johnson, Cromwell, and the Jacobite Cause,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 90–153.
  688. James Gray, “Some Thoughts on the Eighteenth Century Response to Miracles,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 4–5.
  689. James Gray, “Home of the Athenian Blockheads: Guidebook Glimpses of Johnson's Oxford,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 74–83.
  690. James Gray and T. J. Murray, “Dr. Johnson and Dr. James,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 213–46.
    On Johnson's friendship with the famous medical doctor.
  691. Stephen Gray, “Johnson's Use of Some African Myths in Rasselas,” Standpunte 38, no. 2 (April 1985): 16–23.
  692. Jonathon Green, “Samuel Johnson: The Pivotal Moment,” in Chasing the Sun: Dictionary Makers and the Dictionaries They Made (New York: Henry Holt, 1996), pp. 251–83.
  693. Jonathon Green, “The Higher Plagiarism,” Critical Quarterly 44, no. 1 (2002): 97–102. Not seen.
  694. Julien Green, Suite anglaise (Paris: Editions du Seuil, 1988). Pp. 125. In French.
  695. Mary Elizabeth Green, “Defoe and Johnson in Scotland,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 20 (1990): 303–15.
  696. Donald Greene, “Samuel Johnson,” in The Craft of Literary Biography, ed. Jeffrey Meyers (New York: Schocken Books, 1985), pp. 9–32.
  697. Donald Greene, “Samuel Johnson, Psychobiographer: The Life of Richard Savage,” in The Biographer's Art: New Essays, ed. Jeffrey Meyers (London: Macmillan, 1987): 11–30.
  698. [Add to item 2:44] Donald Greene, The Oxford Authors: Samuel Johnson (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1984). Reviews:
  699. Donald Greene, “Johnsonian Punctuation,” Johnsonian News Letter 47, nos. 3–4 (Sept.–Dec. 1988): 7–9. On the punctuation of the letter to Chesterfield.
  700. Donald Greene, Samuel Johnson updated ed. (Boston: Twayne, 1989). Pp. xvii + 206.
  701. Donald Greene, The Politics of Samuel Johnson, 2nd ed. (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1990). Pp. lxxix + 356. Reviews:
  702. Donald Greene, “Housman and Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 48, no. 3–49, no. 2 (Sept. 1988–June 1989): 24–26.
  703. Donald Greene, “The Logia of Samuel Johnson and the Quest for the Historical Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 1–33. Reprinted in The Selected Essays of Donald Greene, ed. John L. Abbott (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2004), pp. 211–40.
  704. Donald Greene, “Johnson's Doctorate,” TLS, 14–20 Sept. 1990, p. 974.
  705. Donald Greene, “Samuel Johnson,” TLS, 23 Aug. 1991, p. 13. On the authenticity of Johnson's “Opera: an Exotick and Irrational Entertainment.”
  706. Donald Greene, “‘A Secret Far Dearer to Him than His Life’: Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’ Reconsidered,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 1–40. Reprinted in The Selected Essays of Donald Greene ed. John L. Abbott (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2004), pp. 173–210.
    Greene, reviewing the evidence offered by Katherine C. Balderston in “Johnson's Vile Melancholy” (1949), argues that the “mysterious letter M” in Johnson's diaries alludes to masturbation.
  707. Donald Greene, “Johnson's ‘Saintdom’: A Note,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1992): 43–44.
  708. Donald Greene, “The Myth of Johnson's Misogyny: Some Addenda,” South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 6–17.
  709. Donald Greene, “Johnson on Columbus,” Johnsonian News Letter 52, no. 2–53, no. 2 (June 1992–June 1993): 23–25.
  710. Donald Greene, “The World's Worst Biography,” The American Scholar 62, no. 3 (Summer 1993): 365–82.
  711. Donald Greene, “Progress towards Where? Conservation of What?” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 88–102. Response to Nagashima, “Progressive or Conservative? Two Trends in Johnson Studies.”
  712. Donald Greene, “Catholicism in Johnson's Lobo,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1994): 12–18.
  713. Donald Greene, “Was Dr Johnson Really a Jacobite?” TLS, 18 Aug. 1995, pp. 13–14.
  714. Donald Greene, “Samuel Johnson and Jacobitism,” TLS, 13 Oct. 1995, p. 19.
  715. Donald Greene, “Johnson: The Jacobite Legend Exhumed: A Rejoinder to Howard Erskine-Hill and J. C. D. Clark,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 57–136.
    Greene's feisty reply to Clark and Erskine-Hill's suggestion that Johnson was a Jacobite.
  716. Donald Greene, “Samuel Johnson's ‘Body Language’: A New Perspective,” in Enlightened Groves: Essays in Honour of Professor Zenzo Suzuki, ed. Eiichi Hara, Hiroshi Ozawa, and Peter Robinson (Tokyo: Shohakusha, 1996), pp. 240–62.
  717. Donald Greene, “Jonathan Clark and the Abominable Cultural Mind-Set,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 71–88.
    Further arguments against the thesis that Johnson was sympathetic to Jacobitism.
  718. Donald Greene, “Dr Johnson's Charity,” TLS, 2 May 1997, p. 17.
  719. Donald Greene, “‘Beyond Probability’: A Boswellian Act of Faith,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 47–80. A response to Burke, “Boswell and the Text of Johnson's Logia.”
  720. Donald Greene, The Selected Essays of Donald Greene, ed. John L. Abbott (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2004). Pp. 355.
    Thirteen previously published essays, ranging from 1952 to 1990, many on Johnsonian topics. Essays on Johnson are listed separately.
    Reviews:
  721. Donald Greene and John A. Vance, Chief Glories: The Life of Samuel Johnson on Proper Study: The Life of Alexander Pope; and Chief Glories: The Life of Samuel Johnson (Research Triangle Park, N.C.: National Humanities Center, 1985). Audio disk: interviews with Greene and Vance on side B. Side A features Maynard Mack on Pope. Not seen.
  722. Donald Greene and John A. Vance, A Bibliography of Johnsonian Studies, 1970–1985 (Victoria: Univ. of Victoria, 1987). Pp. vi + 116. Reviews:
  723. Dustin Griffin, “Johnson's Lives of the Poets and the Patronage System,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 1–33.
  724. Dustin Griffin, Literary Patronage in England, 1650–1800 (New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1996): chapter 9, pp. 220–45.
  725. Dustin Griffin, “Regulated Loyalty: Jacobitism and Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 1007–27.
  726. Robert John Griffin, “Samuel Johnson and the Act of Reflection,” Dissertation Abstracts International 46, no. 11 (May 1986): 3358A. Not seen.
  727. Robert J. Griffin, “Reflection as Criterion in The Lives of the Poets,” Dr. Samuel Johnson and James Boswell, ed. Harold Bloom (New York: Chelsea, 1986), pp. 239–62.
  728. Robert J. Griffin, “The Age of ‘The Age of’ Is Over: Johnson and New Versions of the Late Eighteenth Century,” Modern Language Quarterly 62, no. 4 (Dec. 2001): 377–91.
  729. Philip Mahone Griffith, “Samuel Johnson and King Charles the Martyr: Veneration in the Dictionary,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 235–61.
  730. Philip Mahone Griffith, “Boswell's Johnson and the Stephens (Leslie Stephen and Virginia Woolf),” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 151–64.
    A survey of Stephen's and Woolf's interest in Johnson.
  731. Nick Groom, “Percy and Johnson,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 39–48.
  732. Nick Groom, “Samuel Johnson and Truth: A Response to Curley,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 197–201.
    Groom responds to Curley's “Samuel Johnson and Truth,” suggesting that Curley's evidence is familiar, and that notions of “forgery” have to be reconsidered.
  733. Gloria Sybil Gross, “Johnson and the Uses of Enchantment,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 299–311.
  734. Gloria Sybil Gross, “‘A Child Is Being Beaten’: Suggestions toward a Psychoanalytical Reading of Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 181–218.
  735. Gloria Gross, “Mentoring Jane Austen: Reflections on ‘My Dear Dr. Johnson,’” Persuasions: Journal of the Jane Austen Society of North America 11 (16 Dec. 1989): 53–60.
  736. Gloria Sybil Gross, This Invisible Riot of the Mind: Samuel Johnson's Psychological Theory (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 1992). Pp. x + 198. Reviews:
  737. Gloria Sybil Gross, “Reading Johnson Psychoanalytically,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 49–55.
  738. Gloria Sybil Gross, “In a Fast Coach with a Pretty Woman: Jane Austen and Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 199–253.
    A survey of Johnson's influence on Jane Austen, developed into a book-length work with the same title.
  739. Gloria Sybil Gross, In a Fast Coach with a Pretty Woman: Jane Austen and Samuel Johnson (New York: AMS Press, 2002). Pp. ix + 208.
    The most thorough survey of Johnson's influence on Jane Austen.
    Reviews:
  740. Isobel Grundy, ed., Samuel Johnson: New Critical Essays (London: Vision; New York: Barnes & Noble, 1984). Pp. 208. Reviews:
  741. Isobel Grundy, “The Stability of Truth,” The New Rambler C:25 (1984): 35–44.
  742. Isobel Grundy, Samuel Johnson and the Scale of Greatness (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1986). Pp. 278. Reviews:
  743. Isobel Grundy, “Samuel Johnson as Patron of Women,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 59–77.
  744. Isobel Grundy, “Swift and Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 154–80.
  745. Isobel Grundy, “Celebrare domestica facta: Johnson and Home Life,” The New Rambler D:6 (1990–91), 6–14.
  746. Isobel Grundy, “Restoration and Eighteenth Century (1660–1780),” in An Outline of English Literature, ed. Pat Rogers (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1992), pp. 200–49.
  747. Isobel Grundy, “A Note on Johnson's Charles, Shakespeare's Caesar,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 51.
  748. Isobel Grundy, “‘Over Him We Hang Vibrating’: Uncertainty in the Life of Johnson,” in Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters, ed. Irma S. Lustig (Lexington, KY: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995), pp. 184–202.
  749. Isobel Grundy, “Johnson's Bookman,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 393–404. Review essay on Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): ed. David L. Vander Meulen.
  750. Isobel Grundy, “‘This Is Worse than Swift!’: Johnson as Speaker of the Unacceptable,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 1 (March 2007): 6–17.
    Grundy's address to the Johnsonians in Sept. 2006, on his fondness for raising shocking or uncomfortable topics in conversation.
  751. Isobel Grundy, “Early Women Reading Johnson,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 207–24.
    Not seen???
  752. Peter Gruner, “Flocking to the Shrine of Dr Johnson, the Great Debunker,” Evening Standard, 20 Nov. 1992, p. 16.
  753. Lia Guerra, “Unexpected Symmetries: Samuel Johnson and Mary Wollstonecraft on the Northern Road,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 18, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2005): 93–106. Not seen.
  754. John Guillory, “The English Common Place: Lineages of the Topographical Genre,” Critical Quarterly 33, no. 4 (Winter 1991): 3–27.
  755. Daniel P. Gunn, “The Lexicographer's Task: Language, Reason, and Idealism in Johnson's Dictionary Preface,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 105–24.
  756. David Gunto, “Kicking the Emperor: Some Problems of Restoration Parallel History,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 3 (1997): 109–27.
  757. Bonnie J. Gunzenhauser, “Re-Viewing Romantic Writers and Readers: Using Samuel Johnson to Contextualize Romantic Ideology,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 15–18.
  758. John T. Guthrie, “Research: An Uncloistered Curriculum,” Journal of Reading 24, no. 2 (1980), 188–89. On using Boswell's Life in the reading classroom.
  759. Henning Hagerup, “King Sam: Om Samuel Johnson som kritiker,” Vagant 2 (2000): 35–44. Not seen. In Norwegian.
  760. Jean H. Hagstrum, “Samuel Johnson among the Deconstructionists,” The Georgia Review 39, no. 3 (Fall 1985): 537–47.
  761. Jean H. Hagstrum, “Samuel Johnson among the Deconstructionists,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 112–24.
  762. R. Carter Hailey, “Hidden Quarto Editions of Johnson's Dictionary,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 228–39.
  763. Bonnie Hain and Carole McAllister, “James Boswell's Ms. Perceptions and Samuel Johnson's Ms. Placed Friends,” South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 59–70.
  764. William H. Halewood, “The Majesty of The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 256–68.
  765. Dennis Hall, “On Idleness: Dr. Johnson on Millennial Malaise,” Kentucky Philological Review 15 (2001): 28–32. Not seen.
  766. Dennis R. Hall, “Signs of Life in the Eighteenth-Century: Dr. Johnson and the Invention of Popular Culture,” Kentucky Philological Review 19 (2005): 12–16. Not seen.
  767. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D., “The Example of Samuel Johnson,” chapter 18 of Worry: Controlling It and Using It Wisely (New York: Pantheon, 1997): 216–35.
  768. Alan Hamilton, “Dr Johnson's City of Philosophers Still Satisfies the Inquisitive Walker,” The Times, 5 Aug. 1995, Home news.
  769. Ian Hamilton, Keepers of the Flame: Literary Estates and the Rise of Biography (Pimlico, 1994). Pp. viii + 344.
  770. Deborah Hammons, “How Spelling Came to Be,” Christian Science Monitor, 26 May 1998, p. 16.
  771. Michael Hancher, “Bailey and After: Illustrating Meaning,” Word and Image 8, no. 1 (1992): 1–20.
  772. Sally N. Hand, “The ‘Finest Bit of Blue’: Samuel Johnson and the Bluestocking Assemblies,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 6–18.
  773. Patrick Hanks, “Johnson and Modern Lexicography,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 243–66.
  774. Brian Joseph Hanley, “Samuel Johnson's Military Writings,” M.A. Thesis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1992. Not seen.
  775. Brian Hanley, “Colonel Gimbel and the Literary Anvil: or Why Dr Johnson's Letters Belong to the U.S. Airforce Academy's Aeronautical Collection,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 83–87.
  776. Brian Hanley, “Johnson's Contemporary Reputation,” The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 56–62.
  777. Brian Hanley, “The Prevailing Moral Tone of Johnson's Military Commentary,” The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 39–45.
  778. Brian Hanley, “An Examination of Samuel Johnson's Book Reviews, 1742–1764,”M.Litt. thesis, Univ. of Oxford, 1998.
  779. Brian Hanley, “Henry Fielding, Samuel Johnson, Samuel Richardson, and the Reception of Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote in the Popular Press,” ANQ 13, no. 3 (2000): 27–32.
  780. Brian Hanley, Samuel Johnson as Book Reviewer: A Duty to Examine the Labors of the Learned (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2001). Pp. 293. Reviews:
  781. Brian Hanley, “Modernity's ‘Mr. Rambler’: Tobias Wolff's Exploration of Vanity and Self-Deception in The Night in Question,” Papers on Language & Literature 39, no. 2 (Spring 2003): 144–61.
  782. Noriyuki Harada, “Regeneration from Vanity: Johnson's Satiric Mode in The Vanity of Human Wishes,” Studies in English Literature (Tokyo), 73, no. 2 (1997): 265–78.
  783. Noriyuki Harada, “Individuality in Johnson's Shakespeare Criticism,” in Japanese Studies in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries, ed. Yoshiko Kawachi (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1998), pp. 197–212. Not seen.
  784. Noriyuki Harada, “From Verse to Prose: Samuel Johnson's Failure in Irene Reconsidered,” Poetica: An International Journal of Linguistic-Literary Studies 53 (2000): 39–64. Not seen.
  785. Noriyuki Harada, “Tanjun na hanashi (12): Jonson,” Eigo Seinen 147, no. 12 (March 2002): 742. In Japanese. Not seen.
  786. Noriyuki Harada, “Dokushosuru keimoshugi,” Eigo Seinen 148, no. 2 (May 2002): 74–77. In Japanese. Not seen.
  787. Noriyuki Harada, “Facts, Methods, and Literary Creativity in Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage,” Poetica: An International Journal of Linguistic-Literary Studies 68 (2007): 75–98.
    On the theory and practice of Johnsonian biography, set in the context of the history of biographical writing. “Life of Savage leaves a memorable trace in the history of biography as well as in the progress of Johnson's own literary achievement.” Describes Johnson's techniques of research and his fondness for dichotomies. In a special issue on “Tradition and Transition: Literature and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Britain.”
  788. William Hardie, “Portraits of Dr Johnson in Their Georgian Context,” Poetica: An International Journal of Linguistic-Literary Studies 68 (2007): 99–116.
    On portraits of Johnson by Reynolds and Opie, with a discussion of contemporary portraits by other major artists. In a special issue on “Tradition and Transition: Literature and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Britain.” Includes small black-and-white images.
  789. John Hardy, “Samuel Johnson's Literary Criticism,” Essays and Studies 39 (1986): 62–77.
  790. John Hardy, “Samuel Johnson,” in Dryden to Johnson, ed. Roger Lonsdale (New York: Bedrick, 1987), pp. 279–311.
  791. John Hardy, “Line 361 of The Vanity of Human Wishes,” N&Q 39, no. 4 (Dec. 1992): 480–81.
  792. John Hardy, “Johnson and the Truth, Revisited: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 2002,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 7 (2005): 9–20. Not seen.
  793. David Harley, “Johnson and Neo-Hippocratic Medicine,” The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 32–39.
  794. Thomas Harmsworth, 3rd Baron of Harmsworth, “Tired of London? Then Read On,” History Today 53, no. 3 (March 2003): 62–63.
  795. Richard L. Harp, ed. Dr. Johnson's Critical Vocabulary: A Selection from His “Dictionary” (Lanham, MD: Univ. Press of America, 1986). Pp. xlv + 268. “The purpose of this book . . . is to put into general circulation those portions of the Dictionary that persons interested in literature and writing would find of greatest value.” Reviews:
  796. Richard Harries, “Sermon Preached in Lichfield Cathedral Sunday, 24th September, 1989,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989): 16–18.
  797. Richard Harries, “Johnson and Unbelief,” The New Rambler E:3 (1999–2000): 11–21.
  798. Jocelyn Harris, “Samuel Johnson, Samuel Richardson, and the Dial-Plate,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 9, no. 2 (Autumn 1986): 157–63.
  799. Jeffrey Peter Hart, “Does the University Have a Future?” National Review 40 (1 April 1988): 32. Imagined conversation between Samuel Johnson and William James.
  800. Jeffrey Hart, “Samuel Johnson as Hero,” Modern Age, 42, no. 2 (Spring 2000): 185–91.
  801. Kevin Hart, “Economic Acts: Johnson in Scotland,” Eighteenth-Century Life 16, no. 1 (Feb. 1992): 94–110.
  802. Kevin Hart, “Johnson as Monument,” The Critical Review 34 (1994): 33–49.
  803. Kevin Hart, Samuel Johnson and the Culture of Property (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999). Pp. 244. Reviews:
  804. Kevin Hart, How to Read a Page of Boswell: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 1999 (Melbourne: Johnson Society of Australia; Sydney: Vagabond Press, 2000).
  805. Philip Harvey, “The Effect of Judgement: Samuel Johnson and His Lives of the Poets,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 4 (2000): 5–10.
  806. Phillip Harvey, “‘Good Living’: The Poetry of Samuel Johnson, The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 9 (Aug. 2007): 47–61.
    Not seen.
  807. Franz Josef Hausmann, “Samuel Johnson (1709–1784): Bicentenaire de sa mort,” Lexicographica 1 (1985): 239–42. In French.
  808. Emma Hawari, “Samuel Johnson and Lessing's Lexicographical Work,” New German Studies 13, no. 3 (Autumn 1985): 185–95.
  809. E. E. E. Hawari, “Johnson and Lessing: A Study of Johnson's Critical Theory and Practice,” Index to Theses 43, no. 2 (1994): 442.
  810. Emma Hawari, Johnson's and Lessing's Dramatic Critical Theories and Practice with a Consideration of Lessing's Affinities with Johnson (Bern: P. Lang, 1991). Pp. 293. Reviews:
  811. Clement Hawes, “Johnson and Imperialism,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 114–26.
  812. Clement Hawes, “Johnson's Cosmopolitan Nationalism,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 37–63.
  813. Clement Hawes, “Periodizing Johnson: Anticolonial Modernity as Crux and Critique,” in After the Imperial Turn: Thinking with and through the Nation, ed. Antoinette Burton (Durham: Duke Univ. Press, 2003), pp. 217–29.
  814. Clement Hawes, The British Eighteenth Century and Global Critique (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005): chapter 7 (“Johnson's Immanent Critique of Imperial Nationalism”), pp. 169–200.
  815. Clement Hawes, “Samuel Johnson's Politics of Contingency,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 73–94.
    Not seen???
  816. Sir John Hawkins, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., ed. O M Brack, Jr. (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 2009). Pp. xxiv + 554.
    The first scholarly edition of Hawkins's Life, first published in 1787. Brack's annotations are extensive.
    Reviews:
  817. William Anthony Hay, “Reason, Truth, and Community in Samuel Johnson's Later Work,” Consortium on Revolutionary Europe: Selected Papers 4 (1997), pp. 53–60. Not seen.
  818. Isamu Hayakawa, Jisho hensan no dainamizumu: Jonson, Uebusuta to nihon (“The Dynamism of Lexicography: Johnson, Webster and Japan”) (Tokyo: Jiyusha, 2001). Pp. xviii + 532. In Japanese. Not seen.
  819. Ernest Heberden, “Dr. Heberden and Dr. Johnson,” The New Rambler D:3 (1987–88), 9–21.
  820. Elizabeth Hedrick, “Locke's Theory of Language and Johnson's Dictionary,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 20, no. 4 (Summer 1987): 422–44.
  821. Elizabeth Hedrick, “Fixing the Language: Johnson, Chesterfield, and The Plan of a Dictionary,” ELH, 55, no. 2 (Summer 1988): 421–42.
  822. Elizbeth Hedrick, “The Duties of a Scholar: Samuel Johnson in Piozzi's ,” in Mentoring in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, ed. Anthony W. Lee (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010), pp. 211–24.
  823. Donna Heiland, “Remembering the Hero in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 194–206.
  824. Eithne Henson, “The Fictions of Romantick Chivalry”: Samuel Johnson and Romance (Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Press, 1992). Pp. 255. Reviews:
  825. Eithne Henson, “Johnson and the Condition of Women,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 67–84.
  826. Eithne Henson, “Lost for Words,” The Independent, 27 June 1999, p. 31. Brief letter to the Editor, challenging A. N. Wilson's claim that Johnson dismissed monastic retirement.
  827. Neil Hertz, “Dr. Johnson's Forgetfulness, Descartes' Piece of Wax,” Eighteenth-Century Life 16, no. 3 (Nov. 1992): 167–81.
  828. Nikki Hessell, Literary Authors, Parliamentary Reporters: Johnson, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Dickens (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012).
  829. Regina Hewitt, “Time in Rasselas: Johnson's Use of Locke's Concept,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, 19 (1989): 267–76.
  830. Alison Hickey, “‘Extensive Views’ in Johnson's Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” SEL 32, no. 3 (Summer 1992): 537–53.
  831. Bronwen Hickman, “The Women in Johnson's World,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2 (1997): 7–15.
  832. Nelson Hilton, Lexis Complexes (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1995), chapter 3 (“Restless Wrestling: Johnson's Rasselas”), pp. 38–55.
  833. Elizabeth Jane Wall Hinds, “Sari, Sorry, and the Vortex of History: Calendar Reform, Anachronism, and Language Change in Mason & Dixon,” American Literary History, 12, nos. 1–2 (Spring–Summer 2000): 187–215.
  834. Charles H. Hinnant, Samuel Johnson: An Analysis (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988). Pp. ix + 148. Reviews:
  835. Charles H. Hinnant, ed., Johnson and Gender: Special Issue of South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992). Reviews:
  836. Charles H. Hinnant, “Johnson and the Limits of Biography: Teaching the Life of Savage,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 107–13.
  837. Charles H. Hinnant, “Steel for the Mind”: Samuel Johnson and Critical Discourse (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1994). Pp. xi + 251. Reviews:
  838. Charles H. Hinnant, “‘An Uniform and Tractable Vice’: Samuel Johnson and the Transformation of the Passions into Interests,” 1650–1850 8 (2003): 61–75.
  839. Christopher Hirst and Genevieve Roberts, “The A–Z of Johnson's Dictionary: Samuel Johnson Defined Both Language and Life in 18th-Century,” The Independent, 31 March 2005.
  840. Christopher Hitchens, “Samuel Johnson: Demons and Dictionaries,” in Arguably: Essays (New York: Twelve, 2011), pp. ???.
  841. Henry Hitchings, “Samuel Johnson and Sir Thomas Browne,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of London, 2003. Not seen.
  842. Henry Hitchings, Dr Johnson's Dictionary: The Extraordinary Story of the Book that Defined the World (London: J. Murray, 2005). Published in the United States as Defining the World: The Extraordinary Story of Dr Johnson's Dictionary (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005). Pp. 278.
    A popular overview of the composition of the Dictionary, contextualized in SJ's life and the history of lexicography.
    Reviews:
  843. Henry Hitchings, “Alphabet Coup: Samuel Johnson Was Motivated by What He Called ‘the Exuberance of Signification’ in His Mission to Compile the First Comprehensive English Dictionary,” Financial Times Weekend Magazine, 2 April 2005, p. 26.
  844. Henry Hitchings, “Words Count: Samuel Johnson's Dictionary Was Published 250 Years Ago This Month: Henry Hitchings Reveals Johnson's Technique: An A-Z of English (without the X),” The Guardian, 2 April 2005, p. 5.
    A brief notice of the 250th anniversary.
  845. Henry Hitchings, “Dr Johnson, the Man of Many Words,” BBC History April 2005, pp. 44–45.
  846. Hentry Hitchings, “Samuel Johnson and Sir Thomas Browne,” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 46–56.
  847. R. W. Holder, “Samuel Johnson, 1709–1784: A Dictionary of the English Language,” chapter ??? (???) of The Dictionary Men: Their Lives and Times (Claverton Down, Bath: Bath Univ. Press, 2004). Not seen.
  848. Peter Holland, “Playing Johnson's Shakespeare,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 1–23.
    “Performance is a recurrent issue in Johnson's approach to Shakespeare. . . . Performance can also be for Johnson the testing-ground for emendation.”
  849. Richard Holmes, Dr. Johnson and Mr. Savage (New York: Pantheon Books, 1993). Pp. xii + 260.
    A popular joint biography of Johnson and Savage, focusing on SJ's early years in London.
    Reviews:
  850. Richard Holmes, “Dr Johnson's First Cat,” in Sidetracks: Explorations of a Romantic Biographer (London: HarperCollins, 2000), pp. 405–10.
  851. Anthea Hopkins, “The Dangerous Distinction of Authorship,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 21–24.
  852. A. D. Horgan, Johnson on Language: An Introduction (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994). Pp. ix + 226. Reviews:
  853. Thomas A. Horrocks and Howard Weinbrot, eds., Johnson after Three Centuries, special number of Harvard Library Bulletin 20, nos. 3–4. Pp. v + 133.
  854. Gloria Horsley-Meacham, “The Johnsonian Jest in ‘Benito Cereno,’” American Notes & Queries 6, no. 1 (Jan. 1993): 17–18.
  855. Thomas Hothem, “Johnson in the Composition Classroom,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 1 (March 2005): 12–15.
  856. Con Houlihan, “I'll Never Tire of Johnson: Great Man Led Band of Artists ... with an Irish Genius at the Fore,” The Herald (Ireland), 11 July 2012.
    A short, impressionistic introduction to Johnson, Garrick, and Goldsmith.
  857. Christopher Howse, “A Tortuous Tale of Drugs, Infatuation and Madness: After 300 Years, Samuel Johnson's Story Remains Unmatched as a Life Lived to the Full,” The Daily Telegraph, 12 Sept. 2009.
    “Samuel Johnson's books are unread but his life remains gripping. It's a tale of sexual frustration, low life, spasmodic tics, drug addiction, fear of madness, disappointment in love, black depression and celebrity.”
  858. Philip Howard, “Dr. Johnson: The Perfect Professional Fleet Street Hack,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 18–21.
  859. Philip Howard, “Don't Take the Low Road,” The Times, 23 Oct. 1993, Vision, p. 4. Review of BBC2's Tour of the Western Isles with Coltrane and Sessions.
  860. Philip Howard, “In the Great Linguistic Debate, Both Sides Claim Dr. Johnson, and Rightly So,” The Times, 9 Feb. 1996, Features.
  861. Sarah Howe, “General and Invariable Ideas of Nature: Joshua Reynolds and His Critical Descendants,” English 54, no. 208 (2005): 1–13.
  862. Ben Hoyle, “Dr Johnson Revival Shows that Old Jokes Really Are Best,” The Times (London), 7 Aug. 2007.
    A review of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival premiere of Johnson and Boswell — Late but Live.
  863. N. J. Hudson, “Studies in the Moral and Religious Thought of Johnson,” D.Phil. Dissertation, University of Oxford, 1984. Not seen.
  864. N. J. Hudson, “Samuel Johnson and the Literature of Common Life,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 11, no. 1 (Spring 1988): 39–50.
  865. Nicholas Hudson, Samuel Johnson and Eighteenth-Century Thought (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988). Pp. x + 272. Reviews:
  866. Nicholas Hudson, “Three Steps to Perfection: Rasselas and the Philosophy of Richard Hooker,” Eighteenth-Century Life 14, no. 3 (Nov. 1990): 29–39.
  867. Nicholas Hudson, “‘Open’ and ‘Enclosed’ Readings of Rasselas,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 31, no. 1 (Spring 1990): 47–67.
  868. Nicholas Hudson, “The Nature of Johnson's Conservatism,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 925–43.
  869. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson's Dictionary and the Politics of ‘Standard English,’” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 77–93. Reprinted in Ashgate Critical Essays on Early English Lexicographers, Volume 5: The Eighteenth Century, ed. Anne McDermott (Farnham: Ashgate, 2012), pp. 159–75.
  870. Nicholas Hudson, “Discourse of Transition: Johnson, the 1750s, and the Rise of the Middle Class,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 13 (2002): 31–51.
  871. Nicholas Hudson, “Samuel Johnson, Urban Culture, and the Geography of Postfire London,” Studies in English Literature 1500–1900 41, no. 3 (Summer 2002): 577–600.
  872. Nicholas Hudson, Samuel Johnson and the Making of Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2003). Pp. ix + 290.
    Hudson seeks “to reposition Johnson within the specific and transforming historical events of his lifetime, accepting all that might make him morally uncomfortable to us as well as admirable.” He rethinks many of the commonplaces on SJ's thoughts on politics, gender, empire, and nationalism.
    Reviews:
  873. Nicholas Hudson, “Reassessing the Political Context of the Dictionary: Johnson and the ‘Broad-bottom’ Opposition,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 61–76.
  874. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson and Empire,” TLS 5377 (21 April 2006): 17. Letter responding to Folkenflik's TLS review of Samuel Johnson and the Making of Modern England.
  875. Nicholas Hudson, “Shakespeare's Ghost: Johnson, Shakespeare, Garrick, and Construcing the English Middle-Class,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 47–69.
    “The rise of Shakespeare coincided with the creation of a new social order, . . . what is sometimes, misleadingly, called ‘the rise of the middle class.’” Hudson considers the relationship between Shakespeare and class identity, focusing on Garrick's performance style.
  876. Nicholas Hudson, A Political Biography of Samuel Johnson (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2013). Pp. 256.
  877. Nicholas Hudson, “Two Bits of Drudgery: A Homage to Johnson, the Lexicographer,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers, 2 (1997): 11–15.
  878. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson and Political Correctness,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2, no. 2 (1998): 1–7.
  879. Nicholas Hudson, Johnson and the Macquarie: An Investigation of 250 Years' Progress in Language and Lexicography (Melbourne: privately printed for the Johnson Society of Australia, 1999). The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture for 1998.
  880. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson and Physick,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 3 (1999): 1–13.
  881. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson and Natural Philosophy,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 4 (2000): 11–16.
  882. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson and the Animal World,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 5 (2001): 1–12.
  883. Nicholas Hudson, “Johnson in America,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 6 (2002): 14–19.
  884. Nicholas Hudson, “Mr Johnson Changes Trains,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 7 (2005): 65–79. Not seen.
  885. Gay W. Hughes, “The Estrangement of Hester Thrale and Samuel Johnson: A Revisionist View,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 145–91.
  886. Patrick D. Hundley, “Dr. Johnson's Theory of Autobiography,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 11–16.
  887. Mary Jane Hurst, “Samuel Johnson's Dying Words,” ELN 23, no. 2 (Dec. 1985): 45–53.
  888. W. B. Hutchings, “Johnson and Juvenal,” New Rambler, D:3 (1987–88), 21–22.
  889. W. B. Hutchings, “Johnson's Life of Pope: Morality and Judgment,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 3–14.
  890. Bill Hutchings and Bill Ruddick, “Johnson's London and The Vanity of Human Wishes: Classical and Eighteenth-Century Contexts,” Proceedings of the English Association of the North 2 (1986): 63–77.
  891. William Hutchings and William Ruddick, “Samuel Johnson and Landscape,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 67–81.
  892. Roger Hutchison, All the Sweets of Being: A Life of James Boswell (London: Mainstream Publishing, 1996). Pp. 238. Reviews:
  893. Mary Hyde, “Adam, Tinker, and Newton, 1909–48,” Modern Philology 85 (May 1988): 558–68.
  894. Giovanni Iamartino, “Dyer's and Burke's Addenda and Corrigenda to Johnson's Dictionary and Clues to Its Contemporary Reception,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 8, no. 2 (July–Dec. 1995): 199–248.
  895. Giovanni Iamartino, “English Flour and Italian Bran: Johnson's Dictionary and the Reformation of Italian Lexicography in the Early Nineteenth Century,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 203–16. Not seen.
  896. Giovanni Iamartino, “What Johnson Means to Me,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 1 (March 2007): 18–21.
    On the author's fascination with Johnson's Dictionary and Barretti's English–Italian dictionary.
  897. Giovanni Iamartino and Robert DeMaria, Jr., eds., “Samuel Johnson's Dictionary and the Eighteenth-Century World of Words,” special section in Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 5–261. Not seen. Reviews:
  898. John Ingledew, “Samuel Johnson's Jamaican Connections,” Caribbean Quarterly 30, no. 2 (1984): 1–17.
  899. Richard Ingrams, “‘Old Dread Devil,’” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989): 8–15.
  900. Danielle Insalaco, “Thinking of Italy, Making History: Johnson and Historiography,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 99–113.
  901. Dale Katherine Ireland, “Samuel Johnson's Uses of Peru: A Humanist-Nationalism,” M.A. thesis, California State University — Hayward, 2005. Pp. vii + 80.
  902. Iona Italia, “Johnson as Moralist in The Rambler,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 51–76.
    “In The Rambler, Johnson attempts to use the literary essay-periodical, which — unlike the essay tout court — was traditionally the vehicle of wit, primarily as a means of moral instruction. . . . The most important features of Johnson's publication all shed light on Johnson's moralism: The Rambler's uniformity of tone; its adoption of a persona who is a representative figure, rather than an eccentric individual; its focus on the universals of human behavior rather than current affairs or the fashions and follies beloved of Richard Steele; together with its didactic tone.”
  903. Iona Italia, “‘Writing like a Teacher’: Johnson as Moralist in the Rambler,” chapter 7 (pp. 140–64) of The Rise Of Literary Journalism In The Eighteenth Century: Anxious Employment (London: Routledge, 2005).
    Adapted from the article above.
  904. Yutaka Izumitani, Johnson: His Life as a Born Fighter (Hiroshima: Keisui, 1992). In Japanese. Not seen.
  905. Yutaka Izumitani, A Study of “Rasselas” in Japan (Hiroshima: Keisui, 2001). In Japanese. Not seen.
  906. Ian Jack, “Johnson and Autobiography,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 28–29.
  907. Malcolm Jack, “Mandeville, Johnson, Morality and Bees,” in Mandeville and Augustan Ideas: New Essays, ed. Charles W. A. Prior (Victoria, B.C.: Univ. of Victoria, 2000), pp. 85–96.
  908. Crispin Jackson, “Samuel Johnson,” Book and Magazine Collector 117 (1993): 44–56. Not seen.
  909. H. J. Jackson, “Johnson's Milton and Coleridge's Wordsworth,” Studies in Romanticism 28 (Spring 1989): 29–47.
  910. H. J. Jackson, “The Immoderation of Samuel Johnson,” University of Toronto Quarterly 59, no. 3 (Spring 1990): 382–98.
  911. H. J. Jackson, “An Important Annotated Boswell,” Review of English Studies 49, no. 193 (Feb. 1998): 9–22. Fulke Greville's notes in a BL copy.
  912. H. J. Jackson, Marginalia: Readers Writing in Books (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2001), chapter 4 (“Object Lessons”), pp. 101–48, on Hester Thrale Piozzi's annotated Rasselas and Fulke Greville's annotated Life of Johnson; chapter 5 (“Two Profiles”), pp. 149–78, on annotations in Boswell's Life.
  913. H. J. Jackson, “A General Theory of Fame in the Lives of the Poets,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 19 (2009): 9–20.
    A consideration of literary fame and immortality. “Johnson's concept of fame owes a great deal to classical tradition and a little to modern developments. Though for the most part he accepted and articulated the received wisdom of his time, at two or three points he took issue with it in interesting ways.”
  914. Kevin Jackson, “Taking Liberties on the Low Road: John Byrne Directs Fellow Scots John Sessions and Robbie Coltrane in ‘Boswell and Johnson's Tour of the Western Isles,’ His ‘Screenplay’ for BBC2,” The Independent, 26 Oct. 1993, p. 24.
  915. Jasbir Jain, “The Imperial Concept: Johnson and Burke,” Indian Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 1, no. 1 (Summer 1986): 17–28. Not seen.
  916. Nalini Jain, “Johnson as a Critic of Poetic Language,” D.Phil. Dissertation, University of Oxford, 1983. Not seen.
  917. Nalini Jain, “Echoes of Milton in Johnson's Irene,” American Notes & Queries 24, nos. 9–10 (May–June 1986): 134–36.
  918. Nalini Jain, “Ideas of the Origin of Language in the Eighteenth Century: Johnson versus the Philosophers,” in Aberdeen and the Enlightenment, ed. Jennifer J. Carter and Joan H. Pittock (Aberdeen: Aberdeen Univ. Press, 1987), pp. 291–97.
  919. Nalini Jain, “Johnson's Irene: The First Draft,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 13, no. 2 (Autumn 1990): 163–67.
  920. Nalini Jain, The Mind's Extensive View: Samuel Johnson on Poetic Language (Strathtay, Perthshire: Clunie Press, 1991). Pp. xii + 183. Reviews:
  921. Nalini Jain, ed., Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991). Pp. 126. Reviews:
  922. Nalini Jain, “Johnson's Shakespeare: A Moral and Religious Quest,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 82–101.
  923. Nalini Jain, “Samuel Johnson's ‘China to Peru’ and Joseph Glanvill,” American Notes & Queries 6, no. 4 (Oct. 1993): 207–8.
  924. Nalini Jain, “The Vanity of Human Wishes,” N&Q 41, no. 2 (June 1994): 198–99.
  925. Nalini Jain, “Samuel Johnson's ‘China to Peru,’” N&Q 45, no. 4 (Dec. 1998): 455.
  926. Heidi L. Janz, “Samuel Johnson: Written Writer, Unwritten Crip,” chapter 3 of “Crip Writers/Written Crips: Constructions of Illness and Disability in Selected Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Poetry and Fiction,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Alberta, 2003, pp. 51–82.
  927. Derek Jarrett, “Guilt-Edged Insecurity,” New York Review of Books 37 (26 April 1990): 11–13.
  928. Derek Jarrett, “The Doctor's Prescription,” New York Review of Books 46, no. 5 (18 March 1999): 39–42. Review essay on Lipking, Samuel Johnson: The Life of an Author and Bate, Samuel Johnson.
  929. Simon Jarvis, Scholars and Gentlemen: Shakespearian Textual Criticism and Representations of Scholarly Labour, 1725–1765 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), chapter 6 (“Johnson's Authorities: The Professional Scholar and English Texts in Lexicography and Textual Criticism”), pp. 129–58; chapter 7 (“Johnson's Theory and Practice of Shakespearian Textual Criticism”), pp. 159–81.
  930. D. W. Jefferson, Three Essays: Johnson, Wordsworth, Byron (Leeds: Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, 1998). Pp. 48.
  931. Paul Jeffreys-Powell, “A Grammatical Error in Johnson's Ode on the Isle of Skye ('Ponti Profundis Clausa Recessibus'),” N&Q 35, no. 2 (June 1988): 190–91.
  932. Thomas Jemielity, “Samuel Johnson, The Vanity of Human Wishes and Biographical Criticism,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 15 (1986): 227–39.
  933. Thomas Jemielity, “Samuel Johnson and the Ossianic Controversy,” Selected Papers on Medievalism 2 (1986–1987): 43–51. Not seen.
  934. Thomas Jemielity, “Thomas Pennant's Scottish Tours and A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 312–27.
  935. Thomas Jemielity, “‘A Keener Eye on Vacancy’: Boswell's Second Thoughts about Second Sight,” Prose Studies 11, no. 1 (May 1988): 24–40.
  936. Thomas Jemielity, “Prophetic Voices and Satiric Echoes,” Cithara 29, no. 1 (1989): 30–47.
  937. Thomas Jemielity, “‘More Disagreeable for Him to Teach, or the Boys to Learn’? The Vanity of Human Wishes in the Classroom,” in Teaching Eighteenth-Century Poetry, ed. Christopher Fox (New York: AMS, 1990), pp. 291–302.
  938. Thomas Jemielity, “Teaching A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 99–106.
  939. Elizabeth Jenkins, “Dr. Johnson and David Garrick: A Friendship,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 20–21.
  940. Richard Jenkyns, “Peculiar Words,” Prospect, 21 April 2005.
  941. Samuel Joeckel, “Lewis and Samuel Johnson's Rasselas: Hearing the Call of the Sehnsucht,” CSL: The Bulletin of the New York C. S. Lewis Society 27, no. 4 (1996): 1–6.
  942. Samuel Joeckel, “Narratives of Hope, Fictions of Happiness: Samuel Johnson and Enlightenment Experience,” Christianity and Literature 53, no. 1 (Autum 2003): 19–38.
  943. Vijaya John, “Johnson's Dictionary: Some Reflections,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 1–4.
  944. Christopher D. Johnson, “A Rhetoric of Truth and Instruction: Hawkins's The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., and Eighteenth-Century Biographical Practice,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 59–73.
  945. Holly Catherine Johnson, “William Law, Samuel Johnson, and the Readers They Created,” M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland at College Park, 1989. Not seen.
  946. Nancy Newberry Johnson, “Theories of the Earth in A Dictionary of the English Language (1755): Samuel Johnson's Engagement with Early Science,” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 5 (Nov. 2001): 1844A. University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
  947. Samuel Johnson, Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland, ed. J. D. Fleeman (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1985). Reviews:
  948. Samuel Johnson, A Voyage to Abyssinia, ed. Joel J. Gold (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1985). The Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 15. Reviews:
  949. Samuel Johnson, Johnson's Preface to Shakespeare: A Facsimile of the 1778 Edition, ed. P. J. Smallwood (Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1985).
  950. Samuel Johnson, Two Letters from Samuel Johnson to Sir Robert Chambers, September 14, 1773 and October 4, 1783 ed. Loren R. Rothschild (Pacific Palisades: Rasselas Press, 1986).
  951. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Sixteen Latin Poems (Florence, Ky.: Robert L. Barth, 1987).
  952. Samuel Johnson, Daily Readings from the Prayers of Samuel Johnson, ed. Elton Trueblood (Springfield, Ill.: Templegate Publishers, 1987).
  953. Samuel Johnson, Vorwort zum Werk Shakespeares ed. and tr. Herbert Mainusch (Stuttgart: Reclam, 1987). In German.
  954. Samuel Johnson, The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia, ed. J. P. Hardy (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1988).
  955. Samuel Johnson, The Life of Mr. Richard Savage (1727), intro. by Timothy Erwin (Los Angeles: William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, 1988). Augustan Reprint Society, no. 247.
  956. Samuel Johnson, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (Charlotte Hall, MD: Recorded Books, Inc., 1988). Sound recording on 3 cassettes, read by Patrick Tull and Alexander Spenser. Reviews:
  957. Samuel Johnson, Rasselas and Other Tales, ed. Gwin J. Kolb (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1990). The Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 16. Reviews:
  958. Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, 2 vols. (London: Longman, 1990). Reviews:
  959. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson's Taxation No Tyranny: A Fragment of Proof Copy Corrected by the Author and Preserved by James Boswell to Commemorate Dr. Johnson's 281st Birthday at the Grolier Club in New York (Privately printed, 1990).
  960. Samuel Johnson, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland; James Boswell, Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, ed. Peter Levi (London: Folio Society, 1990).
  961. Samuel Johnson, Five Latin Poems, ed. and tr. Thomas Kaminski (Privately printed for The Samuel Johnson Society of the Central Region, Loyola University, Chicago, April 1991).
  962. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, ed. Bruce Redford, 5 vols. (Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 1992–94). Reviews:
  963. Samuel Johnson, Know Thyself, ed. and tr. Fred Lock (Ontario: Privately printed by Margaret Lock, 1992). An illustrated keepsake edition of Gnothi Seauton in English hexameter. Eighty-five copies printed.
  964. Samuel Johnson, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland, ed. Peter Levi (London: Penguin, 1993).
  965. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson's Translation of Sallust: A Facsimile and Transcription of the Hyde Manuscript, ed. David L. Vander Meulen and G. Thomas Tanselle (New York: the Johnsonians; Charlottesville: The Bibliographical Society of the Univ. of Virginia, 1993). Reviews:
  966. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson's Private Interview with George III: The Strahan Minute (Tempe: Privately printed for the Friends of the Arizona State University Library, 1993). Facsimile.
  967. Samuel Johnson, Histoire de Rasselas prince d'Abyssine, tr. Alexandre Notré, rev. and ed. Alain Montandon (Clermont-Ferrand: Editions Adosa, 1993). New revised edition of the 1823 French translation.
  968. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson on the Character and Duty of an Academick (Tempe: Gene Valentine, 1994).
  969. Samuel Johnson, The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia and Cornelia Knight, Dinarbas, A Tale, ed. Lynne Meloccaro (London: Dent; Rutland: Tuttle, 1994).
  970. Samuel Johnson, Histoire de Rasselas prince d'Abyssinie, tr. Octavie Belot, annotated by Felix Paknadel and Annie Rivara (Paris: Desjonqueres, 1994).
  971. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, ed. Alexander Chalmers (London: Studio Editions, 1994).
  972. Samuel Johnson, Selected Latin Poems, ed. Robert L. Barth (Edgewood, Ky.: Robert L. Barth, 1995). Privately printed 19-page pamphlet.
  973. Samuel Johnson, The Latin and Greek Poems of Samuel Johnson: Text, Translation, and Commentary, ed. Barry Baldwin (London: Duckworth, 1995). Reviews:
  974. Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, ed. Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1996). CD-ROM for Windows or Macintosh. Reviews:
  975. Samuel Johnson, Journey to the Hebrides, ed. Ian McGowan (Edinburgh: Canongate, 1996).
  976. Samuel Johnson, On the Character and Duty of an Academick, ed. Robert DeMaria, Jr. (New York: privately printed for the Johnsonians, 2000). Pp. 14.
  977. Samuel Johnson, The Major Works, ed. Donald J. Greene (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2000). Pp. xxxii + 840. A reissue of Greene's Major Authors edition of 1984.
  978. Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language Jukyuseiki eigo jiten fukkoku shusei, ed. Henry John Todd and Daisuke Nagashima, 4 vols. (Tokyo: Yumanishobo, 2001). Not seen.
  979. Samuel Johnson, A New Preface by Samuel Johnson: Some Remarks on the Progress of Learning Since the Reformation, Especially with Regard to the Hebrew: Occasion'd by the Perusal of the Rev. Mr. Romaine's Proposal for Reprinting the Dictionary and Concordance of F. Marius de Calasio: With Large Additions and Emendations: In an Address to the Publick by a Stranger to the Editor and a Friend to Learning, ed. O M Brack and Robert DeMaria (Tempe, Ariz.: Almond Tree Press & Paper Mill, 2001). Pp. 18. Not seen.
  980. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson's Dictionary: Selections from the 1755 Work That Defined the English Language, ed. Jack Lynch (Delray Beach, Fla.: Levenger Press, 2002; New York: Walker & Co., 2003; London: Atlantic, 2004). Pp. vii + 646. Reviews:
  981. Samuel Johnson, Prefaci a les obres dramàtiques de William Shakespeare, traducció de John Stone i Enric Vidal, pròleg de John Stone, epíleg de Harold Bloom (Barcelona: Publicacions i Edicions, 2002). Pp. 119. Translation of the Preface to Shakespeare into Catalan.
  982. Samuel Johnson, Pensamientos acerca de las últimas negociaciones relativas a las Islas Malvinas, y otros escritos, trans. Pablo Massa and Federico Horacio Lafuente, ed. Cristina Leone (Buenos Aires: Proyecto Editorial, 2003). Not seen.
  983. Samuel Johnson, Kuai le wang zi: Leisilesi, trans. Ngai-lai Cheng (Beijing: Beijing da xue chu ban she, 2003). Pp. iii + iii + 139. Chinese translation of Rasselas. Not seen.
  984. Samuel Johnson, Selected Essays, ed. David Womersley (London: Penguin, 2003). Pp. xl + 594. Reviews:
  985. Samuel Johnson, Savage: Biografi över en mördare och poet i 1700-talets England, trans. Leif Jäger (Stockholm: CKM Media, 2004). Pp. 148. The Life of Savage in Swedish. Not seen.
  986. Samuel Johnson, The Supplicating Voice: Spiritual Writings of Samuel Johnson, ed. John F. Thornton and Susan B. Varenne, preface by Owen Chadwick (New York: Vintage, 2005). Pp. xlvi + 300.
  987. Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language DVD-ROM or 3 CD-ROM set, Octavo, 2005. Includes an introductory essay by Eric Korn. Reviews:
  988. Samuel Johnson, Johnson on the English Language ed. Gwin J. Kolb and Robert DeMaria, Jr. (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2005). The Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 18. Pp. xlviii + 506. Reviews:
  989. Samuel Johnson, A Commentary on Mr. Pope's Principles of Morality, or Essay on Man: A Translation from the French, ed. O M Brack, Jr. (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2004). The Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 17. Pp. lvi + 441. Reviews:
  990. Samuel Johnson, Rasselas hoàng tu' xu' Abyssinia, trans. Thanh Hoa Hoàng (Hà Noi: Nhà xuat ban Phu Nu, 2004). Pp. 231. Vietnamese translation of Rasselas. Not seen.
  991. Samuel Johnson, The Latin Poems, trans. and ed. Niall Rudd (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2005). Pp. 153. Reviews:
  992. Samuel Johnson, Dr Johnson's Dictionary: An Anthology, ed. David Crystal (London: Penguin Books, 2005). Pp. xlv + 650. Reviews:
  993. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson's Unpublished Revisions to the “Dictionary of the English Language”: A Facsimile Edition, ed. Allen Reddick (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005). Pp. 425. Reviews:
  994. Samuel Johnson, The Vision of Theodore, the Hermit of Teneriffe: Found in His Cell, with a preface by Roland A. Hoover, an introduction by Herman W. Liebert, and an afterword by Robert DeMaria, Jr. (New York: Typophiles, in collaboration with The Johnsonians, 2007). Pp. viii + 25.
    A fine-press edition of The Vision of Theodore, “Conceived as a memento in connection with the Age of Johnson Prize awarded by the Fellows of St. Peter’s College, Oxford.”
  995. Samuel Johnson, The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on Their Works, ed. Roger Lonsdale, 4 vols. (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2006). Pp. 2,200. Reviews:
  996. Samuel Johnson, Johnson on Savage: The Life of Mr Richard Savage by Samuel Johnson, ed. Richard Holmes (London: HarperCollins, 2005). Pp. 135. Reviews:
  997. Samuel Johnson, The Vision of Theodore, Hermit of Teneriffe, Found in His Cell, with a preface by Roland A. Hoover, an introduction by Herman W. Liebert, an afterword by Robert DeMaria, Jr., and a dedication by Typophiles president Theo Rehak (New York: The Typophiles in collaboration with the Johnsonians, 2005). Pp. vi + 25 + [2]. A fine press edition.
  998. Samuel Johnson, The History of Rasselas: Prince of Abyssinia, ed. Paul Goring (London and New York: Penguin, 2007). Pp. xlvi + 139.
    A new edition in the Penguin Classics series. Not seen.
  999. Samuel Johnson, Viaje a las Islas Occidentales de Escocia, ed. and trans. Agustín Coletes Blanco (Ovideo: KRK Ediciones, 2006). Pp. 515. In Spanish.
    An attractive pocket-sized Spanish translation of A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland, with a long original introduction in four parts: “El doctor Samuel Johnson (1709–1784): vida, obra y entorno literario”; “La Escocia que conoció Johnson y sus claves históricas: de Caledonia a Culloden”; “El Viaje a las Islas Occidentales de Escocia como libro de viajes: Género, estructuración y contenido”; and “Bibliografía comentada: fuentes primarias y secundarias: Esta edición y traducción.”
    Reviews:
  1000. Samuel Johnson, The Plan of a Dictionary of the English Language, ed. Jack Lynch, in Practical Lexicography: A Reader, ed. Thierry Fontenelle (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2008), pp. 19–30.
  1001. Samuel Johnson, The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia, ed. Jessica Richard (Peterborough, Ont.: Broadview Press, 2008). Pp. 215.
    A Broadview Edition, containing the full text of Rasselas along with selections from Johnson's other writings (Lobo's Voyage, Vanity, and Ramblers 4, 204, and 205), contemporary responses, and other examples of eighteenth-century Orientalism.
  1002. Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson: Selected Writings, ed. Peter Martin (Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard Univ. Press, 2009). Pp. 503.
    A collection of Johnson's writings, especially selections from the periodical essays and the Lives.
    Reviews:
  1003. Samuel Johnson and James Boswell, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland, with the Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, ed. Allan Massie (New York: Knopf, 2002). Pp. xxxix + 454.
  1004. Samuel Johnson and James Boswell, To the Hebrides: Samuel Johnson's “Journey to the Western Islands” and James Boswell's “Journal of a Tour,” ed. Ronald Black (Edinburgh: Birlinn Publishers, 2007). Pp. 576. Not seen.
    The texts of Johnson's Journey and Boswell's Journal, with Rowlandson's illustrations.
  1005. Samuel Johnson, Donald MacNicol, James Boswell, and Ronald Black, Journey to the Western Isles (Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2004). Pp. 600. Not seen.
  1006. Steve Johnson, “Pass the Bons Mots: U. of C. Becomes the Nerve Center of 200-Year-Old Wit that Never Ages,” Chicago Tribune, 20 Feb. 1991, p. C1.
  1007. Melker Johnsson, “Samuel Johnson Agonist,” Fenix 5, nos. 1–2 (1987): 80–120.
  1008. Freya Johnston, “Diminutive Observations in Johnson's Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 1–16.
    On Johnson's interest in the “little.” Later developed into a chapter of Samuel Johnson and the Art of Sinking.
  1009. Freya Johnston, “Samuel Johnson and Robert Levet,” Modern Language Review 97, no. 1 (Jan. 2002): 26–35.
  1010. Freya Johnston, Samuel Johnson and the Art of Sinking, 1709–1791 (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2005). Pp. xv + 265.
    A learned meditation on Johnson's interest in “littleness.”
    Reviews:
  1011. Freya Johnston, “Accumulation in Johnson's Dictionary,” Essays in Criticism: A Quarterly Journal of Criticism 57, no. 4 (Oct. 2007): 301–24.
    Not seen.
  1012. Freya Johston and Lynda Mugglestone, eds., Samuel Johnson: The Arc of the Pendulum (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2012). Pp. xiii + 226.
  1013. Shirley White Johnston, “Samuel Johnson's Macbeth: ‘Fair Is Foul,’” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 189–230.
  1014. Brian Jones, “Dr Johnson in Paris,” Quadrant 32, nos. 1–2 (Jan.–Feb. 1988): 98–100.
  1015. I. E. Jones, “Johnson's Doctorate,” TLS, 21–27 Sept. 1990, p. 1001. Reply to Greene.
  1016. William R. Jones, “The Channel and English Writers: Johnson, Smollett, Fielding, and Falconer,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 292 (1991): 55–66.
  1017. Bob (R. R.) Jordan, “The Origins and Development of English Dictionaries 1: Early Days: Nathaniel Bailey and Samuel Johnson,” Modern English Teacher 10, no. 3 (2001): 15–19.
  1018. Sarah Elizabeth Jordan, “The Anxieties of Idleness: Idleness in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture,” Dissertation Abstracts International 55, no. 5 (1994): 1266A. Brandeis University. Not seen.
  1019. Sarah Jordan, “Samuel Johnson and Idleness,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (200), 145–76.
  1020. Sarah Jordan, The Anxieties of Idleness: Idleness in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2003), chapter 5 (“‘Driving on the System of Life’: Samuel Johnson and Idleness”), pp. 153–77.
  1021. Jacob Sider Jost, “Johnson on Torture: A Legal Footnote to the Life,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 44–47.
    On Johnson's comment that “Torture in Holland is considered as a favour to an accused person,” which Jost says is more than talking for victory.
  1022. Neill R. Joy, “A Samuel Johnson Allusion in a Letter to Benjamin Franklin Explained and Amplified,” American Notes & Queries 8, no. 1 (Winter 1995): 13–16.
  1023. Neill R. Joy, “Politics and Culture: The Dr. Franklin-Dr. Johnson Connection, with an Analogue,” Prospects 23 (1998): 59–105.
  1024. Sandro Jung, “‘In Quest of Mistaken Beauties’: Samuel Johnson's ‘Life of Collins’ Reconsidered,” Etudes anglaises 57, no. 3 (2004): 284–96.
  1025. Sandro Jung, “Johnson's Dictionary and the Language of William Collins's Odes on Several Descriptive and Allegoric Subjects,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 69–86. Not seen.
  1026. Sandro Jung, “Idleness Censured and Morality Vindicated: Johnson's Lives of Shenstone and Gray,” Etudes anglaises 60, no. 1 (Jan.–March 2007): 80–91.
    Not seen.
  1027. George Justice, “Imlac's Pedagogy,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 13 (2002): 1–29.
    A reading of Rasselas against the background of eighteenth-century ideas about education.
  1028. George Justice, The Manufacturers of Literature: Writing and the Literary Marketplace in Eighteenth-Century England, chapter 2 (“Pope's Epistle to Arbuthnot and Johnson's Life of Savage”) (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2002), pp. 71–111.
  1029. George Justice, “Teaching the Age of Johnson through the Life of Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 12–13.
  1030. George Justice, “Rasselas in ‘The Rise of the Novel,’” The Eighteenth-Century Novel 4 (2005): 217–31.
  1031. Henry Kahane and Renée Kahane, “Dr. Johnson's Dictionary: From Classical Learning to the National Language,” Lexicographia 41 (1992): 50–53.
  1032. J. Ellsworth Kalas, “Samuel Johnson: A Man of His Word,” chapter ??? (???) of Preaching about People: The Power of Biography St. Louis: Chalice Press, 2004). Not seen.
  1033. Thomas Kaminski, The Early Career of Samuel Johnson (New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1987). Pp. xi + 268.
    The most thorough biographical account of Johnson's early years in London.
    Reviews:
  1034. Thomas Kaminski, “Samuel Johnson, The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in A Companion to Literature from Milton to Blake, ed. David Womersley (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), pp. 331–38.
  1035. Thomas Kaminski, “Some Alien Qualities of Samuel Johnson's Art,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 222–238.
  1036. Thomas Kaminski, “From Bigotry to Genius: The Treatment of Johnson's Politics in Hawkins's The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 115–35.
  1037. Thomas Kaminski, “‘To Pluck a Titled Poet's Borrow'd Wing’: Richard Savage and Johnson's ‘Thales’ — Again,“ Notes and Queries 60, no. 258 (March 2013): 85–87.
  1038. Moonsoon Kang, “Satire as ‘A Sword in the Hands of a Mad Man’ and ‘That Art of Necessary Defence’: A Study of Madness and Satire in Swift and Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 61, no. 11 (May 2001): 4398A. Case Western Reserve Univ. Not seen.
  1039. Carey Kaplan and Ellen Cronan Rose, The Canon and the Common Reader (Knoxville: Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1990), chapter 2 (‘Dr. Johnson's Canon and His Common Reader”), pp. 15–34.
  1040. Michael Karounos, “Rasselas and the Riddle of the Caves: Setting Eternity in the Hearts of Men,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 39–58.
  1041. Mary Rose Kasraie, “Samuel Johnson's Dictionary (1755): Johnson's Use of Quotations from the Works of Alexander Pope in Volume 1 of the Dictionary,” M.A. Thesis, Georgia State University, 1990. Not seen.
  1042. Thomas George Kass, “Samuel Johnson's ‘Sermons’: Consolations for the Vacuity of Life,” Dissertation Abstracts International 50, no. 4 (Oct. 1989): 953A. Not seen.
  1043. T. G. Kass, “The Mixed Blessing of the Imagination in Johnson's Sermons,” Renascence 47, no. 2 (Winter 1995): 89–102.
  1044. Thomas G. Kass, “Holy Fear and Samuel Johnson's Sermons,” ELN 33, no. 2 (Dec. 1995): 36–48.
  1045. Thomas G. Kass, “Reading the ‘Religious’ Language of Samuel Johnson's Sermons,” Renascence 51, no. 4 (Summer 1999): 240–51.
  1046. Thomas Kass, “Morbid Melancholy, the Imagination, and Samuel Johnson's Sermons,” Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 8, no. 4 (2005): 47–63.
  1047. Linde Katritzky, Johnson and the Letters of Junius: New Perspectives on an Old Enigma (New York: Peter Lang, 1996). Reviews:
  1048. Linde Katritzky, “Junius: An Orthodox Rebel,” in Orthodoxy and Heresy in Eighteenth-Century Society: Essays from the DeBartolo Conference, ed. Regina Hewitt and Pat Rogers (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2002), pp. 134–53. Not seen.
  1049. Linde Katritzky, “Johnson and the Earl of Shelburne's Circle,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 101–18.
  1050. Colette Maria Kavanagh, “Samuel Johnson, Biographer,” M.A. Thesis, Georgetown University, 1994. Not seen.
  1051. P. J. Kavanagh, A Book of Consolations (London: HarperCollins, 1992). Pp. xviii + 238. Includes many selections from Johnson. Not seen.
  1052. P. J. Kavanagh, “Bywords (A Reflection on Samuel Johnson),” TLS, 15 Sept. 2000, p. 16.
  1053. John Keats, Wise and Otherwise: In Dialogue with Samuel Johnson and George Steevens (New Rochelle, N.Y.: James L. Weil, 1986). 50 copies.
  1054. Frederick M. Keener, The Chain of Becoming: The Philosophical Tale, the Novel, and Neglected Realism of the Enlightenment: Swift, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Johnson, and Austen (New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1983). Reviews:
  1055. Frederick M. Keener, “The Philosophical Tale, the Chain of Becoming, and the Novel,” Lessing and the Enlightenment, ed. Alexej Ugrinsky (New York: Greenwood, 1986), pp. 35–42.
  1056. Michael Keevak, “The Jew Psalmanazar,” chapter 4 of The Pretended Asian: George Psalmanazar's Eighteenth-Century Formosan Hoax (Detroit: Wayne State Univ. Press, 2004), pp. 99–117.
  1057. Michael Keevak, “Johnson's Psalmanazar,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 97–120.
  1058. S. P. T. Keilen, “Johnsonian Biography and the Swiftian Self,” The Cambridge Quarterly 23, no. 4 (1994): 324–47.
  1059. Lionel Kelly, “Beckett's Human Wishes,” in The Ideal Core of the Onion: Reading Beckett Archives, ed. John Pilling and Mary Bryden (Bristol: Beckett International Foundation, 1992), pp. 21–44.
  1060. Lionel Kelly, “Les Desirs humains de Beckett” (‘Beckett's Human Wishes,” tr. H. Fiamma), Europe: Revue litteraire mensuelle 71 (June–July 1993): 99–115.
  1061. Veronica Kelly, “Locke's Eyes, Swift's Spectacles,” in Body and Text in the Eighteenth Century, ed. Veronica Kelly and Dorothea von Mücke (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1994), pp. 66–85.
  1062. Kathleen Kemmerer, “Samuel Johnson's Androgyny and Sexual Politics,” Dissertation Abstracts International 54, no. 4 (Oct. 1993): 1376A. Fordham University. Not seen.
  1063. Kathleen Nulton Kemmerer, “A Neutral Being between the Sexes”: Samuel Johnson's Sexual Politics (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 1998). Reviews:
  1064. Kathleen Nulton Kemmerer, “Domestic Relations in Samuel Johnson's Life of Milton,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 57–82.
  1065. Maev Kennedy, “New Research Indicates Johnson Gave Up on His Dictionary: Leading Expert Claims that Dr Johnson Abandoned His Dictionary for Several Years — without Telling His Publishers,” The Guardian, 3 Aug. 2006. On Anne McDermott's research.
  1066. Richard Kennedy, “Cum Notis Variorum: Johnson's Shakespeare of 1765: A Comparison of the Two Editions of MND,” Shakespeare Newsletter 44, no. 4 (Winter 1994): 73.
  1067. Richard Kennedy, “Johnson's Shakespeare of 1765: A Comparison of the Two Editions of A Midsummer Night's Dream,” in Reading Readings: Essays on Shakespeare Editing in the Eighteenth Century, ed. Joanna Gondris (Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 323–29.
  1068. Mary Kenny, “Just What the Good Doctor Ordered,” The Sunday Telegraph, 5 June 1991. Selection of bons mots. Not seen.
  1069. Annette Maria Keogh, “British Translations: Foreign Languages and Translation in Johnson's Dictionary,” chapter 4 of “Found in Translation: Foreign Travel and Linguistic Difference in the Eighteenth Century,” Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford University, 2002, pp. 163–82.
  1070. Katherine Kerestman, “Breaking the Shackles of the Great Chain of Being and Liberating Compassion in the Eighteenth Century,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 3 (1997): 57–76.
  1071. Frank Kermode, “Heroic Milton: Happy Birthday,” New York Review of Books, 26 Feb. 2009, pp. 26–29.
    A review essay on Gordeon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns's John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought, Anna Beer's Milton: Poet, Pamphleteer, and Patriot, and Nigel Smith's Is Milton Better than Shakespeare? Kermode uses Johnson's Life of Milton to structure his own piece.
  1072. Alvin B. Kernan, “The Social Construction of Literature,” Kenyon Review 7, no. 4 (Fall 1985): 31–46.
  1073. Alvin B. Kernan, “Literacy Crises, Old and New Information Technologies and Cultural Change,” Language & Communication 9, nos. 2–3 (1989): 159–73.
  1074. Alvin B. Kernan, Printing Technology, Letters, and Samuel Johnson (Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 1987). Reviews:
  1075. Alvin B. Kernan, “King George of England Meets Samuel Johnson the Great Cham of Literature: The End of Courtly Letters and the Beginning of Modern Literature,” in Traditions and Innovations: Essays on British Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, ed. David G. Allen and Robert A. White (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1990), pp. 251–64.
  1076. Mel Kersey, “‘The Wells of English Undefiled’: Samuel Johnson's Romantic Resistance to Britishness,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 69–84.
  1077. John Kerslake, “Portraits of Johnson,” The New Rambler C:25 (1984): 32–34.
  1078. Tom Keymer, “‘Letters about Nothing’: Johnson and Epistolary Writing,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 224–39.
  1079. Thomas Keymer, “Johnson, Madness, and Smart,” in Christopher Smart and the Enlightenment, ed. Clement Hawes (New York: St. Martin's, 1999), pp. 177–94.
  1080. Thomas Keymer, “To Enjoy or Endure: Samuel Johnson's Message to America,” TLS, 27 March 2009, pp. 14–15.
    A version of Keymer's introduction to the Oxford World's Classics edition of Rasselas. On the pursuit of happiness in Rasselas, with glances at similar concerns in early America.
  1081. Milton Keynes, “The Miserable Health of Dr Samuel Johnson,” Journal of Medical Biography 3, no. 3 (1 Aug. 1995): 161.
  1082. Dennis Dean Kezar, Jr., “Radical Letters and Male Genealogies in Johnson's Dictionary,” SEL 35, no. 3 (Summer 1995): 493–517.
  1083. Rusi Khan, “Johnson on Life and Death,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 4 (2000): 1–4.
  1084. James Anthony Kilfoyle, “The Social Production of the Man of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” Dissertation Abstracts 55 (1995): 1967–68A. Not seen.
  1085. Phoebe Killey, “A Twentieth Century Journey to Scotland in the Footsteps of Johnson and Boswell,” The New Rambler, D:10 (1994–95), 27–32.
  1086. Bun Kim, “Jenoki e natanan Samuel Johnson eui munhakkwan,” English Studies 12 (1988): 47–63. In Korean. Not seen.
  1087. Moon-Soo Kim, “Johnson munhak e itseosuh eui botong saramdeul e daehan gwansim: Life of Savage reul choolbaljom euro bayeo,” English Studies 10 (1986): 51–67. In Korean. Not seen.
  1088. James King, “Cowper, Hayley, and Samuel Johnson's ‘Republican’ Milton,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 17 (1987): 229–38.
  1089. Mark Kinkead-Weekes, “Defoe and Richardson: Novelists of the City,” in Dryden to Johnson, ed. Roger Lonsdale (New York: Bedrick, 1987), pp. 193–222.
  1090. Thomas E. Kinsella, “The Pride of Literature: Arthur Murphy's Essay on Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 129–56.
  1091. Russell Kirk, “Three Pillars of Modern Order: Edmund Burke, Samuel Johnson, Adam Smith,” Modern Age 25, no. 3 (1981), 226–33. Reprinted in Redeeming the Time (Wilmington: Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 1996), pp. 254–70.
  1092. Harriet Kirkley, “John Nichols, Johnson's ‘Prefaces,’ and the History of Letters,” Review of English Studies, 49, no. 195 (Aug. 1998): 282–305.
  1093. Harriet Kirkley, A Biographer at Work: Samuel Johnson's Notes for the “Life of Pope” (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2002). Pp. 279. Reviews:
  1094. Adam Kirsch, “The Hack as Genius: Dr. Samuel Johnson Arrives at Harvard,” Harvard Magazine 107, no. 2 (Nov.–Dec. 2004): 46–51. On the Hyde Collection of Viscountess Eccles going to the Houghton Library.
  1095. Wallace Kirsop, “A Note on Johnson's Dictionary in Nineteenth-Century Australia and New Zealand,” in An Index of Civilisation: Studies of Printing and Publishing History in Honour of Keith Maslen, ed. Ross Harvey, Wallace Kirsop, and B. J. McMullin (Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Center for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash Univ., 1993), pp. 172–74.
  1096. Wallace Kirsop, Samuel Johnson in Paris in 1775: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 1995 (Melbourne: The Johnson Society of Australia, 1995 [i.e., 1996]).
  1097. Alan Klehr and Winsoar Churchill, “Samuel Johnson & James Boswell: Tour the Western Isles,” British Heritage 22, no. 3 (April–May 2001): 52–58.
  1098. Bernice W. Kliman, “Samuel Johnson, 1745 Annotator? Eighteenth-Century Editors, Anonymity, and the Shakespeare Wars,” Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography n.s. 6, nos. 3–4 (1992): 185–207.
  1099. Bernice W. Kliman, “Samuel Johnson and Tonson's 1745 Shakespeare: Warburton, Anonymity, and the Shakespeare Wars,” in Reading Readings: Essays on Shakespeare Editing in the Eighteenth Century, ed. Joanna Gondris (Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 299–317.
  1100. Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Johnson and the Analogy of Judicial Authority,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 28, no. 1 (Winter 1987): 47–61.
  1101. Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Appreciations: Johnson's Dictionary,” The New York Times, 17 April 2005, section 4, p. 13.
  1102. Peter Kocan, “Johnson and Garrick Leave Lichfield” and “Levet,” in Standing with Friends (Port Melbourne: William Heinemann, 1992): 15, 17. Two poems.
  1103. Robert Charles Koepp, “Johnsonian and Boswellian Strains in Early Nineteenth-Century English Biography,” Dissertation Abstracts International 43, no. 8 (1983), 2680A. Not seen.
  1104. Gwin J. Kolb, ed., Johnson's Dictionary: Catalogue of a Notable Collection of One Hundred Different Editions of Dr. Johnson's “Dictionary of the English Language,” Some of them Exceedingly Scarce, and All Collected with Great Skill and Industry, Offered for Sale as a Collection (Dorking: C. C. Kohler, 1986).
  1105. Gwin J. Kolb, “Studies of Johnson's Dictionary,” Dictionaries 2 (1990): 113–26. Includes commentary on Congleton, DeMaria, Nagashima, and Reddick.
  1106. Gwin J. Kolb, “Sir Walter Scott, ‘Editor’ of Rasselas,” Modern Philology 89 (May 1992): 515–18.
  1107. Gwin J. Kolb, “Scholarly and Critical Responses,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 8–15.
  1108. [Gwin J. Kolb,] The Library of Professor Gwin J. Kolb: Samuel Johnson and His Circle: Along with Other Literature, British and American (St. Paul, Minnesota: Rulon-Miller Books, 2004). Pp. 81. Sale catalogue.
  1109. Gwin J. Kolb and Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Thomas Warton's Observations on the ‘Faerie Queene’ of Spenser Samuel Johnson's ‘History of the English Language,’ and Warton's History of English Poetry: Reciprocal Indebtedness?” Philological Quarterly 74, no. 3 (Summer 1995): 327–35.
  1110. Gwin J. Kolb and Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Dr Johnson's Definition of Gibberish,” N&Q 45, no. 1 (March 1998): 72–74.
  1111. Paul J. Korshin, ed., Johnson after Two Hundred Years (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 1986). Reviews:
  1112. Paul J. Korshin, “Johnson's Rambler and Its Audiences,” in Essays on the Essay: Redefining the Genre, ed. Alexander J. Butrym (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1989), pp. 92–105.
  1113. Paul J. Korshin, “Johnson, Samuel (1709–1784),” in International Encyclopedia of Communications, ed. George Gerbner et al., 4 vols. (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1989): I, 371–72.
  1114. Paul J. Korshin, “‘Extensive View’: Johnson and Boswell as Travelers and Observers,” in All Before Them, ed. John McVeagh, vol. 1 of English Literature in the Wider World (London: Ashfield, 1990), pp. 233–45.
  1115. Paul J. Korshin, “Johnson's Conversation in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 174–93.
  1116. Paul J. Korshin, “Benjamin Franklin and Samuel Johnson: A Literary Relationship,” in Benjamin Franklin: An American Genius, ed. Gianfranca Balestra and Luigi Sampietro (Rome: Bulzoni, 1993), pp. 33–48.
  1117. Paul J. Korshin, “The Founding of The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual,” East-Central Intelligencer n.s. 8, no. 3 (Sept. 1994): 6–7.
    A brief narrative of the early days of the journal.
  1118. Paul J. Korshin, “Johnson, the Essay, and The Rambler,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 51–66.
    Korshin considers The Rambler as an example of the essay genre.
  1119. Paul J. Korshin, “Afterword,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 1091–1100.
    A response to essays by Clark, Griffin, Hudson, Lipking, Reddick, Weinbrot, and others in the same issue.
  1120. Paul J. Korshin, “Reconfiguring the Past: The Eighteenth Century Confronts Oral Culture,” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 235–49.
  1121. Paul J. Korshin, “Samuel Johnson's Life Experience with Poverty,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 3–20.
    A revisionist consideration of Johnson's poverty.
  1122. Paul J. Korshin, “The Mythology of Johnson's Dictionary,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 10–23.
    Korshin demolishes many of the myths and legends that have grown up around the writing of the Dictionary.
  1123. Paul J. Korshin and Jack Lynch, eds., The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual.
    An annual journal, begun in 1987 under the editoriship of Korshin; from vol. 11 to vol. 15, co-edited by Korshin and Lynch; since vol. 16, edited by Lynch.
    Reviews:
  1124. Beth Kowaleski-Wallace, “Tea, Gender, and Domesticity in Eighteenth-Century England,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 23 (1994): 131–45.
  1125. Elizabeth Kraft, with Patrick Fadeley, Brian Lake, Scott Dudley, Bo Franklin, Sarah Fish, Angela Fralish, Corey Goergen, and Jeremiah Wood, “Teaching Samuel Johnson: Teaching Johnson in a Time of War,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 6–10.
    On teaching the Seven Years' War against the background of modern wars. Includes a discussion of a board game called Friedrich.
  1126. Jonathan Brody Kramnick, “Reading Shakespeare's Novels: Literary History and Cultural Politics in the Lennox-Johnson Debate,” Modern Language Quarterly 55, no. 4 (Dec. 1994): 429–53. Reprinted in Eighteenth-Century Literary History: An MLQ Reader, ed. Marshall Brown (Durham: Duke Univ. Press, 1999), pp. 43–67.
  1127. R. S. Krishnan, “‘Imagination Out upon the Wing’: Lockean Epistemology and the Case of the Astronomer in Johnson's Rasselas,” Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 11, nos. 3–4 (Aug. 1990): 332–40.
  1128. R. S. Krishnan, “‘The Shortness of Our Present State’: Locke's ‘Time’ and Johnson's ‘Eternity’ in Rasselas,” Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 19, nos. 1–2 (March 1998): 2–9.
  1129. R. S. Krishnan, “Double Discourse: Narrative Artifice in Johnson's Life of SavageLamar Journal of the Humanities 24, no. 2 (Fall 1999): 13–23.
  1130. Yoshikatsu Kubota, “Encountering the Highlands: Boswell's Journal-Writing and His Divided Scottish Self,” Shiron, 34 (June 1995): 1–20.
  1131. Ingrid Kuczynski, “Ewiger Kreislauf und Fortschritt: Die Aneignung historischer wirklichkeit in Samuel Johnsons ‘A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,’” Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg: Gesellschafts- und Sprachwissenschaftliche Reihe 31, no. 6 (1982), 73–80. In German.
  1132. Ingrid Kuczynski, “A Discourse of Patriots: The Penetration of the Scottish Highlands,” Journal for the Study of British Cultures 4, no. 1/2 (1997): 73–93. Not seen.
  1133. Colby H. Kullman, “James Boswell and the Art of Conversation,” in Compendious Conversations: The Method of Dialogue in the Early Enlightenment, ed. Kevin L. Cope (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1992), pp. 80–92.
  1134. Colby H. Kullman, “‘Are You a Mimic, Mr. Genius?’: Boswell and Johnson on the Art of Mimicry,” Transactions of the Northwest Society for Eighteenth-Century Scotland 19 (1994): 24–29.
  1135. Arun Kumar, “Dr. Johnson on Milton,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 63–74.
  1136. William Kupersmith, “Style and Values: Imitating Samuel Johnson,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 42–48.
  1137. William Kupersmith, “Johnson's London in Context: Imitations of Roman Satire in the Later 1730s,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 1–34.
    Kupersmith places London in the context of other contemporary imitations of classical satire.
  1138. William Kupersmith, “Imitations of Roman Satire in the Later 1730s,” chapter 7 (pp. 136–68), and “The Imitation from 1740 to 1750,” chapter 8 (pp. 169–211), of English Versions of Roman Satire in the Earlier Eighteenth Century (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2007).
    Includes substantial sections on London and The Vanity of Human Wishes, placing them in the context of other classical imitations of the eighteenth century.
  1139. Frederick Kurzer, “Chemistry in the Life of Dr. Samuel Johnson,” Bulletin for the History of Chemistry 29, no. 2 (2004): 65–88. Includes appendices: “List of Johnson's Books on Chemistry and Cognate Subjects,” “List of Books on Chemistry and Cognate Subjects in the Thrales' Library at Streatham,” and “List of Chemical Terms Quoted in Johnson's Dictionary.”
  1140. Paul A. Lacey, “Like a Dog Walking on Its Hind Legs: Samuel Johnson and Quakers,” Quaker Studies 6, no. 2 (March 2002): 159–74.
  1141. Robert Lacey, Great Tales from English History: Captain Cook, Samuel Johnson, Queen Victoria, Charles Darwin, Edward the Abdicator, and More (New York: Little, Brown, 2006). Pp. ix + 305. Not seen.
  1142. Charles LaChance, “‘The Sinking Land’: Pessimism in Johnson's London,” Papers on Language & Literature 31, no. 1 (Winter 1995): 61–77.
  1143. Lawrence Ladin, “What Would Dr. Johnson Think?,” The New York Review of Books 46, no. 11 (24 June 1999): 81–82. Letter on Larry McMurtry's “Chopping Down the Sacred Tree,” speculating on Johnson's attitudes toward Native Americans. There is a reply by McMurtry.
  1144. Allan Laing, “Boswell Wanted to Be Virgil to Johnson's Dante,” The Herald (Glasgow), 26 Aug. 1993, p. 14. On BBC2's Tour of the Western Isles with Coltrane and Sessions.
  1145. Jonathan Lamb, “Blocked Observation: Tautology and Paradox in The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in Cutting Edges: Postmodern Critical Essays on 18th-Century Literature, ed. James Gill (Tennessee Studies in Literature, vol. 37, 1995), pp. 335–46.
  1146. Elizabeth Lambert, “Samuel Johnson's Relationship with Edmund Burke,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 32–39.
  1147. Claire Lamont, “Dr Johnson, the Scottish Highlander, and the Scottish Enlightenment,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 12, no. 1 (Spring 1989): 47–55.
  1148. Claire Lamont, “Johnson and Eighteenth-Century Images of Scotland,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 9–23.
  1149. Claire Lamont, “‘The Final Sentence, and Unalterable Allotment’: Johnson and Death,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 21–33.
  1150. Claire Lamont, “Dr Johnson's Influence on Jane Austen,” The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 38–47.
  1151. Ian Lancashire, “Dictionaries and Power from Palgrave to Johnson,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 24–41.
  1152. Ian Lancashire, “Johnson and Seventeenth-Century English Glossographers,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 157–71.
  1153. Sidney I. Landau, “Johnson's Influence on Webster and Worcester in Early American Lexicography,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 217–29.
  1154. Sara Landreth, “Teaching Samuel Johnson: Teaching Rasselas as Newtonianism: An Experiment in Virtual Conversation,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 10–14.
    Rasselas offers students in a survey course “an entry into the fraught relationship between particularity and generality in the Enlightenment. . . . Drawing parallels between Newton and Johnson . . . can make Rasselas relevant to both majors and non-majors alike.”
  1155. Destyn M. Laporte, “The Progress of the Soul,” M.A. thesis, California State Univ., Dominguez Hills, 1996. Not seen.
  1156. Lyle Larsen, Dr. Johnson's Household (Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1985). Reviews:
  1157. Lyle Larsen, “Dr. Johnson's Friend, the Elegant Topham Beauclerk,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 221–37.
  1158. Lyle Larsen, “Joseph Baretti's Feud with Hester Thrale,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 111–27.
  1159. Lyle Larsen, ed., James Boswell: As His Contemporaries Saw Him (Madison and Teaneck: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Press, 2008). Pp. 256.
    Hundreds of short snippets on Boswell, from the 1760s until after his death, from contemporary writings. Inevitably includes many little-known comments on Johnson from periodicals, diaries, and letters.
  1160. Mary Lascelles, “Walter Raleigh: Six Essays on Johnson,” in Essays on Sir Walter Raleigh 1988, ed. Asloob Ahmad Ansari (Aligarh: Aligarh Muslim Univ., 1988), pp. 60–65.
  1161. Elizabeth Anne Latshaw-Foti, “Social Agendas in Eighteenth-Century Travel Narratives,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 8 (Feb. 2000): 2917A. Univ. of South Florida. Not seen.
  1162. Peter J. Law, “Samuel Johnson on Consumer Demand, Status, and Positional Goods,” European Journal of the History of Economic Thought 11, no. 2 (June 2004): 183–208.
  1163. Jill Lawless, “Samuel Johnson's Dictionary Still a Page-Turner after 250 Years,” Associated Press, 21 April 2005.
  1164. Maureen Lawrence, Resurrection (drama on Johnson and Barber). Reviews:
  1165. Tom O. Lawson, “Pope's An Essay on Man and Samuel Johnson's Duplicitous Reaction to It,” Journal of the English Language and Literature (Seoul), 32, no. 3 (1986): 431–44.
  1166. Mary Lazar, “Sam Johnson on Grub Street, Early Science Fiction Pulps, and Vonnegut,” Extrapolation: A Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy 32, no. 3 (Fall 1991): 235–55.
  1167. Adrian Leak, “How Dr Johnson's Faith Defined His Life and Work,” Church Times, 12 December 2003, pp. 14–15.
  1168. Alexander Leggatt, “Canada, Negative Capability, and Cymbeline,” in Shakespeare in Canada: “A World Elsewhere”?, ed. Diana Brydon and Irena R. Makaryk (Toronto: Univ. of Toronto Press, 2002), pp. 274–91. Not seen.
  1169. Anthony Wayne Lee, “Fathers, Mothers and Mentors: Mentoring Relationships in the Life and Writings of Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 12 (June 2002): 4178A. Univ. of Arkansas. Not seen.
  1170. Anthony W. Lee, “Johnson's Symbolic Mentors: Addison, Dryden, and Rambler 86,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 59–79.
  1171. Anthony W. Lee, Mentoring Relationships in the Life and Writings of Samuel Johnson: A Study in the Dynamics of Eighteenth-Century Literary Mentoring (Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen Press, 2005). Pp. xviii + 276. Not seen. Reviews:
  1172. Anthony W. Lee, “Allegories of Mentoring: Johnson and Frances Burney's Cecilia,” The Eighteenth-Century Novel 5 (2006): 249–76.
  1173. Anthony W. Lee, “Quo Vadis?: Samuel Johnson in the New Millennium,” Modern Philology 104, no. 4 (May 2007): 529–59.
    A substantial omnibus review essay on The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16; Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott, eds., Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary”; Howard D. Weinbrot, Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics; O M Brack Jr., ed., A Commentary on Mr. Pope's Principles of Morality, or Essay on Man; David Hankins and James J. Caudle, eds., The General Correspondence of James Boswell, 1757–1763; Gwin J. Kolb and Robert DeMaria Jr., eds., Johnson on the English Language; Roger Lonsdale, ed., The Lives of the Poets; Helen Deutsch, Loving Dr. Johnson; and Allen Reddick, ed., Samuel Johnson's Unpublished Revisions to the “Dictionary of the English Language”: A Facsimile Edition. This entry is also cited under the reviews of each of these books.
  1174. Anthony W. Lee, “An Intertetxual Node: Johnson's Life of Dryden, Rambler 31, and A Letter from a Gentleman to the Honourable Ed. Howard, Esq., The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 19 (2009): 21–28.
    Lee highlights several previously unnoticed connections between Rambler 31 and the Life of Dryden, tracing both back to an anonymous seventeenth-century satire.
  1175. Anthony W. Lee, “Mentoring and Mimicry in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 51, nos. 1–2 (Spring–Summer 2010): 67–85.
  1176. Anthony W. Lee, “Johnson and Gibbon: An Intertextual Influence?,” The Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer 25, nos. 1–2 (March 2011): 19–27.
  1177. Athony W. Lee, Dead Masters: Mentoring and Intertextuality in Samuel Johnson (Bethlehem: Lehigh Univ. Press, 2011).
  1178. Anthony W. Lee, “Ramazzini, Johnson, and Rambler 85: A New Attribution,” Notes and Queries 60, no. 258 (Dec. 2013): 577–79.
  1179. B. S. Lee, “Johnson's Poetry: A Bicentenary Tribute,” English Studies in Africa 28, no. 2 (1985): 81–98.
  1180. Inkyu Lee, “A Reading of Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” British & American Fiction to 1900 8, no. 2 (Winter 2001): 91–115. Not seen.
  1181. J. H. Leicester, “James Boswell — A Personal Appreciation,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 5–9.
  1182. J. H. Leicester, Mrs. A. G. Dowdeswell, and Miss Stella Pigrome, “Sixty-Five Years in the Company of Dr Johnson and his Friends,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 13–14.
  1183. Seth Lerer, “A Harmless Drudge: Samuel Johnson and the Making of the Dictionary,” chapter 12 (pp. 167–80) of Inventing English: A Portable History of the Language (New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 2007).
    An overview of the Dictionary in Lerer's account of the history of the language. Includes comments on Johnson's use of Locke and Milton, and the tensions he felt between prescriptive and descriptive linguistics.
  1184. Richard Lettis, “Coming from Him,” New York Times Book Review, 23 Sept. 2001, p. 4. Brief letter to the editor on Charles McGrath's review of Sisman's Boswell's Presumptuous Task interpreting “I do indeed come from Scotland, but I cannot help it.”
  1185. William Levine, “The Genealogy of Romantic Literary History: Refigurations of Johnson's Lives of the English Poets in the Criticism of Coleridge and Wordsworth,” Criticism 34 (Summer 1992): 349–78.
  1186. Harry Norman Levinson, “Another Look at Johnson's Appraisal of Swift,” Etudes anglaises 39, no. 4 (Oct.–Dec. 1986): 438–43.
  1187. David Levy, “S. T. Coleridge Replies to Adam Smith's ‘Pernicious Opinion’: A Study in Hermetic Social Engineering,” Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy 14, no. 1 (Jan. 1986): 89–114.
  1188. Aleksandr Libergant, ed., “Krestomatiinyi Dzhonson,” Voprosy literatury 2 (Feb. 1991): 223–36. In Russian.
  1189. C. S. Lim, “Emendation of Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century: The Case of Johnson,” Cahiers Elisabethains 33 (April 1988): 23–30.
  1190. Victor Lindsey, “Dr. Johnson and Dr. Gardner on Nickel Mountain,” in Proceedings of the First Annual John Gardner Conference, ed. Jim Fessenden (West Chester, Penna.: privately printed, 1999), pp. 10–16. Not seen.
  1191. Andro Linklater, “On the road with Johnson & Boswell & Co.,” The Telegraph Magazine, 11 Sept. 1993, p. 36. On BBC2's Tour of the Western Isles with Coltrane and Sessions.
  1192. Lawrence Lipking, “Johnson's Beginnings,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 13–25.
  1193. Lawrence Lipking, “What Was It Like to Be Johnson?” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 35–57.
  1194. Lawrence Lipking, “Learning to Read Johnson: The Vision of Theodore and The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in Modern Essays on Eighteenth-Century Literature, ed. Leopold Damrosch, Jr. (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1988), pp. 335–54.
  1195. Lawrence Lipking, “The Death and Life of Johnson,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 102–11.
  1196. Lawrence Lipking, “Inventing the Common Reader: Samuel Johnson and the Canon,” in Interpretation and Cultural History, ed. Joan H. Pittock and A. Wear (New York: St Martin's Press, 1991), pp. 153–74.
  1197. Lawrence Lipking, “Teaching the Lives of the Poets,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 114–20.
  1198. Lawrence Lipking, “M. Johnson and Mr. Rousseau,” Common Knowledge 3, no. 3 (1994): 109–26.
  1199. Lawrence Lipking, “New Light on Johnson's Duck,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 149–58.
    A facetious take on Johnson's Jacobite sympathies, using “Here Lies Good Master Duck” as evidence.
  1200. Lawrence I. Lipking, “The Jacobite Plot,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 843–55.
  1201. Lawrence Lipking, Samuel Johnson: The Life of an Author (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1998). Reviews:
  1202. A. Livergant, “Edin vo mnogikh litsakh: Esse, stat'i, ocherki i pis'ma,” Voprosy Literatury 2 (March–April 2003): 186–235. Not seen. In Russian.
  1203. Chella Courington Livingston, “Samuel Johnson's Literary Treatment of Women,” Dissertation Abstracts International 46, no. 10 (April 1986): 3041A. Not seen.
  1204. Chella C. Livingston, “Johnson and the Independent Woman: A Reading of Irene,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 219–34.
  1205. Bernard C. Lloyd, “The Discovery of Scott as ‘Editor’ and ‘Author of the Advertisement’ in the Illustrated Edition of Rasselas,” Scott Newsletter 23–24 (Winter 1993–Spring 1994): 9–13.
  1206. Jared C. Lobdell, “C. S. Lewis's Ransom Stories and Their Eighteenth-Century Ancestry,” Word and Story in C. S. Lewis, ed. Peter J. Schakel and Charles A. Huttar (Columbia: Univ. of Missouri Press, 1991), pp. 213–31.
  1207. Allison Lockwood, “Samuel Johnson,” British Heritage, 5, no. 4 (1984): 62–73.
  1208. Arno Loffler, “Die wahnsinnige Heldin: Charlotte Lennox' The Female Quixote,” Arbeiten aus Anglistik und Amerikanistik 11, no. 1 (1986): 63–81. In German.
  1209. April London, “Johnson's Lives and the Genealogy of Late Eighteenth-Century Literary History,” in Critical Pasts: Writing Criticism, Writing History ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2004), pp. 95–113.
  1210. Barbara A. Looney, “The Suppressed Agenda of Boswell's ‘Tour,’” Dissertation Abstracts International 53, no. 3 (Sept. 1992): 819–20A. University of South Florida. Not seen.
  1211. N. F. Löwe, “Sam's Love for Sam: Samuel Beckett, Dr. Johnson and Human Wishes,” Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd'hui: An Annual Bilingual Review/Revue Annuelle Bilingue 8 (1999): 189&ndasdh;203.
  1212. A. D. Luca, “Candide Rasselas and the Genre of the Philosophical Tale in English and French Literature of the Eighteenth Century,” doctoral dissertation, Univ. of Kent, 1996. Not seen.
  1213. John Lucas, “Travel: Defining Image of Wit and Wisdom,” The Daily Telegraph, 16 July 1994, p. 33.
  1214. Nestor Lujan, “Samuel Johnson,” Historia y vida, 17, no. 194 (1984): 88–95. In Spanish.
  1215. Paul Luna, “The Typographic Design of Johnson's Dictionary,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 175–97.
  1216. F. Luoni, “Recit, exemple, dialogue,” Poetique 74 (1988): 211–32. In French.
  1217. Irma S. Lustig, “Boswell without Johnson: The Years After,” The New Rambler D:1 (1985–86), 36–38.
  1218. Irma S. Lustig, “Facts and Deductions: The Curious History of Reynolds's First Portrait of Johnson, 1756,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 161–80.
  1219. Irma S. Lustig, ed., Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995). Reviews:
  1220. Irma S. Lustig, “‘My Dear Enemy’: Margaret Montgomerie Boswell in the Life of Johnson,” in Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters, ed. Irma S. Lustig (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995), pp. 228–45.
  1221. Irma S. Lustig, “The Myth of Johnson's Misogyny in the Life of Johnson: Another View,” in Boswell in Scotland and Beyond, ed. Thomas Crawford (Glasgow: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1997), pp. 71–88.
  1222. Deidre Lynch, “‘Beating the Track of the Alphabet’: Samuel Johnson, Tourism, and the ABCs of Modern Authority,” ELH, 57, no. 2 (Summer 1990): 357–405.
  1223. Jack Lynch, “Studied Barbarity: Johnson, Spenser, and the Idea of Progress,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 81–108.
    An examination of eighteenth-century conceptions of literary progress, exemplified by Johnson's reading of Edmund Spenser. A version of this essay appeared as a chapter in Lynch, The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson.
  1224. Jack Lynch, “Johnson, Politian, and Editorial Method,” N&Q 45, no. 1 (March 1998): 70–72.
    Johnson's Shakespeare edition was the first to introduce some of Politian's editorial methods into the editing of vernacular texts.
  1225. Jack Lynch, “A Bibliography of Johnsonian Studies, 1986–1997,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 405–519.
    A preliminary version of the AMS publication below, and the germ of this on-line resource.
  1226. John T. Lynch, “The Revival of Learning: The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 59, no. 7 (Jan. 1999): 2678A. University of Pennsylvania.
    An early version of The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson, below.
  1227. Jack Lynch, “Betwixt Two Ages Cast: Milton, Johnson, and the English Renaissance,” Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (2000): 397–413.
    On the periodization of Milton's major works, written in the Restoration but treated as Renaissance texts.
  1228. Jack Lynch, A Bibliography of Johnsonian Studies, 1986–1998 (New York: AMS Press, 2000). Pp. xvi + 147.
    A printed version of an earlier draft of this bibliography.
    Reviews:
  1229. Jack Lynch, “Samuel Johnson's ‘Love of Truth’ and Literary Fraud,” Studies in English Literature 1500–1900 41, no. 3 (Summer 2002): 601–18.
    On SJ's involvement with literary fakers, including Macpherson, Chatterton, Psalmanazar, and Dodd.
  1230. Jack Lynch, The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2003). Pp. xi + 224.
    Examines 18th-c. British notions of what is now called the Renaissance, with SJ at the center.
    Reviews:
  1231. Jack Lynch, “Johnson and Hooker on Ecclesiastical and Civil Polity,” The Review of English Studies 55, no. 218 (Jan. 2004): 45–59.
    On SJ's reading in Richard Hooker and his ideas on theology, church governance, and “things indifferent.”
  1232. Jack Lynch, “Reading Johnson's Unreadable Dictionary,” one-hour address at the Boston Athenæum, 15 January 2004, broadcast on C-SPAN2's Book TV, 31 Jan. 2004, 8 Feb. 2004, and 22 Feb. 2004.
    An unscholarly lecture on the attractions of the illustrative quotations in the Dictionary.
  1233. Jack Lynch, “Samuel Johnson,” in The Thoemmes Press Dictionary of British Classicists, 1500–1960, ed. Robert B. Todd, 3 vols. (Bristol: Thoemmes Press, 2004).
    A brief encyclopedia entry, focusing on Johnson's knowledge of the classics.
  1234. Jack Lynch, “Johnson's Encyclopedia,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 129–46.
    On the boundary between dictionaries, limited to lexical information, and encyclopedias, which are more expansive, and the ways in which SJ's Dictionary often crosses the line.
  1235. Jack Lynch, ed., Samuel Johnson's Insults: A Compendium of Snubs, Sneers, Slights, and Effronteries from the Eighteenth-Century Master (Delray Beach, Fla.: Levenger Press; New York: Walker & Co., 2004). Pp. 113. Published in the UK as Samuel Johnson's Insults: A Compendium of His Finest Snubs, Slights and Effronteries (London: Atlantic Books, 2005). Pp. 136.
    An unscholarly collection of insults and put-downs, culled from both the Dictionary and SJ's conversation.
    Reviews:
  1236. Jack Lynch, “Dr. Johnson's Revolution,” The New York Times, 2 July 2005, A15 (OpEd). Reprinted as “Samuel Johnson: Words for a New Nation,” in The International Herald Tribune, 5 July 2005, p. 9.
    An Op-Ed essay on the importance of SJ's Dictionary in early America, including SJ's principles of selection.
  1237. Jack Lynch, “Samuel Johnson, Unbeliever,” Eighteenth-Century Life 29, no. 3 (Fall 2005): 1–19.
    On SJ's engagement with philosophical skepticism, from Sextus Empiricus to Hume.
  1238. Jack Lynch, “The Dignity of an Ancient: Johnson Edits the Editors,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 97–114.
    On Johnson's development of the variorum form in his edition of Shakespeare, with examples from his edition of Lear.
  1239. Jack Lynch, “The Life of Johnson, the Life of Johnson, the Lives of Johnson,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 131–44.
    A consideration of Johnson's influence on later biographers, and the kinds of events he found particularly important in the various Lives of the Poets.
  1240. Jack Lynch, “Enchaining Syllables, Lashing the Wind: Samuel Johnson Lays Down the Law,” chapter 4 (pp. 71–93) of The Lexicographer's Dilemma: The Evolution of “Proper” English, from Shakespeare to “South Park” (New York: Walker & Company, 2009).
    On debates over descriptive and prescriptive lexicography, and Johnson's debt to the tradition of the common law.
  1241. Jack Lynch, ed., Samuel Johnson in Context (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012). Pp. xxxii + 440.
  1242. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott, eds., Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary” (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005). Pp. xi + 245.
    Fourteen original scholarly essays on previously neglected areas of the Dictionary.
    Reviews:
  1243. Steven Lynn, “Johnson's Rambler and Eighteenth-Century Rhetoric,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 19 (Summer 1986): 461–79.
  1244. Steven Lynn, “Sexual Difference and Johnson's Brain,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 123–49.
  1245. Steven Lynn, “Locke's Eye, Adam's Tongue, Johnson's Word: Language, Marriage, and ‘The Choice of Life,’” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 35–61.
  1246. Steven Lynn, Samuel Johnson after Deconstruction: Rhetoric and The Rambler (Carbondale: Southern Illinois Univ. Press, 1992). Reviews:
  1247. Steven Lynn, “Johnson's Critical Reception,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 240–53.
  1248. Marie E. McAllister, “Gender, Myth, and Recompense: Hester Thrale's Journal of a Tour to Wales,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 265–82.
  1249. Stephen McCaffery, “Prior to Meaning: The Protosemantic and Poetics,” Dissertation Abstracts International 59, no. 1 (1998): 166A. SUNY Buffalo. Not seen. Includes a section on the theories of language implicit in the Dictionary.
  1250. A. C. McDermott, “The Logic and the Epistemological Sanctions of Dr. Johnson's Arguments,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 2 (Aug. 1990): 526A. Not seen.
  1251. Anne McDermott, “Johnson's Use of Shakespeare in the Dictionary,” The New Rambler D:5 (1989–90), 7–16.
  1252. Anne McDermott, “A Corpus of Source Texts for Johnson's Dictionary,” Corpora Across the Centuries: Proceedings of the First International Colloquium on English Diachronic Corpora, ed. Merja Kytö, Matti Rissanen and Susan Wright (Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi, 1994), pp. 151–54.
  1253. Anne McDermott, “The Reynolds Copy of Johnson's Dictionary: A Re-Examination,” Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester 74, no. 1 (Spring 1992): 29–38.
  1254. Anne McDermott, “The ‘Wonderful Wonder of Wonders’: Gray's Odes and Johnson's Criticism,” in Thomas Gray: Contemporary Essays, ed. W. B. Hutchings (Liverpool: Liverpool Univ. Press, 1993), pp. 188–204.
  1255. Anne McDermott, “The Defining Language: Johnson's Dictionary and Macbeth,” Review of English Studies 44, no. 176 (Nov. 1993): 521–38.
  1256. Anne McDermott, “The Intertextual Web of Johnson's Dictionary and the Concept of Authorship,” in Early Dictionary Databases, ed. Ian Lancashire and T. Russon Wooldridge, CCH Working Papers 4 (Toronto: Univ. of Toronto, 1994), pp. 165–72; reprinted in Publications de l'Institut national de la langue française: Dictionairique et lexicographie vol. 3, Informatique et dictionnaires anciens (1995): ed. Bernard Quemada, pp. 165–71.
  1257. Anne McDermott, “Textual Transformations: The Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus in Johnson's Dictionary,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 133–48.
  1258. Anne McDermott, “The Making of Johnson's Dictionary on CD-ROM,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1995–96), 29–37.
  1259. Anne McDermott, “Preparing the Dictionary for CD-ROM,” The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 17–25.
  1260. Anne McDermott, “Johnson's Dictionary and the Canon: Authors and Authority,” The Yearbook of English Studies, 28 (1998): 44–65.
  1261. Anne McDermott, “Samuel Johnson, Dictionary,” in A Companion to Literature from Milton to Blake ed. David Womersley (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), pp. 353–59.
  1262. Anne McDermott, “Samuel Johnson, Rasselas,” in A Companion to Literature from Milton to Blake, ed. David Womersley (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), pp. 360–65.
  1263. Anne McDermott, “Creating an Electronic Edition of Johnson's Dictionary: Developments of Solutions to Some Problems,” in Standards und Methoden der Volltextdigitalisierung, ed. Thomas Burch, Johannes Fournier, Kurt Grtner, and Andrea Rapp (Mainz: Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur, 2003), pp. 153–60.
  1264. Anne McDermott, “Johnson the Prescriptivist? The Case for the Defense,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 113–28.
  1265. Anne McDermott, “Johnson's Definitions of Technical Terms and the Absence of Illustrations,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 173–87.
  1266. Anne McDermott, “The Compilation Methods of Johnson's Dictionary,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 1–20. Reprinted in Ashgate Critical Essays on Early English Lexicographers, Volume 5: The Eighteenth Century, ed. Anne McDermott (Farnham: Ashgate; 2012), pp. 105–24.
  1267. Anne McDermott, “Johnson's Editing of Shakespeare in the Dictionary,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 115–38.
    “Lexicography and textual criticism were . . . reciprocal activities and both were part of a larger project to purify the English language, to set it on a par with the languages of France and Italy as exhibited in their great national lexicons, and by a parallel to present Shakespeare as a great national writer.”
  1268. Anne McDermott and Marcus Walsh, “Editing Johnson's Dictionary: Some Editorial and Textual Considerations,” in The Theory and Practices of Text-Editing: Essays in Honour of James T. Boulton, ed. Ian Small and Marcus Walsh (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 35–61.
  1269. D. L. Macdonald, “Eighteenth-Century Optimism as Metafiction in Pale Fire,” The Nabokovian 14 (Spring 1985): 26–32.
  1270. Murdo Macdonald, “The Torrent Shrieks,” Edinburgh Review 96 (1996): 99–108.
  1271. Wallace MacDougall, “Three Writers of Eighteenth-Century Lichfield: Johnson, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 9 (Aug. 2007): 33–46.
    Not seen.
  1272. Nicholas McDowell, “Levelling Language: The Politics of Literacy in the English Radical Tradition, 1640–1830,” Critical Quarterly 46, no. 2 (2004): 39–62.
  1273. Nancy A. Mace, “What Was Johnson Paid for Rasselas?” Modern Philology 91 (May 1994): 455–58.
  1274. John G. McEllhenney, “John Wesley and Samuel Johnson: A Tale of Three Coincidences,” Methodist History 21, no. 3 (1983), 143–55.
  1275. John G. McEllhenney, “Two Critiques of Wealth: John Wesley and Samuel Johnson Assess the Machinations of Mammon,” Methodist History 32, no. 3 (April 1994): 147.
  1276. Natasha McEnroe, “17 Gough Square,” The New Rambler, E:2 (1998–99), 32–37.
  1277. Natasha McEnroe, “Protection from the Tyranny of Treatment,” History Today 53, no. 10 (Oct. 2003): 5–6. Not seen.
  1278. Natasha McEnroe, “Defining the English Language,” Language Magazine 2, no. 9 (May 2003): 24–25. Not seen.
  1279. Natasha McEnroe, “Samuel Johnson and John Wesley,” The New Rambler E:6 (2002–3): 34–39.
  1280. Natasha McEnroe and Robin Simon, eds., The Tyranny of Treatment: Samuel Johnson, His Friends and Georgian Medicine (London: The British Art Journal and Dr Johnson's House Trust, 2003). Pp. 52. (Essays to accompany an exhibition at Dr. Johnson's House.)
  1281. Neil Macfadyen, “Johnson House, Gough Square, Renovations,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 82–83.
  1282. Duncan McFarlane, “On the Doctor and The Clockmaker: The Satire of the Classical Epigraph through Samuel Johnson and T. C. Haliburton,” Translation & Literature 21, no. 1 (Spring 2012): 1–20.
  1283. Ian McGowan, “Boswell at Work: The Revision and Publication of The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” in Tradition in Transition: Women Writers, Marginal Texts, and the Eighteenth-Century Canon, ed. Alvaro Ribeiro and James G. Basker (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), pp. 127–43.
  1284. Thomas Daniel McGrath, “From Tragedy to Hope: A Study of the Parallels in the Thought of Samuel Johnson and T. S. Eliot,” M.A. Thesis, Eastern Illinois University, 1994. Not seen.
  1285. Helen-Louise McGuffie, “The Harmful Drudge,” The New Rambler D:2 (1986–87), 17–19. On Johnson's reputation.
  1286. R. J. McGuill, “Prime Time for Dr. Johnson,” Advertising Age 55 (1 Oct. 1984): 20. Cartoon.
  1287. Lawrence C. McHenry, Jr., “Dr. Samuel Johnson's Head-Tilt — A Hitherto Unrecognized Example of IVth Cranial Nerve Palsy,” Neurology 33, no. 4 suppl. 2 (1983), 230.
  1288. John MacInery, “Johnson and the Art of Translation,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 19–20.
  1289. Raymond G. McInnis, “Discursive Communities/ Interpretive Communities: The New Logic, John Locke and Dictionary-Making, 1660–1760,” Social Epistemology 10, no. 1 (Jan.–March 1987): 107–22.
  1290. Carey McIntosh, “Rhetoric and Runts: Boswell's Artistry,” in Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters, ed. Irma S. Lustig (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995), pp. 137–57.
  1291. Carey McIntosh, “Elementary Rhetorical Ideas and Eighteenth-Century English,” Language Sciences 22, no. 3 (July 2000): 231–49.
  1292. Ian McIntyre, Hester: The Remarkable Life of Dr. Johnson's “Dear Mistress” (London: Constable, 2008). Pp. 450.
    A comprehensive biography of Hester Thrale Piozzi.
    Reviews:
  1293. Ruth Mack, “The Historicity of Johnson's Lexicographer,” Representations 76 (Fall 2001): 61–87.
  1294. Ruth Ellen Mack, “The Historicity of Johnson's Lexicographer,” chapter 2 of “Literary Historicity: Literary Form and Historical Thinking in Mid-Eighteenth-Century England,” Ph.D. dissertation, Johns Hopkins University, 2003, pp. 43–101. Not seen.
  1295. Ruth Mack, “Too Personal? Teaching the Preface,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 9–13.
  1296. Ruth Mack, “The Limits of the Senses in Johnson's Scotland,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 54, no. 2 (Summer 2013): 279–94. <--4/18/14-->
    On “scientific viewing” in Johnson's Journey to the Western Islands, including its relation to empirical philosophy and its role in anthropology.
  1297. Alan T. McKenzie, “The Systematic Scrutiny of Passion in Johnson's Rambler,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 20 (Winter 1986–87), 129–52. Appears in a revised version as “The Moral Force of the Passions in The Rambler,” in Certain, Lively Episodes: The Articulation of Passion in Eighteenth-Century Prose (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1990): 171–93.
  1298. Alan McKenzie, “Johnson's ‘Life of Foucault’: A Pastirody,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 10 (2004): 189–204.
  1299. Niall MacKenzie, “‘A Great Affinity in Many Things’: Further Evidence for the Jacobite Gloss on ‘Swedish Charles,’” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 255–72.
    MacKenzie considers the Jacobite readings of “Swedish Charles” in The Vanity of Human Wishes.
  1300. Niall MacKenzie, “A Jacobite Undertone in ‘While Ladies Interpose’?,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 265–94.
  1301. Lachlan Mackinnon, “Translating a Self,” Cambridge Review 112, no. 2313 (1991): 70–73.
  1302. David McKitterick, “Thomas Osborne, Samuel Johnson and the Learned of Foreign Nations: A Forgotten Catalogue,” The Book Collector 41, no. 1 (Spring 1992): 55–68.
  1303. Duncan McCoshan (“Knife”), “Publication Day for Johnson's Dictionary,” The New Statesman, 1 Aug. 1997, p. 37; reprinted in Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1997): 48. Cartoon.
  1304. James McLaverty, “From Definition to Explanation: Locke's Influence on Johnson's Dictionary,” Journal of the History of Ideas 47, no. 3 (July–Sept. 1986): 377–94.
  1305. James McLaverty, “Dr Fleeman's Bibliography of Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:1 (1997–98), 3–12.
  1306. Sam McManis, “Attitude: What Samuel Johnson Had in Abundance,” The News Tribune (Tacoma, WA), 8 May 2005.
    A brief introduction to the Dictionary.
  1307. Fiona MacMath, ed., The Faith of Samuel Johnson: An Anthology of His Spiritual and Moral Writings and Conversation (London: Mowbray, 1990). With illustrations by E. H. Shepard.
  1308. Fiona MacMath, “Dr Johnson, Strictly Speaking,” The Times, 26 March 1991, 14. On Johnson's religious torment.
  1309. Larry McMurtry, reply to Lawrence Ladin, “What Would Dr. Johnson Think?,” The New York Review of Books 46, no. 11 (24 June 1999): 81–82. Response on Johnson's attitudes toward Native Americans.
  1310. James Andrew McWard, “Factual Ambiguity: Boswell and the Development of the Individual Life,” chapter 4 of “Writing and Reading the Individual: The Development of Personal Narrative in the Works of Defoe, Richardson, and Boswell,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 8 (Feb. 2000): 2941A. Univ. of Kansas. Not seen.
  1311. John L. Mahoney, “The True Story: Poetic Law and License in Johnson's Criticism,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 6 (2001): 185–98.
  1312. John L. Mahoney, “Contemporary Attitudes toward Biography and the Case of Walter Jackson Bate's Samuel Johnson,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 6 (2001): 333–47.
  1313. Christopher J. Malone, “Philosophical and Biographical Hermeneutics: An Essay on History and Understanding,” M.A. Thesis, Fordham University, 1994. Not seen.
  1314. Martin Maner, “The Probable and the Marvelous in Johnson's ‘Life of Milton,’” Philological Quarterly 66, no. 3 (Summer 1987): 391–409.
  1315. Martin Maner, The Philosophical Biographer: Doubt and Dialectic in Johnson's “Lives of the Poets” (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1988). Reviews:
  1316. Martin Maner, “Samuel Johnson, Scepticism, and Biography,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 12, no. 4 (Fall 1989): 302–19.
  1317. Martin Maner, “Johnson's Redaction of Hawkesworth's Swift,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 311–34.
  1318. Giorgio Manganelli, Vita di Samuel Johnson, ed. Viola Papetti, Biblioteca di studi inglesi no. 3 (Rome: Edizioni di storia e letteratura, 2002). Pp. xii + 55.
    Not seen. In Italian.
  1319. Giorgio Manganelli, Vita di Samuel Johnson, ed. Salvatore S. Nigro (Milan: Adelphi, 2008). Pp. 114.
    Not seen. Advertised as “The ‘synthetic biography’ of Johnson that Marcel Schwob always hoped for.” In Italian.
  1320. R. Mankin, “Memories and Anecdotes of Samuel Johnson,” Quinzaine littéraire 907 (16 Sept. 2005): 17.
    Not seen.
  1321. Katherine Mannheimer, “Personhood, Poethood, and Pope: Johnson's Life of Pope and the Search for the Man behind the Author,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 40, no. 4 (Summer 2007): 631–???.
    [Author's abstract:] In his biographical preface on Pope, Samuel Johnson attempts to distinguish between “man” and “writer”; but the distinction was one that Pope had preemptively blurred, in both what and how he published. A conflict thus arises in the two writers' portrayals of author vis-à-vis work, art vis-à-vis life. Ultimately, the nature of this conflict is historically determined: Johnson's biography of Pope points toward the origins of “the author” not just as legal and economic entity, but as Cultural Icon, marking a turning-point in the history not just of “the author,” but of “the life of the author.”
  1322. Michael J. Marcuse, “Miltonoklastes: The Lauder Affair Reconsidered,” Eighteenth-Century Life 4 (1978), 86–91.
  1323. Michael J. Marcuse, “The Gentleman's Magazine and the Lauder/Milton Controversy,” Bulletin of Research in the Humanities 81 (1978), 179–209.
  1324. Michael J. Marcuse, “The Pre-Publication History of William Lauder's Essay on Milton's Use and Imitation of the Moderns in His Paradise Lost,” Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 72 (1978), 37–57.
  1325. Michael J. Marcuse, “‘The Scourge of Impostors, the Terror of Quacks’: John Douglas and the Exposé of William Lauder,” The Huntington Library Quarterly, 42 (1978–79), 231–61.
  1326. H. Markel, “The Death of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: A Clinicopathologic Conference,” American Journal of Medicine 62, no. 6 (June 1987): 1203–7.
  1327. Jean I. Marsden, “The Individual Reader and the Canonized Text: Shakespeare Criticism after Johnson,” Eighteenth-Century Life 17, no. 1 (1993): 62–80.
  1328. Anthony Marshall, “Getting to Know the Doctor: A Bookseller Sees the Light,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 5 (2001): 29–36.
  1329. Peter Martin, “Edmond Malone, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Dr. Johnson's Monument in St. Paul's Cathedral,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 331–51.
  1330. Peter Martin, The Life of James Boswell (London: Weidenfield & Nicholson, 1999). Reviews:
  1331. Peter Martin, Samuel Johnson: A Biography (London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 2008; Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard Univ. Press, 2008). Pp. 608.
    A biography, written largely for a trade audience, based on wide reading in the published sources.
    Reviews:
  1332. Louis Wirth Marvick, Mallarmé and the Sublime (Albany: State Univ. of New York Press, 1986): chapters 4–6, pp. 25–45.
  1333. Silvia Masi, “Lexicographic Material under Observation: From Johnson's Dictionary to a Model for a Cognition-Based Dictionary of Lexical Patterns,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 237–58. Not seen.
  1334. Craig T. Mason, “Biographies of Samuel Johnson,” TLS, 6 Nov. 2009, p. 6.
    A letter to the editor, responding to H. J. Jackson's TLS review of Peter Martin's biography of Johnson and identifying typographical, grammatical, and factual errors.
  1335. Tom Mason and Adam Rounce, “‘Looking Before and After’? Reflections on the Early Reception of Johnson's Critical Judgments,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 134–66.
  1336. Heather Masri, “Counsel for the Defense: Boswell Represents Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 58, no. 9 (1997): 3538A. New York University. Not seen.
  1337. Robert U. Massey, “Dr. Johnson and His Burden of Illness,” Connecticut Medicine 57, no. 8 (Aug. 1993): 561.
  1338. R. K. Mathur, “Dr. Johnson and Modern American and British Criticism,” Indian Journal of American Studies 21, no. 2 (1991): 25–37. Not seen.
  1339. Jack Matthews, “The Dictionary: The Poetry of Definitions,” Antioch Review 51, no. 2 (Spring 1993): 294–300.
  1340. Robert J. Mayhew, “Samuel Johnson on Landscape, Natural Knowledge and Geography: A Contextual Approach,” unpublished doctoral dissertation, Univ. of Oxford, 1996. Not seen.
  1341. Robert J. Mayhew, Geography and Literature in Historical Context: Samuel Johnson and Eighteenth-Century English Conceptions of Geography (Oxford: School of Geography, University of Oxford, 1997).
  1342. Robert Mayhew, “Samuel Johnson's Intellectual Character as a Traveler: A Reassessment,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 35–65.
  1343. Robert J. Mayhew, “Nature and the Choice of Life in Rasselas,” SEL 39, no. 3 (Summer 1999): 539–56.
  1344. Robert J. Mayhew, Landscape, Literature and English Religious Culture, 1660–1800: Samuel Johnson and Languages of Natural Description (Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). Pp. vi + 426. Reviews:
  1345. Catherine Ann Mayne, “Dr. Samuel Johnson: Between Hope and Insanity,” M.A. thesis, California State Univ., Long Beach, 1996. Not seen.
  1346. Christopher Mayo, “‘A Lord among Wits’: Lord Chesterfield and His Reception of Johnson's Celebrated Letter,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 38–42.
  1347. David Mazella, “‘Be Wary, Sir, When You Imitate Him’: The Perils of Didactism in Tristram Shandy,” Studies in the Novel 31, no. 2 (Summer 1999): 152–77.
  1348. Jerome Meckier, “Dickens, Great Expectations and the Dartmouth College Notes,” Papers on Language & Literature 28, no. 2 (Spring 1992): 111–32.
  1349. Robert Gardner Meeker, “A Descriptive Analysis of the Kinds of Essays in Johnson's ‘Rambler,’” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 2 (Aug. 1990): 513A. Not seen.
  1350. Thomas K. Meier, “Johnson and Boswell in Scotland: The Interplay of Prejudice and Patriotism,” in Time, Literature and the Arts: Essays in Honor of Samuel L. Macey, ed. Thomas R. Clearey (Victoria, B.C.: Univ. of Victoria, 1994), pp. 100–13.
  1351. Wilfrid Mellers, “Samuel Johnson,” TLS, 30 Aug. 1991, p. 13.
  1352. Iu. K. Mel'vil' and S. A. Sushko, “Argument Doktora Dzhonsona: Semiuel Dzhonson kak Kritik Berkli,” Voprosy Filosofii (1981 no. 3), 133–44. On Johnson's critique of Berkeley. In Russian.
  1353. Roy W. Menninger, M.D., “Johnson's Psychic Turmoil and the Women in His Life,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 179–200.
  1354. James H. Merrell, “Johnson and Boswell on National Public Radio,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 19–20. Two pieces from “Writer's Almanack,” read by Garrison Keillor, on the anniversary of Boswell's meeting with Johnson and the anniversary of the Dictionary's publication.
  1355. Bernard C. Meyer, “Notes on Flying and Dying,” Psychoanalytic Quarterly 52, no. 3 (July 1983), 327–52.
  1356. Bernard C. Meyer and D. Rose, “Remarks on the Etiology of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome,” Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases 174, no. 7 (July 1986): 387–96.
  1357. Laure Meyer, “Reynolds: la fusion de l'histoire et de la realité,” L'Oeil (Lausanne), 363 (Oct. 1985): 20–27.
  1358. Jeffrey Meyers, “Johnson, Boswell & the Biographer's Quest,” The New Criterion 21, no. 3 (Nov. 2002):35–40.
  1359. Jeffrey Meyers, “Johnson, Boswell and Modern Biography,” The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 50–59.
  1360. Jeffrey Meyers, “Samuel Demands the Muse: Johnson's Stamp on Imaginative Literature,” Antioch Review 65, no. 1 (Winter 2007): 39–49.
    Not seen.
  1361. Jeffrey Meyers, Samuel Johnson: The Struggle (New York: Basic Books, 2008). Pp. xv + 528.
    A substantial biography, focusing on Johnson's struggles with adversity, including illnesses, psychological torment, and poverty.
    Reviews:
  1362. Jeffrey Meyers “Johnson and Thucydides,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 42–44.
    A note on Johnson's knowledge of the Greek historian, especially as it appears in his Debates in Parliament.
  1363. Jeffrey Meyers, “Sometimes Counsel Take, and Sometimes Tea: Samuel Johnson at Home,” in Afterword: Conjuring the Literary Dead, ed. Dale Salwak (Iowa City: Univ. of Iowa Press, 2011), pp. ???.
  1364. Jeffrey Meyers, “Samuel Johnson and Patrick O'Brian,” Notes on Contemporary Literature 42, no. 4 (Sept. 2012): 8–10.
  1365. Chris Mihill, “Why Mozart Behaved So Badly,” The Guardian, 27 Dec. 1992, p. 4. Speculation that Mozart and Johnson may have suffered from Tourette's Syndrome.
  1366. Chris Miller, “The Pope and the Canon: Eliot, Johnson, Davie and The Movement,” PN Review 23, no. 6 (1997): 45–50. Not seen.
  1367. Luree Miller, “Literary Villages of London: In the Footsteps of Dr. Johnson, Thomas Carlyle, John Keats and Virginia Woolf,” The Washington Post, 3 Dec. 1989, p. E1.
  1368. Stephen Miller, “Why Read Samuel Johnson?” Sewanee Review 107, no. 1 (Winter 1999): 44–60. Reprinted in The New Rambler E:3 (1999–2000): 38–45.
  1369. Stephen Miller, Three Deaths and Enlightenment Thought: Hume, Johnson, Marat (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001). Pp. 219. Reviews:
  1370. Stephen Miller, “Samuel Johnson and George Washington,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 35–36.
  1371. Stephen Miller, “Samuel Johnson: A Conversational Triumph; Lady Mary Wortley Montagu: Conversation Lost,” chapter 5 (pp. 79–118???) of Conversation: History of a Declining Art (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2006).
    Not seen.
  1372. Peter Milward, “Shakespeare's ‘Fatal Cleopatra,’” Shakespeare Studies (Tokyo), 30 (1992): 57–63.
  1373. Earl Miner, Naming Properties: Nominal Reference in Travel Writings by Basho and Sora, Johnson and Boswell (Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press, 1996). Reviews:
  1374. Carolyn Misenheimer, “Dr. Johnson and Charles and Mary Lamb: Intellectual Assumptions in the Art of Writing for Children,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 23–36.
  1375. James B. Misenheimer, Jr., “Johnson and the Critic as Idealist: Some Reflections on Famous Passages from his Criticism,” The New Rambler C:26 (1985–86), 16–33.
  1376. James B. Misenheimer, Jr., “Johnson and Critical Expectation,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 13–30.
  1377. James B. Misenheimer, Jr., “Dr. Johnson, Warren Cordell, and the Love of Books,” in Bibliographia, ed. John Horden (Oxford: Leopard's Head Press, 1992), pp. 87–103.
  1378. James Misenheimer, “Dr Johnson and the Ascent to Immortality: An Aspect of his Legacy,” The New Rambler, D:9 (1993–94), 51–65.
  1379. James B. Misenheimer, Jr., “Wisdom as Intellectual Decoration: Selected Passages from Dr Johnson,” The New Rambler E:6 (2002–3): 26–33.
  1380. James B. Misenheimer, Jr., and Robert K. O'Neill, “The Cordell Collection of Dictionaries and Johnson's Lexicographic Presence: The Love of Books in Two Centuries,” The New Rambler C:24 (1983), 33–47.
  1381. James B. Misenheimer, Jr., and Veva Vonler, “Intellectual Eclecticism: A Ramble through the Rambler,” The New Rambler D:6 (1990–91), 16–28.
  1382. Linda C. Mitchell, “Johnson among the Early Modern Grammarians,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 203–16.
  1383. Takeshi Mitsunaga, “Miruton no tame no bengo: Kekkon ni tsuite no Bairon no shiku o megutte,” Kumamoto Daigaku Eigo Eibungaku/Kumamoto Studies in English Language amp; Literature 45 (2002): 33–42. In Japanese. Not seen.
  1384. Kasujiro Miyoshi, “Priestley no eibunten to Johnson no eigojiten,” The Journal of Okayama Women's Junior College 10 (1987): 49–57. In Japanese.
    “Priestley's Rudiments and Johnson's Dictionary.” Not seen.
  1385. Kusujiro Miyoshi, “Johnson no jiten: Yourei no gogakushiteki igi,” The Journal of Okayama Women's Junior College 12 (1989): 125–33. In Japanese.
    “Johnson's Dictionary: The Linguistic Significance of Its Citations.” Not seen.
  1386. Kusujiro Miyoshi, “S. Johnson to tairiku no gengo academy: hin'yodoshi no koumoku wo chushin ni',” Journal of Soka Women's College 12 (1997): 63–77. In Japanese.
    “The Influence of Continental Language Academies on S. Johnson: His Treatment of Verbs of High Frequency.” Not seen.
  1387. Kusujiro Miyoshi, Johnson's and Webster's Verbal Examples: With Special Reference to Exemplifying Usage in Dictionary Entries (Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag, 2007). Pp. xiv + 222.
    An extensive comparative study of Johnson's and Webster's use of examples, with much of the evidence drawn from the letter L in both dictionaries.
  1388. David Money, “Samuel Johnson and the Neo-Latin Tradition,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 199–221.
  1389. Paul Monod, “A Voyage out of Staffordshire; or, Samuel Johnson's Jacobite Journey,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 11–43.
  1390. John Warwick Montgomery, “The Religion of Dr. Johnson,” New Oxford Review 61, no. 7 (Sept. 1994): 19.
  1391. Ellen Moody, “Johnson-and-Boswell Forever!,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 22–26. On an Internet reading group approaching Boswell's Life.
  1392. Isaac Morales Fernández, “W. Shakespeare ante Samuel Jonson,” Dramateatro Revista Digital 9 (Jan.–May 2003): n.p. (electronic publication). In Spanish.
  1393. Lee Morgan, “Dr. Johnson and ‘His Own Dear Master,’ Henry Thrale,” Publications of the Arkansas Philological Association 15 (April 1989): 84–96.
  1394. Lee Morgan, Dr. Johnson's “Own Dear Master”: The Life of Henry Thrale (Lanham, Md.: Univ. Press of America, 1998). Reviews:
  1395. C. Morrant, “The Melancholy of Dr. Samuel Johnson,” CMAJ 136, no. 2 (15 Jan. 1987): 201–3.
  1396. Jerry Morris “Library Thing,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 18.
    On the inclusion of Johnson's and Boswell's libraries in the on-line service Library Thing.
  1397. Matthew Charles Evans Morris, “Parody in Pale Fire: A Re-Reading of Boswell's Life of Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 57, no. 5 (Nov. 1996): 2028A. Not seen.
  1398. Richard Morrison, “A Man of Many Words (Including Jobbernowl),” The Times, 15 April 2005, pp. T2, T5.
  1399. Sarah R. Morrison, “Toil, Envy, Want, the Reader, and the Jail: Reader Entrapment in Johnson's Life of Savage,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 145–64.
  1400. Sarah R. Morrison, “Samuel Johnson, Mr. Rambler, and Women,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 23–50.
  1401. Alain Morvan, “Nekayah, Pekuah et les autres: Aspects de la feminité dans Rasselas,” Bulletin de la societé d'études anglo-americaines des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles 20 (June 1985): 139–52. In French.
  1402. Andrew Motion, Michael Holroyd, and Victoria Glendinning, “A Biographer Is a Novelist under Oath,” The Guardian, 16 May 1998, p. 8.
  1403. Wesley T. Mott, “The Book of Common Prayer and Boswell's Life of Johnson: Sources of a Defining Emersonian Phrase,” Notes and Queries 59, no. 257 (Sept. 2012): 345–47.
  1404. Beverly Trescott Mueller, “The Invincible Samuel Johnson,” chapter 10 of “The Depiction of Religion in Eighteenth-Century English Literature from Swift to Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 5 (Nov. 1999): 1714A. Marquette Univ. Not seen.
  1405. L. C. Mugglestone, “Samuel Johnson and the Use of /h/,” N&Q 36, no. 4 (Dec. 1989): 431–33.
  1406. Lynda Mugglestone, “Departures and Returns: Writing the English Dictionary in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries,” in The Victorians and the Eighteenth Century: Reassessing the Tradition, ed. Francis O'Gorman and Katherine Turner (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004), pp. 144–62.
  1407. John Muirhead, “A Model for Johnson's Polyphilus,” N&Q 33, no. 4 (Dec. 1986): 514–17.
  1408. Gurudas Mukherjee, “Johnson the Juggler with Three Balls: Fancy, Reason, and Faith,” in Modern Studies and Other Essays in Honour of Dr. R. K. Sinha, ed. R. C. Prasad and A. K. Sharma (New Delhi: Vikas, 1987), pp. 195–98.
  1409. Jessica Munns, “The Interested Heart and the Absent Mind: Samuel Johnson and Thomas Otway's The Orphan,” ELH 60, no. 3 (Fall 1993): 611–23.
  1410. T. J. Murray, “The Medical History of Doctor Samuel Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1992): 26–34. Reprints item 3:773.
  1411. T. J. Murray, “Dr. James and Dr. Johnson,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 3–5.
  1412. T. J. Murray, “Johnson's Relationship with his Physicians,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 58–67.
  1413. T. Jock Murray, “Samuel Johnson: His Ills, His Pills and His Physician Friends,” Clinical Medicine 3, no. 4 (July–Aug. 2003): 368–37.
  1414. Valerie Grosvenor Myer, “Dr Johnson, Fanny Burney and Jane Austen,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 66–78.
  1415. Jeffrey Myers, “Shade's Shadow,” The New Criterion 24, no. 9 (May 2006): 31–35.
    On Johnson's influence on Nabokov's Pale Fire.
  1416. Alan Nadel, “‘My Mind Is Weak, but My Body Is Strong’: George Plimpton and the Boswellian Tradition,” Midwest Quarterly 30, no. 3 (Spring 1989): 372–86.
  1417. Daisuke Nagashima, Dokuta Jonson Meigenshu (Sayings of Dr. Johnson) (Tokyo: Taishukan, 1984). In Japanese.
  1418. Daisuke Nagashima, Johnson the Philologist (Hirakata: Intercultural Research Inst., Kansai Univ. of Foreign Studies, 1988). Reviews:
  1419. Daisuke Nagashima, “Johnson's Use of Skinner and Junius,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 283–98.
  1420. Daisuke Nagashima, “Hyde Collection, The Johnsonians Nenkai sonota, I: 1988 nen Hobei no Tabi kara,” Eigo Seinen 134 (n.d.), 593–85. In Japanese.
  1421. Daisuke Nagashima, “Jonson no Eigojiten shinkenkyu” (A new study of Johnson's Dictionary [by Allen Reddick]), Eigo Seinen (The Rising Generation) 137, no. 3 (June 1991): 138–39. In Japanese.
  1422. Daisuke Nagashima, “Progressive or Conservative? Two Trends in Johnson Studies,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 43–47.
  1423. Daisuke Nagashima, “Johnson in Japan: A Fragmentary Sketch,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1993): 14–19.
  1424. Daisuke Nagashima, “Samuel Johnson: The Road to the Dictionary,” Studies in English Literature (Japan), 72 (1995): 63–75.
  1425. Daisuke Nagashima, “How Johnson Read Hale's Origination for His Dictionary: A Linguistic View,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 247–98.
  1426. Daisuke Nagashima, “Johnson's Revisions of His Etymologies,” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 94–105.
  1427. Daisuke Nagashima, “The Biblical Quotations in Johnson's Dictionary,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 89–126.
  1428. Daisuke Nagashima, “Dr Johnson's Dictionary: A Philological Survey,” Bulletin of Koshien University College of Humanities 4:C (2000): 1–22.
  1429. Daisuke Nagashima, “On Johnson's Handwriting,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 1 (March 2005): 31–34.
  1430. Daisuke Nagashima, “Two Pen-and-Ink Inscriptions on Copies of Johnson's Dictionary in Japan,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 36–38.
  1431. Akio Nakahara, Johnson den no keifu (Tokyo: Kenkyushashuppan, 1991). In Japanese.
  1432. Akio Nakahara, Jisho no Jonson no seiritsu: bozuueru nikki ka denki e (Tokyo: Eihosha, 1999). Pp. 386. In Japanese. Not seen.
  1433. Richard Nash, Wild Enlightenment: The Borders of Human Identity in the Eighteenth Century (Charlottesville: Univ. of Virginia Press, 2003), chapter 5 (“Walk Scotland and Carry a Big Stick”), pp. 131–55.
  1434. Ghazi Q. Nassir, “A History and Criticism of Samuel Johnson's Oriental Tales,” Dissertation Abstracts International 50, no. 3 (Sept. 1989 Sept), 692A. Not seen.
  1435. Prem Nath, ed., Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson: Essays in Criticism (Troy: Whitston, 1987). Reviews:
  1436. Prem Nath, “Johnson's London Re-Examined,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 215–26.
  1437. Nicolas H. Nelson, “Narrative Transformations: Prior's Art of the Tale,” Studies in Philology 90, no. 4 (Fall 1993): 442–61.
  1438. Melvyn New, “Rasselas in an Eighteenth-Century Novels Course,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 121–27.
  1439. Melvyn New and Gerard Reedy, Theology and Literature in the Age of Johnson: Resisting Secularism (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2012). Pp. xxi + 350.
  1440. Peter New, “Re-Reading Johnson,” in New Trends in English and American Studies: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference, Cracow, 1990, April 2–7 (Cracow: Towarzystwo Autorów i Wadawców Prac Naukowych “Universitas,” 1992), pp. 57–72.
  1441. Donald J. Newman, “Disability, Disease, and the ‘Philosophical Heroism’ of Samuel Johnson in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” A/B: Auto/Biography Studies 6, no. 1 (Spring 1991): 8–16.
  1442. Donald J. Newman, ed., James Boswell: Psychological Interpretations (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995). Reviews:
  1443. Ray Andrew Newman, “Samuel Johnson's View of Human Nature and its Relationship to his Political, Societal and Religious Concepts,” M.A. Thesis, University of Wyoming, 1995. Not seen.
  1444. David Newnham, “The Outsider: Play it Again, Sam: David Newnham Visits the Rose-Red City where Dr Johnson, Lexicographer and Clever-Clogs Learnt His Letters,” The Guardian, 31 July 1999, Travel, p. 9.
  1445. Don Nichol, “The Big English Dictionary at 250,” The Globe and Mail, 15 April 2005, p. A14.
  1446. Graham Nicholls, “A New Look for the Birthplace,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 19–22.
  1447. Graham Nicholls, “A Newly Discovered Johnson Letter,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 74–89.
  1448. Graham Nicholls, “English Literature in the Time of Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1992): 14–25.
  1449. Graham Nicholls, “Thomas Harwood's Copy of Boswell's ‘Life of Johnson,’ ‘An Account of the Life of Dr Samuel Johnson Written by Himself,’ and a Local Rumour about Nathaniel Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1994): 23–26.
  1450. Graham Nicholls, “Four Quotations of Samuel Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1997): 1–10. Presidential address to the Johnson Society, 20 Sept. 1997.
  1451. Graham Nicholls, “‘Better Acquainted with My Heart’: Johnson's Friendship with John Taylor,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), 1997, 30–35.
  1452. Graham Nicholls, “Johnson Reads for the Dictionary,” The New Rambler E:3 (1999–2000): 29–34.
  1453. Graham Nicholls, “‘The General Disease of My Life’: Samuel Johnson and His Health,” in The Tyranny of Treatment: Samuel Johnson, His Friends, and Georgian Medicine, ed. Natasha McEnroe and Robin Simon (London: The British Art Journal and Dr Johnson's House Trust, 2003), pp. 12–17.
  1454. Graham Nichols, “Four Quotations of Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 3–10.
  1455. G. W. Nicholls and R. W. White, “Young Samuel Johnson and His Birthplace,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 3.
  1456. Michelle Nichols, “Johnson's Bawdy Truth Found in Print,” The Scotsman, 7 December 2000, p. 5. On the sale of a copy of a rare cancel in Boswell's Life.
  1457. Eirwen E. C. Nicholson, “The St. Clement Danes Altarpiece and the Iconography of Post-Revolution England,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 55–76.
  1458. David Nokes, “Johnson and Swift,” The New Rambler, C:26 (1985–86), 35–36.
  1459. David Nokes, Samuel Johnson: A Life (London: Faber, 2009). Pp. 448.
    An original biography, drawing largely from the published sources but not always the familiar ones. Nokes works to set Johnson in his historical context, and pays particular attention to his finances.
    Reviews:
  1460. Maximillian E. Novak, “‘Rotation of Interests’: Johnson's Concept of Social and Historical Encounter and Change,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 43–62.
  1461. Maximillian E. Novak, “James Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in The Biographer's Art: New Essays, ed. Jeffrey Myers (Basingstoke: McMillan, 1987): 31–52.
  1462. Maximillian E. Novak, “Warfare and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century Fiction: or, Why Eighteenth-Century Fiction Failed to Produce a War and Peace,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction 4, no. 3 (1992): 185–205.
  1463. Felicity A. Nussbaum, The Autobiographical Subject: Gender and Ideology in Eighteenth-Century England (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1989), chapter 4 (“Manly Subjects: Boswell's Journals and The Life of Johnson”), pp. 103–26.
  1464. Felicity A. Nussbaum, “‘Savage’ Mothers: Narratives of Maternity in the Mid-Eighteenth-Century,” Cultural Critique 20 (1991–92), 123–51.
  1465. William B. Ober, “Johnson and Boswell: ‘Vile Melancholy’ and ‘The Hypochondriack,’” in Bottoms Up!: A Pathologist's Essays on Medicine and the Humanities (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1987), pp. 179–202.
  1466. Conor Cruise O'Brien, “Samuel Johnson and Edmund Burke,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1993): 1–7.
  1467. Conor Cruise O'Brien, “Dr Johnson and Edmund Burke,” The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 25–32.
  1468. Karen O'Brien, “Johnson's View of the Scottish Enlightenment in A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 59–82.
  1469. Brenda O'Casey, ed., The Sayings of Doctor Johnson (London: Duckworth, 1990).
  1470. Jeffrey O'Connell and Thomas E. O'Connell, Friendships across Ages: Johnson and Boswell: Holmes and Laski (Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2008). Pp. viii + 193.
    A comparison of two friendships. Johnson and Boswell are the subject of chapters 1 (“From Doctor Johnson to Justice Holmes to Professor Laski,” pp. 9–25), 2 (“Johnson,” pp. 27–54), and 3 (“Boswell,” pp. 55–66), though they appear throughout the book.
  1471. James Ogden, “A Johnson Borrowing from Milton,” N&Q 39, no. 4 (Dec. 1992): 482.
  1472. Andrew O'Hagan, “The Laird of Life; Boswell's Life of Johnson Is the First Great Modern Biography,” The Guardian, 16 May 1998, Features, p. 8. Discussion of the Life with literary biographers.
  1473. Brian O'Kill, The Lexicographic Achievement of Johnson (Harlow, Essex, England: Longman, 1990). Part of the Longman facsimile edition of Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language.
  1474. Robert C. Olson, “Samuel Johnson's Ambivalent View of Classical Pastoral,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 31–42.
  1475. Walter J. Ong, “Samuel Johnson and the Printed Word,” Review 10 (1988): 97–112.
  1476. Stephen Orgel, “Johnson's Lear,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 181–202.
    On the treatment of Lear in the eighteenth century, including Tate's famous revision. Johnson appears only in passing.
  1477. Eric Ormsby, “The Boundless Chaos of a Living Speech,” The New York Sun, 16 Nov. 2005.
  1478. Mary Terese Ortiz, “‘On the Margins of Eternity’: A Reconsideration of Hope in the Writings of Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 9 (March 2000): 3378A. Not seen.
  1479. Toni O'Shaughnessy, “Fiction as Truth: Personal Identity in Johnson's Life of Savage,” SEL 30, no. 3 (Summer 1990): 487–501.
  1480. Mark Hazard Osmun, “Touring Scotland: In the Footsteps of Dr. Johnson and Mr. Boswell,” The San Francisco Examiner, 25 June 1995, p. T1.
  1481. Noel E. Osselton, “Dr. Johnson and the English Phrasal Verb,” in Lexicography: An Emerging International Profession, ed. R. Ilson (Manchester: Manchester Univ. Press, 1986), pp. 7–16.
  1482. Noel E. Osselton, “Alphabetisation in Monolingual Dictionaries to Johnson,” Exeter Linguistic Studies 14 (1989) [i.e., Lexicographers and Their Works], 165–73.
  1483. Noel Osselton, “Dr. Johnson and the Spelling of Dispatch,” International Journal of Lexicography 7, no. 4 (Winter 1994): 307.
  1484. Noel E. Osselton, “Phrasal Verbs: Dr. Johnson's Use of Bilingual Sources,” in Chosen Words: Past and Present Problems for Dictionary Makers (Exeter: Univ. of Exeter Press, 1995), pp. 93–103. A lightly revised reprint of “Dr. Johnson and the English Phrasal Verb,” above.
  1485. Noel E. Osselton, “Hyphenated Compounds in Johnson's Dictionary,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 160–74.
  1486. Noel E. Osselton, “Usage Guidance in Early Dictionaries of English,” International Journal of Lexicography 19, no. 1 (March 2006): 99–105. Not seen.
  1487. Maurice J. O'Sullivan, “Shakespeare, Johnson, and Wolsey: A Community of Mind,” Sydney Studies in English 14 (1988–89), 13–20.
  1488. Meurig Owen, A Grand Tour of North Wales: An Eighteenth Century Jaunt of Castles and Mansions (Llanrwst: Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, 2003). Pp. 116.
  1489. K. A. J. Page, “Samuel Johnson's Rasselas and its Intellectual Background,” Ph.D. Dissertation, Birkbeck College, University of London, 1984. Not seen.
  1490. Norman Page, ed., Dr. Johnson: Interviews and Recollections (Totowa, N.J.: Barnes and Noble, 1987). Reviews:
  1491. Norman Page, A Dr. Johnson Chronology (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1990). Reviews:
  1492. Chance David Pahl, “Teleology in Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature 64, no. 3 (Spring 2012): 221–32.
  1493. S. L. Pal, “Johnson's Philosophy of Life and Literature,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 25–34.
  1494. Anthony Palmer, “The Proper Use of Words: Criticism within the Way of Ideas,” in Science and Imagination in XVIIIth-Century British Culture/ Scienza e immaginazione nella cultura inglese del Settecento, ed. Sergio Rossi and Guilio Giorello (Milan: Unicopli, 1987), pp. 287–95.
  1495. Radhe Shyam Pandey, Dr. Samuel Johnson as Critic (Patna: Uma Publications, 1987).
  1496. Shormishtha Panja, “‘Tumour, Meanness, Tediousness and Obscurity’: Dr. Johnson's Reading of Hamlet,” Hamlet Studies: an International Journal of Research on the Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke 20, no. 1–2 (Summer–Winter 1998): 107–16. Not seen.
  1497. Hye-Young Park, “The Politics of Johnson's Reading of ‘Lycidas’ and the Social Aspect of Pastoral Poetry,” in Milton Studies: The Journal of the Milton Studies in Korea 12, no. 1 (2002): 83–101. Not seen.
  1498. Jai Young Park, “Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia: A Pilgrimage of Buddhists,” The Journal of English Language & Literature 48, no. 4 (Winter 2002): 955–70. Not seen.
  1499. Catherine N. Parke, “Rasselas and the Conversation of History,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 79–109.
  1500. Catherine N. Parke, “Johnson, Imlac, and Biographical Thinking,” in Domestic Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 85–106.
  1501. Catherine N. Parke, “Samuel Johnson and Melodrama,” The New Rambler D:5 (1989–90), 29–37.
  1502. Catherine N. Parke, “‘The Hero Being Dead’: Evasive Explanation in Biography: The Case of Boswell,” Philological Quarterly 68, no. 3 (Summer 1989): 343–62.
  1503. Catherine Neal Parke, Samuel Johnson and Biographical Thinking (Columbia: Univ. of Missouri Press, 1991). Reviews:
  1504. Catherine N. Parke, “Negotiating the Past, Examining Ourselves: Johnson, Women, and Gender in the Classroom,” South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 71–80.
  1505. Catherine N. Parke, “Samuel Johnson and Gender,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 19–27.
  1506. Catherine N. Parke, Biography: Writing Lives (New York: Twayne, 1996), chapter 2 (“Majority Biography 1: Samuel Johnson”), pp. 35–66.
  1507. Catherine N. Parke, “Johnson and the Arts of Conversation,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 18–33.
  1508. Blanford Parker, The Triumph of Augustan Poetics: English Literary Culture from Butler to Johnson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998), chapter 7 (“Johnson and Fideism”), pp. 231–49.
  1509. G. F. Parker, “Johnson's Criticism of Shakespeare,” Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Cambridge, 1986. Not seen.
  1510. G. F. Parker, Johnson's Shakespeare (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989). Reviews:
  1511. Fred Parker, “The Skepticism of Johnson's Rasselas,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 127–42.
  1512. Fred Parker, “Johnson and the ‘Lives of the Poets,’” Cambridge Quarterly 29, no. 4 (Dec. 2000): 323–37. Not seen.
  1513. Fred Parker, Scepticism and Literature: An Essay on Pope, Hume, Sterne, and Johnson (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2003), chapters 1 (“Rational Ignorance and Sceptical Thinking,” pp. 1–53) and 6 (“Johnson's Conclusiveness,” pp. 232–81). Reviews:
  1514. Fred Parker, “‘We Are Perpetually Moralists’: Johnson and Moral Philosophy,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 15–32.
    Not seen???
  1515. B. Parry-Jones, “A Bulimic Ruminator? The Case of Dr. Samuel Johnson,” Psychological Medicine 22, no. 4 (Nov. 1992): 851.
  1516. Douglas Lane Patey, “Johnson's Refutation of Berkeley: Kicking the Stone Again,” Journal of the History of Ideas 47, no. 1 (Jan.–March 1986): 139–45.
  1517. Melissa Patterson, “Nathan Bailey's Dictionary: Signs of Its Author, Readers, and Influence on Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 21 (2011): 93–122.
  1518. Laura A. Payne, “The Success of Johnson's Irene,” The New Rambler D:4 (1988–89), 27–36.
  1519. Laura Payne, “Hammond, Johnson and the Most Difficult Book in the World,” The New Rambler D:6 (1990–91), 5–6.
  1520. Linda R. Payne, “An Annotated Life of Johnson: Dr. William Cadogan on ‘Bozzy’ and His Bear,” Collections 2 (1987): 1–25.
  1521. Michael Payne, “Imaginative Licentiousness: Johnson on Shakespearean Tragedy,” The New Rambler D:4 (1988–89), 38–48.
  1522. Michael Payne, “Imaginative Licentiousness: Johnson on Shakespearean Tragedy,” College Literature 17, no. 1 (1990): 66–78.
  1523. Michael Payne, “Johnson vs. Milton: Criticism as Inquisition,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 31–44; reprinted in College Literature 19, no. 1 (Feb. 1992): 60–74.
  1524. Christopher P. Pearce, “Terms of Corruption: Samuel Johnson's Dictionary in Its Contexts,” Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Texas, 2004. Reviews:
  1525. Chris Pearce, “Johnson's Proud Folio: The Material and Rhetorical Contexts of Johnson's Preface to the Dictionary,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 1–35.
  1526. Chris P. Pearce, “The Pleasures of Polysemy: A Plan for Teaching Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language in an Eighteenth-Century Course,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 10–14.
  1527. Chris P. Pearce, “Recovering the ‘Rigour of Interpretative Lexicography’: Border Crossings in Johnson's Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 33–50. Not seen.
  1528. Edward Pearce, “Commentary: A Prospect to Please Dr Johnson,” The Guardian, 25 Nov. 1992, p. 18.
  1529. J. M. S. Pearce, “Fanny Burney on Samuel Johnson's Tics and Mannerisms,” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 57, no. 3 (March 1994): 380.
  1530. J. M. S. Pearce, “Doctor Samuel Johnson: ‘The Great Convulsionary’ a Victim of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome,” Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 87, no. 7 (1 July 1994): 396.
  1531. Hesketh Pearson, Johnson and Boswell: The Story of Their Lives with a new introduction by Michael Holroyd (London: Cassell, 1987).
  1532. Mark Alan Pedreira, “Samuel Johnson's Rhetorical Art: Topical and Figurative Copia in the Age of Locke,” Dissertation Abstracts International 55, no. 10 (April 1995): 3200A. University of Maryland, College Park.
  1533. Mark Pedreira, “Johnsonian Figures: Copia and Lockean Observation in Samuel Johnson's Critical Writings,” 1650–1850 1 (1994): 157–96.
  1534. Mark Pedreira, “Johnsonian Figures: A Cornucopia of Vanity, Idleness, and Death in Samuel Johnson's Prose Writings,” 1650–1850 2 (1996): 247–73.
  1535. Juan Christian Pellicer, “Dryden, Chesterfield, and Johnson's ‘Celebrated Letter’: A Case of Compound Allusion,” Notes & Queries 48, no. 246 (Dec. 2001): 413–14.
  1536. Carol Percy, “The Social Symbolism of Contractions and Colloquialisms in Contemporary Accounts of Dr. Samuel Johnson: Bozzy, Piozzi, and the Authority of Intimacy,” Historical Sociolinguistics and Sociohistorical Linguistics 2, no. 1 (January 2002). Online.
  1537. David Perman, Scott of Amwell: Dr. Johnson's Quaker Critic (Ware, Herts.: Rockingham Press, 2001). Pp. 368. Reviews:
  1538. Lidie Ann Risher Phillips, “Samuel Johnson's Rasselas: Portrait of the Artist,” M.A. thesis, East Carolina University, 1986. Not seen.
  1539. Liza Picard, Dr Johnson's London (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2000). Reviews:
  1540. [Add to item 24:197] Charles E. Pierce, The Religious Life of Samuel Johnson (London: Athlone Press; Hamden, Conn.: Archon, 1983). Reviews:
  1541. Päivi Pietilä, “The Lives of the Poets: The More Readable Dr. Johnson,” in Alarums and Excursions: Working Papers in English (Turku, Finland: Univ. of Turku, 1990), pp. 125–41. Not seen.
  1542. Laura Pinnavaia, “Idiomatic Expressions Regarding Food and Drink in Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language (1755 and 1773),” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 151–66. Not seen.
  1543. Silvia Pireddu, “The ‘Landscape of the Body’: The Language of Medicine in Johnson's Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 107–30. Not seen.
  1544. E. W. Pitcher, “The Moralist Serial in The Federal Gazette of 1798,” American Notes & Queries 8, no. 1 (1995): 16–18.
  1545. Murray G. H. Pittock, “Johnson and Scotland,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 184–96.
  1546. Lilian Pizzichini, “A Journey into Hypertext: Two Artists are Recreating the Scottish Travels of the Celebrated Literary Duo James Boswell and Samuel Johnson,” The Independent, 15 April 1996, p. 12.
  1547. Jeffrey Plank, “Johnson's Lives and Augustan Poetry,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 373–87.
  1548. Jeffrey Plank, “Reading Johnson's Lives: The Forms of Late Eighteenth-Century Literary History,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 335–52.
  1549. Bill Plante, “[Bill Plante Discusses the Birthday of Samuel Johnson],” broadcast on CBS-TV (“Sunday Morning”), 18 Sept. 1988. Not seen.
  1550. Wayne W. Plasha, “The Social Construction of Melancholia in the Eighteenth Century: Medical and Religious Approaches to the Life and Work of Samuel Johnson and John Wesley,” M.Litt. Thesis, Faculty of Modern History, University of Oxford, 1993.
  1551. Mary Sue Ply, “Samuel Johnson's Journeys into the Past,” Dissertation Abstracts International 44, no. 11 (1984), 3391A. Not seen.
  1552. Markus Joachim Poetzsch, “Theoretical and Practical Biography: Principles, Problems, Processes and the Inscrutable Subject in Samuel Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” M.A. Thesis, Univ. of Alberta, 2000. Not seen.
  1553. Kristin Hatch Pollack, “Samuel Johnson, Feminist,” M.A. Thesis, Southwest Texas State University, 1988. Not seen.
  1554. Julian Pooley, “‘And Now a Fig for Mr Nichols!’: Samuel Johnson, John Nichols and Their Circle,” The New Rambler E:7 (2003–4): 30–45.
  1555. Julian Pooley, “‘Conciliating His Esteem’: John Nichols's Contribution to Johnson's Lives of the Poets, to Biographies of Johnson, and to Later Johnsonian Scholarship,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 21 (2011): 143–92.
  1556. David Porter, “Writing China: Legitimacy and Representation, 1606–1773,” Comparative Literature Studies 33, no. 1 (Winter 1996): 98–122.
  1557. Roy Porter, “‘Mad All My Life’: The Dark Side of Samuel Johnson,” History Today 34 (Dec. 1984): 43–46.
  1558. Roy Porter, “‘The Hunger of Imagination’: Approaching Samuel Johnson's Melancholy,” in The Anatomy of Madness: Essays in the History of Psychiatry, ed. William Bynum, Roy Porter, and Michael Shepherd (London: Tavistock, 1985): I, 63.
  1559. Martin Postle, “Johnson, Joshua Reynolds and ‘Renny Dear,’” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 13–21.
  1560. Adam Potkay, “The Spirit of Ending in Johnson and Hume,” Eighteenth-Century Life 16, no. 3 (Nov. 1992): 153–66.
  1561. Adam Potkay, “Happiness in Johnson and Hume,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 165–86.
  1562. Adam Potkay, The Passion for Happiness: Samuel Johnson and David Hume (Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press, 2000). Pp. xv + 241. Reviews:
  1563. Adam Potkay, “‘The Structure of His Sentences Is French’: Johnson and Hume in the History of English,” Language Sciences 22, no. 3 (July 2000): 285–93.
  1564. Adam Potkay, “Samuel Johnson,” in British Writers: Retrospective Supplement 1, ed. Jay Parini (Farmington Hills, Michigan: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2002), pp. 137–50.
  1565. J. Enoch Powell, “Rasselas,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 30–40.
  1566. J. Enoch Powell, “Cathedral Address,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 73–76.
  1567. Manushag N. Powell, “Johnson and His ‘Readers’ in the Epistolary Rambler Essays,” Studies in English Literature 1500–1900 44, no. 3 (Summer 2004): 571–94.
  1568. Stephen S. Power, “Through the Lens of Orientalism: Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” West Virginia University Philological Papers 40 (1994): 6–10.
  1569. Nagendra Prasad, Personal Bias in Literary Criticism (Dr Johnson, Matthew Arnold, T. S. Eliot) (New Delhi: Sarup & Sons, 2002), chapter 3 (“Dr. Johnson”), pp. 44–94.
  1570. Michael B. Prince, Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment: Theology, Aesthetics, and the Novel (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1996). Not seen.
  1571. Irwin Primer, “Tracking a Source for Johnson's Life of Pope,” Yale University Library Gazette 61, nos. 1–2 (Oct. 1986): 55–60.
  1572. William Pritchard, “What Johnson Means to Me: Reading Johnson When Young,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 6–9.
    A personal meditation on Pritchard's early experience with Johnson.
  1573. Clive Probyn, “Surfacing and Falling into Matter: Johnson, Swift, Disgust and Beyond,” Mattoid 48, no. 1 (“The Disgust Issue”) (1994): 37–43.
  1574. Clive Probyn, “Eve, Savage's Mother, and Learned Ladies: Johnson, Boswell and Women,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2, no. 1 (1998): 15–24.
  1575. Clive Probyn, “Pall Mall and the Wilderness of New South Wales”: Samuel Johnson, Watkin Tench and “Six” Degrees of Separation (Melbourne: Privately printed for the Johnson Society of Australia, 1998). The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture for 1997.
  1576. Clive Probyn, “Johnson and Romance,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 6 (2002): 20–25.
  1577. Clive Probyn, “Referencing the Real: Hugh Blair, Samuel Johnson, and the Limits of Representation,” in New Windows on a Woman's World: Essays for Jocelyn Harris 2 vols. ed. Colin Gibson and Lisa Marr (Dunedin, N.Z.: Dept. of English, University of Otago, 2005): I, 258–75.
  1578. Francine Prose, “Hester Thrale,” in The Lives of the Muses: Nine Women & the Artists They Inspired (New York: HarperCollins, 2002), pp. 27–56.
  1579. Clotilde Prunier, “Les Traditions des Highlanders: Des Superstitions qui ont reussi?,” Etudes Ecossaises 7 (2001): 125–39. Not seen.
  1580. Peter Quennell, “Who Can Like the Highlands?” Horizon 15, no. 2 (1973), 89–103.
  1581. Melissa R. Quigg, “Mental Illness as Subject and Symptom: Examining the Literature of Samuel Johnson and Christopher Smart,” M.A. thesis, Univ. of Calgary, 2004. Not seen.
  1582. Laura Ellen Quinney, “Johnson in Mourning: The Authority and the Love of Mimesis,” Dissertation Abstracts International 48, no. 9 (March 1988): 2346A. Not seen.
  1583. Laura Quinney, Literary Power and the Criteria of Truth (Gainesville: Univ. Press of Florida, 1995): chapter 2 (“Johnson in Mourning”), pp. 29–53; chapter 3 (“The Grimness of the Truth”), pp. 55–85.
  1584. Melinda Alliker Rabb, “Johnson, Lilliput, and Eighteenth-Century Miniature,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 46, no. 2 (Winter 2013): 281–98.
    On Johnson's observation that “there is nothing too little for so little a creature as man” read against contemporary miniatures, including in Swift's Gulliver.
  1585. John B. Radner, “Boswell's and Johnson's Sexual Rivalry,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 201–46.
  1586. John B. Radner, “From Paralysis to Power: Boswell with Johnson in 1775–1778,” in James Boswell: Psychological Interpretations, ed. Donald J. Newman (New York: St. Martin's, 1995), pp. 127–48.
  1587. John B. Radner, “Pilgrimage and Autonomy: The Visit to Ashbourne,” in Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters, ed. Irma S. Lustig (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995), pp. 203–27.
  1588. John B. Radner, “‘A Very Exact Picture of His Life’: Johnson's Role in Writing The Life of Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 299–342.
  1589. John B. Radner, “Teaching Boswell's Life of Johnson,” East-Central Intelligencer 13, no. 2 (May 1999): 11–15.
  1590. John B. Radner, “Constructing an Adventure and Negotiating for Narrative Control: Johnson and Boswell in the Hebrides,” in Literary Couplings: Writing Couples, Collaborators, and the Construction of Authorship, ed. Marjorie Stone and Judith Thompson (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 2006), pp. 59–78. Not seen.
  1591. John B. Radner, Johnson and Boswell: A Biography of Friendship (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2012). Pp. xii + 415. Reviews:
  1592. Irina Raicu, “The Violence of Purgation in Henry Vaughan's Silex Scintillans: Singing Best When the Nest Is Broken,” in The Image of Violence in Literature, the Media, and Society, ed. Will Wright and Steven Kaplan (Pueblo, CO: Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery, 1995), pp. 96–103.
  1593. Paul Ramsey, “Samuel Johnson at Twenty,” Johnsonian News Letter 47, nos. 3–4 (Sept.–Dec. 1988): 12. Poem on Johnson.
  1594. Dave Randle, A Troublesome Disorder (Lydd: Bank House Books, 2002). Pp. 152. Fictional treatment of a conversation between Johnson and Francis Barber.
  1595. Judith L. Rapoport, “The Biology of Obsessions and Compulsions,” Scientific American 260, no. 3 (1 March 1989): 82.
  1596. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso, eds., Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson (New York: AMS Press, 2007). Pp. vii + 245.
    A collection of ten original essays on Johnson and Shakespeare, from a conference in April 2005 in Reno and Lake Tahoe.
    Reviews:
  1597. James Raven, “Dr Johnson's Fleet Street and the Sites of Publishing in Eighteenth-Century London,” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 11–12.
  1598. David H. Rawlinson, “Presenting Its Evils to Our Minds: Imagination in Johnson's Pamphlets,” English Studies, 70, no. 4 (Aug. 1989): 315–27.
  1599. Claude Rawson, “Johnson's Doctorate,” TLS, 12–18 Oct. 1990, p. 1099. Reply to Greene and Jones.
  1600. Claude Rawson, “A Working Life,” The New Criterion, 17, no. 10 (June 1999): 74–78.
  1601. Claude Rawson, “Cooling to a Gypsy's Lust: Johnson, Shakespeare, and Cleopatra,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 203–38.
    On Johnson's admiration for Antony and Cleopatra.
  1602. Krishna Rayan, “Resistance in Reading,” English, 41, no. 171 (1992): 249–53.
  1603. Allen H. Reddick, “Hopes Raised for Johnson: An Example of Misleading Descriptive and Analytical Bibliography,” TEXT: Transactions of the Society for Textual Scholarship 2 (1985): 245–49.
  1604. Allen Reddick, “Bate and Johnson,” Erato: The Harvard Book Review 5 and 6 (Summer and Fall, 1987).
  1605. Allen Hilliard Reddick, “The Making of Johnson's Dictionary 1746–55 and 1771–73,” Dissertation Abstracts International 48, no. 8 (Feb. 1988): 2068–69A. Not seen.
  1606. Allen Reddick, The Making of Johnson's “Dictionary,” 1746–1773 (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1990). Reviews:
  1607. Allen Reddick, Johnson's “Dictionary”: The Sneyd-Gimbel Copy (Cambridge, Mass.: Privately printed for the Johnsonians, 1991).
  1608. Allen Reddick, “Teaching the Dictionary,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 84–91.
  1609. Allen Reddick, “Johnson Beyond Jacobitism: Signs of Polemic in the Dictionary and the Life of Milton,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 983–1005.
  1610. Allen Reddick, “Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language and Its Texts: Quotation, Context, Anti-Thematics,” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 66–76.
  1611. Allen Reddick, “Revision and the Limits of Collaboration: Hands and Texts in Johnson's Dictionary,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 212–27.
  1612. Allen Reddick, “Johnson and Richardson,” in The Oxford History of English Lexicography, ed. A. P. Cowie, 2 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2009), 1:154–81.
    A careful account of Johnson's Dictionary and Charles Richardson's New Dictionary of the English Language, which “provocatively illuminates aspects of Johnson's works.” Includes illustrations.
  1613. Bruce Redford, The Converse of the Pen: Acts of Intimacy in the Eighteenth-Century Familiar Letter (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1986), chapter 6 (“Samuel Johnson and Mrs. Thrale: The ‘Little Language’ of the Public Moralist,” pp. 206–43).
  1614. Bruce Redford, “Defying Our Master: The Appropriation of Milton in Johnson's Political Tracts,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 20 (1990): 81–91.
  1615. Bruce Redford, “Hearing Epistolick Voices: Teaching Johnson's Letters,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 78–83.
  1616. Bruce Redford, “Johnson Ventriloquens,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1994): 1–12.
  1617. Bruce Redford, “Taming Savage Johnson,” Literary Imagination 1, no. 1 (1999): 85–101.
  1618. Bruce Redford, “James Boswell, The Life of Johnson,” in A Companion to Literature from Milton to Blake, ed. David Womersley (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), pp. 393–401.
  1619. Bruce Redford, “Talk into Text: The Shaping of Conversation in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in Eighteenth-Century Contexts: Historical Inquiries in Honor of Phillip Harth, ed. Howard D. Weinbrot, Peter J. Schakel, and Stephen E. Karian (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 2001), pp. 247–64.
  1620. Bruce Redford, Designing the “Life of Johnson”: The Lyell Lectures, 2001–2 (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2002). Pp. xv + 181. Reviews:
  1621. Corin Redgrave, “My Season with Sam,” The Independent, 11 Sept. 2003. The actor describes his role as Johnson in Maureen Lawrence's Resurrection in Lichfield. Reprinted in Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 6–8.
  1622. Christine Rees, “Johnson's Milton: The Writer-Hero in The Rambler,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 17–23.
  1623. Christine Rees, “Johnson Reads Areopagitica,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 1–21.
    On Johnson's interest in Milton's prose and political censorship.
  1624. Christine Rees, “‘Pray Lend Me Topsel on Animals’: The Place of Animals in Johnson's Life and Interests,” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 57–66.
  1625. Christine Rees, Johnson's Milton (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2010). Pp. xiii + 296.
  1626. William Rees-Mogg, “He Gave Us Johnson: Thanks to Boswell, We Can Still Live in the 18th Century — And Emulate Its Style,” The Times, 18 May 1995, p. 20.
  1627. James E. Reibman, “Dr. Johnson and the Law: An Enlightenment View,” The New Rambler C:26 (1985–86), 9–11.
  1628. Jerome M. Reich, M.D., “Convulsion of the Lung: An Historical Analysis of the Cause of Dr. Johnson's Fatal Emphysema,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 159–74.
    A thorough consideration of the evidence regarding Johnson's pulmonological health.
  1629. Bryan Reid “The Johnson Society of Australia: Convivial Tercentenary Dinner,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 28.
    A brief account of the society's dinner on 15 May 2009
  1630. Hugh Reid, “‘The Want of a Closer Union . . .’: The Friendship of Samuel Johnson and Joseph Warton,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 133–43.
  1631. Karen Faith Reifel, “The Work of Believing: Labor as Self-Definition in Carlyle, Dickens, and Brontë,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 6 (Dec. 1990): 2028A. Not seen.
  1632. Thomas Jeffrey Reinert, “Regulating Confusion: Johnson and the Crowd,” Dissertation Abstracts International 48, no. 9 (March 1988): 2346A. Not seen.
  1633. Thomas Reinert, “Johnson and Conjecture,” SEL 28, no. 3 (Summer 1988): 483–96.
  1634. Thomas Reinert, Regulating Confusion: Johnson and the Crowd (Durham: Duke Univ. Press, 1996). Reviews:
  1635. Earl A. Reitan, “Samuel Johnson, the Gentleman's Magazine, and the War of Jenkins' Ear,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 19 (2009): 1–8.
    Reitan attributes a note in GM on the War of Jenkins' Ear to Johnson.
  1636. Joshua Reynolds, “Art-Connoisseurs,” Art & Antiques 17, no. 6 (June 1994): 89–92. Letter from Reynolds in response to Idler 25 on art connoisseurs.
  1637. R. C. Reynolds, “Johnson on Fielding,” College Literature 13, no. 2 (Spring 1986): 157–67.
  1638. Geoffrey Ribbans, “A Note on Cadalso and Samuel Johnson,” Bulletin of Hispanic Studies 68, no. 1 (Jan. 1991): 47–51.
  1639. Jessica Richard, “‘I Am Equally Weary of Confinement’: Women Writers and Rasselas from Dinarbas to Jane Eyre,” Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature 22, no. 2 (Fall 2003): 335–56.
  1640. Robert Richardson, “Media Types: Hero in the Image of Dr. Johnson,” The Independent, 28 April 1993, p. 19.
  1641. John Richetti, “Ideas and Voices: The New Novel in Eighteenth-Century England,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 12, nos. 2–3 (2000): 327–44.
  1642. John Richetti, “Johnson's Assertions and Concessions: Moral Irresolution and Rhetorical Performance,” in Samuel Johnson: The Arc of the Pendulum, ed. Freya Johnston and Lynda Mugglestone (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 37–48.
  1643. Christopher Ricks, “Dr. Johnson and the Falkland Islands,” The New Rambler C:26 (1985–86), 13–15.
  1644. Christopher Ricks, “Samuel Johnson: Dead Metaphors and ‘Impending Death,’” in The Force of Poetry (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1987), pp. 80–88.
  1645. Arthur G. Rippey, The Story of a Library: Reminiscences of a Latter Day Book Collector (Denver: Smith & Smith, 1985). Not seen.
  1646. Daniel E. Ritchie, “Samuel Johnson's The Rambler and Edmund Burke's Reflections,” Modern Age: A Quarterly Review 34, no. 4 (Summer 1992): 344–48.
  1647. Daniel E. Ritchie, Reconstructing Literature in an Ideological Age: A Biblical Poetics and Literary Studies from Milton to Burke (Grand Rapids: William B. Erdmans, 1996): chapter 2 (“Johnson Reading Literature, Johnson Reading the Canon of Scripture: The Difference between Literary Pleasure and Religious Happiness”), pp. 71–118.
  1648. Fiona Ritchie, “Exploring the Theatre History of the Eighteenth Century: My Experience of Curating an Exhibition on Johnson and the Theatre,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 35–41.
    On “Behind the Scenes: The Hidden Life of Georgian Theatre, 1737–1784,” an exhibition at Dr. Johnson's House, 16 April–18 Sept. 2007.
  1649. Stefka Ritchie, “Samuel Johnson in an Age of Science,” M.Phil. thesis, Univ. of Central England, 2002.
  1650. Stefka Ritchie, “In Awe of Nature: The Influence of Science in the Works of Samuel Johnson and Joseph Wright of Derby,” BMI Insight 5 (2003): 44–56.
  1651. Annie Rivara, “Savoir délirant et encyclopédie détraquée: Figures de savant fou dans le Prince Rasselas de Johnson et le Compère Mathieu de Du Laurens,” in (eds.), Folies romanesques au siècle des lumières, ed. René Démoris and Henri Lafon (Paris: Desjonquères, 1998), pp. 351–64.
  1652. Betty Rizzo, “‘Innocent Frauds’: By Samuel Johnson,” The Library: The Transactions of the Bibliographical Society 6th series, 8, no. 3 (Sept. 1986): 249–64.
  1653. Betty Rizzo, “Johnson's Efforts on Behalf of Authorship in The Rambler,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 264 (1989): 1188–90.
  1654. Betty Rizzo, “‘Downing Everybody’: Johnson and the Grevilles,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 17–46.
  1655. S. C. Roberts, An Eighteenth Century Gentlemen??? and Other Essays (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2010), pp. ???.
  1656. Duncan Robinson, “Giuseppe Baretti as ‘A Man of Great Humanity,’” in British Art 1740–1820: Essays in Honor of Robert R. Wark, ed. Guilland Sutherland (San Marino: Huntington Library, 1992), pp. 81–94.
  1657. Roger Robinson, “‘We All Love Beattie’: The Truthful Minstrel in the Johnson Circle,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 39–47.
  1658. J. P. W. Rogers, “Dr. Johnson and the English Eccentrics,” The New Rambler C:26 (1985–86), 5–7.
  1659. J. P. W. Rogers, “Samuel Johnson's Gout,” Medical History 30 (1986): 133–44.
  1660. J. P. W. Rogers, “Johnson's Lady Frances,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 41–43.
  1661. Katharine M. Rogers, “Anna Barbauld's Criticism of Fiction — Johnsonian Mode, Female Vision,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 21 (1991): 27–41.
  1662. Pat Rogers, “‘The Transit of the Caledonian Hemisphere’: Johnson, Boswell, and the Context of Exploration,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 328–48. Appears, with slight revisions, in Rogers's Johnson and Boswell: The Transit of Caledonia, chapter 3.
  1663. Pat Rogers, “Boswell and the Scotticism,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 56–71. Appears, with slight revisions, in Rogers's Johnson and Boswell: The Transit of Caledonia, chapter 7.
  1664. Pat Rogers, “The Noblest Savage of Them All: Johnson, Omai, and Other Primitives,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 281–301. Appears, with slight revisions, in Rogers's Johnson and Boswell: The Transit of Caledonia chapter 4.
  1665. Pat Rogers, “Johnson and the Art of Flying,” N&Q, 40, no. 3 (Sept. 1993): 329–30.
  1666. Pat Rogers, Johnson (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1993). Reviews:
  1667. Pat Rogers, ed., Johnson and Boswell in Scotland: A Journey to the Hebrides (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1993). Reviews:
  1668. Pat Rogers, Johnson and Boswell: The Transit of Caledonia (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995). Reviews:
  1669. Pat Rogers, The Samuel Johnson Encyclopedia (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1996). Pp. xxxi + 483.
    A wide-ranging reference work on Johnson's life, works, and associates.
    Reviews:
  1670. Pat Rogers, The Samuel Johnson Encyclopedia, tr. into Japanese by Daisuke Nagashima et al. (Tokyo: Yumani-shobo, 1999). Pp. 299. With an introductory essay by Nagashima on Johnson studies in Japan.
  1671. Pat Rogers, “Chatterton and the Club,” in Thomas Chatterton and Romantic Culture, ed. Nick Groom (New York: St. Martin's, 1999), pp. 121–50.
  1672. Pat Rogers, “The Johnson Club and Late Victorian Literary Culture,&Rdquo; Journal of Victorian Culture 18, no. 1 (March 2013): 115–33.
    On the role of the Club in the late nineteenth century, including a number of distinguished historians.
  1673. Carl E. Rollyson, “Samuel Johnson: Dean of Contemporary Biographers,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, 24, no. 2 (Spring 2001): 442–47.
  1674. Carl E. Rollyson, “Biography Theory and Method: The Case of Samuel Johnson,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 25, no. 2 (Spring 2002): 363–69.
  1675. Ronald Rompkey, “Soame Jenyns's ‘Epitaph on Dr. Samuel Johnson,’” Bodleian Library Record 12, no. 5 (Oct. 1987): 421–24.
  1676. Alan Roper, “Johnson, Dryden, and an Allusion to Horace,” Notes & Queries 53, no. 2 (June 2006): 198–99. Not seen.
  1677. Beth Carole Rosenberg, “The Dialogic Influence: Virginia Woolf and Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53, no. 3 (Sept. 1992): 821A. New York Univ. Not seen.
  1678. Beth Carole Rosenberg, Virginia Woolf and Samuel Johnson: Common Readers (New York: St. Martin's, 1995). Reviews:
  1679. Jordana Rosenberg, “Reading Lessons: Rasselas with The Matrix,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 13–17. On teaching Rasselas against the background of the movie.
  1680. Trevor Ross, The Making of the English Literary Canon: From the Middle Ages to the Late Eighteenth Century (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's Univ. Press, 1998): chapter 7 (“A Basis for Criticism”), pp. 247–91.
  1681. Loren Rothschild, Blinking Sam: The True History of Sir Joshua Reynolds's 1775 Portrait of Samuel Johnson (Tempe: privately printed for the Johnsonians, 2002). Pp. 15.
    An authoritative account of the famous Blinking Sam portrait. Reprinted in The Age of Johnson.
  1682. Loren Rothschild, “Blinking Sam: The True History of Sir Joshua Reynolds's 1775 Portrait of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 141–50.
    An authoritative account of the famous Blinking Sam portrait. Reprinted from the Johnsonians' keepsake.
  1683. Loren Rothschild, Samuel Johnson's “Dictionary”: A Lecture Presented at the Huntington Library May 27, 2009 on the Occasion of the Opening of the Exhibition “Samuel Johnson: Literary Giant of the Eighteenth Century” (Los Angeles: The Samuel Johnson Society of the West, 2009). Pp. 19.
    A keepsake of Rothschild's wide-ranging introduction to the Dictionary to mark the opening of the Huntington's exhibition in 2009.
  1684. Loren Rothschild, “Collecting Samuel Johnson and His Circle,” in Editing Lives, ed. Jesse G. Swan (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2014), pp. 1–8.
  1685. Adam Rounce, “Success and Failure in Grub-Street: Samuel Johnson and Percival Stockdale,” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 22–34.
  1686. Adam Rounce, “Toil and Envy: Unsuccessful Responses to Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 186–206.
    Not seen???
  1687. Adam Rounce, “Young, Goldsmith, Johnson, and the Idea of the Author in 1759,” in Reading 1759: Literary Culture in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and France (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2013), pp. 95–112.
  1688. Phyllis Rowell, Dr Johnson's House During the War, 1939–1945 (Salisbury: Salisbury Printing Co., 1987). Commemorates Johnson's 278th birthday at the annual dinner of the Johnsonians.
  1689. Niall Rudd, “Cicero's De Senectute and The Vanity of Human Wishes,” N&Q 33, no. 1 (March 1986): 59.
  1690. Niall Rudd, “Notes on Johnson's Latin Poetry,” Translation & Literature 9, no. 2 (2000): 215–23.
  1691. William Ruddick, “Scott and Samuel Johnson and Biographers of Dryden,” The New Rambler C:25 (1984): 14–26.
  1692. William Ruddick, “Samuel Johnson: Picturesque Tourist,” The New Rambler D:8 (1992–93), 24–26.
  1693. Franca Ruggieri, “Samuel Johnson e il suo tempo,” in L'età di Johnson: La letteratura inglese del secondo Settecento, ed. Franca Ruggieri (Rome: Carocci, 1998), pp. 41–70.
  1694. Franca Ruggieri, “James Boswell: Biografia come storia,” in L'età di Johnson: La letteratura inglese del secondo Settecento, ed. Franca Ruggieri (Rome: Carocci, 1998), pp. 71–80.
  1695. Valerie Rumbold, “Mrs Thrale Leaves Home: Closed Circles and Expanding Horizons in Hester Lynch Piozzi's Anecdotes of Dr Johnson,” The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 3–17.
  1696. Roseann Runte, “Voltaire and Johnson on Shakespeare,” Actes de langue française et de linguistique, 10/11 (1997–98), 33–40.
  1697. P. Russell, “A Hobbist Tory: Johnson on Hume,” Hume Studies 16, no. 1 (1990): 75–79.
  1698. T. M. Russell, “Architecture and the Lexicographers: Three Studies in Eighteenth-Century Publications, Pt. III: Samuel Johnson and A Dictionary of the English Language,” Edinburgh Architecture Research 22 (1995): 59–79.
  1699. Terence M. Russell, ed., The Encyclopaedic Dictionary in the Eighteenth Century: Architecture, Arts and Crafts vol. 4, Samuel Johnson: A Dictionary of the English Language (Brookfield, VT: Ashgate Press, 1997). Examines 700 Dictionary entries on architecture. Reviews:
  1700. Kalman G. Ruttkay, “The Aristotelian Heritage in Critical Theory and Practice: From Dryden to Johnson,” Neohelicon: Acta Comparationis Litterarum Universarum 17, no. 1 (1990): 13–25.
  1701. Paul T. Ruxin, “Beginnings of the Johnsonian News Letter,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 6–8.
  1702. Paul Ruxin, “Synonymy and Satire by Association,” The Caxtonian (May 2006): ???. Reprinted in Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 34–41.
    On Boswell's inscribed copy of John MacLaurin's Essays in Verse, including the poem “On Johnson's Dictionary” (reproduced here).
  1703. Mary R. Ryder, “Avoiding the ‘Many-Headed Monster’: Wesley and Johnson on Enthusiasm,” Methodist History 23, no. 4 (1985): 214–22.
  1704. E. A. Sadler, “Dr Johnson's Ashbourne Friends: Extracts from E. A. Sadler's 1939 Paper,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1997): 36–43.
  1705. Anni Sairio, “‘Sam of Streatham Park’: A Linguistic Study of Dr. Johnson's Membership in the Thrale Family,” European Journal of English Studies 9, no. 1 (April 2005): 21–35. Not seen.
  1706. Nobuyoshi Saito, “The Sense of a Middle: System and History in Samuel Johnson and Laurence Sterne,” Dissertation Abstracts International 55, no. 7 (Jan. 1995): 1971A. Brown University. Not seen.
  1707. Nobuyoshi Saito, “Reading and Teaching Rasselas in Kyoto,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 11–14.
  1708. Andrew Sandlin, “Samuel Johnson's ‘Late Conversion’ Re-evaluated in View of the Published Sermons,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 57–63.
  1709. Andrew Sandlin, “The Political Sermons of Samuel Johnson,” Modern Age 39, no. 4 (1997): 383–388.
  1710. Aaron Santesso, “Teaching Johnson to Teach Shakespeare,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 2 (Sept. 2006): 9–11
  1711. Aaron Santesso, “Johnson as Londoner,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 161–79.
    On Johnson's “central urban philosophy,” with comments on the city and the poem London. “Shakespeare . . . comes to represent to Johnson not only how even the greatest authors are transformed by the city, but also how urban transformation is not always entirely negative.”
  1712. Alan Saunders, “Doing Philosophy with Samuel Johnson: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 2006,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 10 (Aug. 2008): 11–22.
    Not seen.
  1713. Fernando Savater, “Boswel [sic], el curioso impertinente,” Suplemento Literario La Nacion, 14 Jan. 1996, p. 6. In Spanish.
  1714. Patrick Sawer, “Hodge Gets His Share of Dr Johnson's Fame,” The Evening Standard, 24 Sept. 1997, p. 15. On the statue of Hodge outside the Gough Square house.
  1715. J. T. Scanlan, “The Example of Edmond Malone: Boswell's Life of Johnson and Patterns of Scholarly and Legal Prose,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991) 115–35.
  1716. J. T. Scanlan, “Johnson and Pufendorf,” 1650–1850 8 (2003): 27–59.
  1717. J. T. Scanlan, “‘He Hates Much Trouble’: Johnson's Life of Swift and the Contours of Biographical Inheritance in Late Eighteenth-Century England,” in Representations of Swift, ed. Brian A. Connery (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2002), pp. 99–116.
  1718. J. T. Scanlan, “‘A Spirit of Contradiction’: Samuel Johnson and the Law,” The New Rambler E:6 (2002–3): 3–11.
  1719. J. T. Scanlan, “Johnson's Dictionary and Legal Dictionaries,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 87–106. Not seen. Reprinted in Ashgate Critical Essays on Early English Lexicographers, Volume 5: The Eighteenth Century, ed. Anne McDermott (Farnham: Ashgate; 2012), pp. 139–58.
  1720. J. T. Scanlan, “Samuel Johnson's Legal Thought,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 112–30.
    Not seen???
  1721. J. T. Scanlan “Johnson at Bucknell,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 31–33.
    An account of the tercentennial conference in Lewisburg, Penna., in March 2009.
  1722. Steven Donald Scherwatzky, “Johnson's Tory Politics,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 7 (Jan. 1991): 2388A. Rutgers University.
  1723. Steven Scherwatzky, “Review Essay: Samuel Johnson and Eighteenth-Century Politics,” Eighteenth-Century Life, 15, no. 3 (Nov. 1991): 113–24. Review of Donald Greene, The Politics of Samuel Johnson, 2nd ed.; Paul Kléber Monod, Jacobitism and the English People, 1688–1788; Isaac Kramnick, Republicanism and Bourgeois Radicalism: Political Ideology in Late Eighteenth-Century England and America; and John W. Derry, Politics in the Age of Fox, Pitt and Liverpool: Continuity and Transformation.
  1724. Steven Scherwatzky, “Johnson, Rasselas and the Politics of Empire,” Eighteenth-Century Life 16 (Nov. 1992): 103–13.
  1725. Steven D. Scherwatzky, “‘Complicated Virtue’: The Politics of Samuel Johnson's ‘Life of Savage,’” Eighteenth-Century Life 25, no. 3 (Fall 2001): 80–93.
  1726. Steven Scherwatzky, “Johnson and Politics: The Dangerous Prevalence of the Imagination,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 13 (2002): 53–67.
    Scherwatzky revisits Johnson's politics, working to go beyond the was-he-or-wasn't-he tone of the discussions of Jacobitism.
  1727. Steven D. Scherwatzky, “Samuel Johnson's Augustinianism Revisited,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 1–16.
    Johnson has often been called “Augustinian”; Scherwatzky provides the most thorough account of what this means.
  1728. Michele Eva-Marie Schiavone, “Heroism in Samuel Johnson's Periodical Essays,” Dissertation Abstracts International, 50, no. 8 (Feb. 1990): 2501–2A. Not seen.
  1729. Märi Schindele, “Précis of Articles on Johnson and Boswell,” Johnsonian News Letter 51, no. 4–52, no. 1 (1991–92), 24–28.
  1730. Michael Schmidt, Lives of the Poets (London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1998): “Dr Johnson,” pp. 334–41.
  1731. Roger Schmidt, “Caffeine and the Coming of the Enlightenment,” Raritan: A Quarterly Review 23, no. 1 (2003): 129–49. Not seen.
  1732. Gregory Scholtz, “Sola Fide? Samuel Johnson and the Augustinian Doctrine of Salvation,” Philological Quarterly 72, no. 2 (Spring 1993): 185–212.
  1733. Gregory F. Scholtz, “Anglicanism in the Age of Johnson: The Doctrine of Conditional Salvation,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 22, no. 2 (Winter 1989): 182–207.
  1734. Gregory F. Scholtz, “Samuel Johnson on Human Nature: Natural Depravity and the Doctrine of Original Sin,” Word & World 13, no. 2 (Spring 1993): 136.
  1735. Rudiger Schreyer, “Illustrations of Authority: Quotations in Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language (1755),” Lexicographica: International Annual for Lexicography 16 (2000): 58–103.
  1736. Helga Schwalm, “Identität und Lebensgeschichte: Fremdbiographisches Erzählen bei Samuel Johnson und James Boswell,” in Das 18. Jahrhundert, ed. Monika Fludernik, Ruth Nestvold, and Vera Alexander (Trier: Wissenschaftlicher, 1998), pp. 91–107. In German.
  1737. Jack Schwandt, “Re-Reading Taxation No Tyranny: Was the United States of America a Mistake?” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 263 (1989): 275–76.
  1738. Richard B. Schwartz, “Johnson's Voluntary Agents,” in Theory and Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Studies ed. Richard B. Schwartz (Carbondale: Southern Illinois Univ. Press, 1990), pp. 51–65.
  1739. Richard B. Schwartz, “Samuel Johnson: The Professional Writer as Critic,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 1–12.
  1740. Richard B. Schwartz, After the Death of Literature (Carbondale: Southern Illinois Univ. Press, 1997).
  1741. Alex Segal, “Conversation, Writings, and the Subversion of Economy: Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage,” The Critical Review 37 (1997): 81–95.
  1742. Raman Selden, “Deconstructing the Ramblers,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 269–82.
  1743. Percy Selwyn, “Johnson's Hebrides: Thoughts on a Dying Social Order,” Development and Change 10, no. 3 (1979), 345–61.
  1744. David Sexton, “Broken Oaths: David Sexton Reflects on Dr Johnson's Mastery of the Art of Making Resolutions,” The Independent, 31 Dec. 1990, p. 13.
  1745. D[avid] S[exton], “N.B.,” TLS, 30 March 1995, p. 14. Review of articles on masturbation in The Age of Johnson, vol. 6.
  1746. Terry I. Seymour, “Why Dr. Johnson Was the First Mr. Everyman,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 2 (Sept. 2006): 40–43.
  1747. Terry I. Seymour “The Paula Peyraud Collection: Samuel Johnson and Women Writers in Georgian Society,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 34–36.
    An account of the sale of the Peyraud Collection at Bloomsbury Auctions in May 2009.
  1748. Amiya Bhushan Sharma, “Dr. Johnson: An Economic Perspective,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Aberdeen, 1983. Not seen.
  1749. Amiya Bhushan Sharma, “Samuel Johnson and the Art of Social Comfort,” Indian Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 1, no. 2 (Winter 1986): 16–35. Not seen.
  1750. Amiya Bhushan Sharma, “The Fowkes and the Lawrences: Biographical Notes on Samuel Johnson's Friends in India,” Indian Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 1, no. 1 (Summer 1986): 29–35. Not seen.
  1751. Amiya Bhushan Sharma, “Samuel Johnson's Image of India,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 121–39.
    A consideration of Johnson's knowledge of, and opinions about, Indian culture.
  1752. Mahanand Sharma, “Dr. Johnson and Babu Shyam Sunder Dass as Lexicographers,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 75–84.
  1753. O. P. Sharma, “Samuel Johnson's Lung Disease,” Journal of Medical Biography 7, no. 3 (Aug. 1999): 171–74.
  1754. Susheel Kumar Sharma, “Samuel Johnson's Moral Views in Life of Milton,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 104–8.
  1755. T. R. Sharma, ed., Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986).
  1756. T. R. Sharma, “Dr. Johnson and Defeudalization of Literature,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 109–18.
  1757. Richard Sharp, “The Religious and Political Character of the Parish of St. Clement Danes,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 44–54.
  1758. Alan Shelston, “Johnson, Watts and Wesley,” New Rambler D:2 (1986–87), 4–5.
  1759. Israel Shenker, “A Samuel Johnson Celebration Recalls His Wit and Wisdom,” Smithsonian 15 (Dec. 1984): 60–68.
  1760. W. G. Shepherd, tr., “A Latin Poem by Samuel Johnson,” Agenda 26, no. 3 (Autumn 1988): 42–44.
  1761. Barrie Sheppard, “Johnson and the Cucumber,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2, no. 2 (1998): 9–14.
  1762. Barrie Sheppard, “Johnson, Adam Smith, and Peacock Brains,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 3 (1999): 15–25.
  1763. Barrie Sheppard, “Time — Now and Then, with Particular Reference to Johnson's Attitude to the Keeping of It,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 5 (2001): 21–26.
  1764. Barrie Sheppard, “John Law, Dr Johnson, and Money, Trade and Gambling,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 6 (2002): 30–35.
  1765. Arthur Sherbo, The Birth of Shakespeare Studies: Commentators from Rowe (1709) to Boswell-Malone (1821) (East Lansing: Colleagues Press, 1986). Reviews:
  1766. Arthur Sherbo, “Nil Nisi Bonum: Samuel Johnson in the Gentleman's Magazine 1785–1800,” College Literature 16, no. 2 (Spring 1989): 168–81.
  1767. Arthur Sherbo, “Johnson's Shakespeare: The Man in the Edition,” College Literature 17, no. 1 (1990): 53–65.
  1768. Arthur Sherbo, “Samuel Johnson, Shakespeare, Milton, Rowe, and Otway: Some Resurrected Notes,” N&Q 40, no. 3 (Sept. 1993): 330–31.
  1769. Arthur Sherbo, Samuel Johnson's Critical Opinions: A Reexamination (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1995). Reviews:
  1770. Arthur Sherbo, “More of Samuel Johnson's Critical Opinions,” N&Q 45, no. 4 (Dec. 1998): 474–75.
  1771. Arthur Sherbo, Studies in the Johnson Circle (West Cornwall, Conn.: Locust Hill Press, 1998). Reviews:
  1772. Arthur Sherbo, “Thomas Holt-White on Johnson's Lives of Prior and Milton,” ANQ 13, no. 3 (2000): 24–27.
  1773. Arthur Sherbo, “Four Scraps of Johnsoniana,” Notes & Queries 51, no. 1 (March 2004): 59–60.
  1774. Arthur Sherbo, “From the Sale Catalogue of the Library of James Boswell, the Younger (1778–1822): Did Boswell Play the Pianoforte?,” Notes & Queries 51, no. 1 (March 2004): 60–63.
  1775. Arthur Sherbo, “More Johnsoniana from The Gentleman's Magazine,” Notes & Queries 52, no. 3 (Sept. 2005): 376–66.
  1776. Stuart Sherman, “Wollstonecraft and Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 51, no. 4–52, no. 1 (Dec. 1991-March 1992): 11–15.
  1777. Stuart Sherman, Telling Time: Clocks, Diaries, and English Diurnal Form, 1660–1785 (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1996), chapter 6 (“Diurnal Dialectic in the Western Islands”), pp. 185–222.
  1778. Stuart Sherman, “Samuel Johnson,” in Teaching British Literature: A Companion to “The Longman Anthology of British Literature,” 2nd ed., ed. David Damrosch et al. (New York: Longman, 2003), pp. 251–61.
  1779. Shigeru Shibagaki, “The Samuel Johnson Club of Japan,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 30–33.
    A short update on the activities of the Japanese society, with summaries of two lectures, Zenji Inamura's “Johnson's Views on Biography” and Marlies Danziger's “James Boswell in Tokyo.”
  1780. Daniel Dale Shilling, “Rhetorical Strategy in Samuel Johnson's ‘Rambler’ Essays,” Dissertation Abstracts International 49, no. 4 (Oct. 1988): 829–30A. Not seen.
  1781. William R. Siebenschuh, “Samuel Johnson's Special Appeal in the Seventies and Eighties,” CEA Critic: An Official Journal of the College English Association 49, no. 2–4 (Winter 1986–Summer 1987): 50–59.
  1782. William R. Siebenschuh, “Dr. Johnson and Hodge the Cat: Small Moments and Great Pleasures in the Life,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 388–99.
  1783. William R. Siebenschuh, “Johnson's Lives and Modern Students,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 133–51.
  1784. William R. Siebenschuh, “Cognitive Processes and Autobiographical Acts,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 12, no. 2 (Spring 1989): 142–53.
  1785. Penny Silva, “Johnson and the OED,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 231–42.
  1786. Bruce Silver, “Boswell on Johnson's Refutation of Berkeley: Revisiting the Stone,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 54, no. 3 (July 1993): 437–48.
  1787. Irène Simon, “Poets, Lexicographers, and Critics,” Cahiers de l'Institut de linguistique de Louvain 17, no. 1–3 (1991): 163–79.
  1788. John Simpson, “What Johnson Means to Me,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 1 (March 2005): 6–7.
  1789. Brijraj Singh, “‘Only Half of His Subject’: Johnson's The False Alarm and the Wilkesite Movement,” Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 42, nos. 1–2 (1988): 45–60. Reprinted in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 47–66.
  1790. John P. Sisk, “Doctor Johnson Kicks a Stone,” Philosophy and Literature 10, no. 1 (April 1986): 65–75.
  1791. Adam Sisman, Boswell's Presumptuous Task (London: Hamish Hamilton, 2000). Reviews:
  1792. Yvonne Skargon, Lily & Hodge & Dr. Johnson (Swavesey, Cambridge: Silent Books, 1991). Wood engravings by Yvonne Skargon, with text by Samuel Johnson. Reviews:
  1793. Stephen Robert Slimp, “Samuel Johnson's Christian Humanist Poetry,” Dissertation Abstracts International 57, no. 2 (Aug. 1996): 698A. Not seen.
  1794. Stephen Slimp, “A Poet's Apprenticeship: Samuel Johnson's School Translations,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 109–32.
  1795. Michelle Slung, “At Home with Dr. Johnson,” Victoria, 13, no. 3 (March 1999): 120–21. On Johnson's Gough Square house.
  1796. Ian C. Small, “Yeats and Johnson on the Limitations of Patriotic Art,” Studies (Ireland), 63, no. 252 (1974), 379–88.
  1797. P. J. Smallwood, ed., “Sir, Said Dr. Johnson”: The Johnson Quotation Book, Based on the Collection of Chartres Byron (Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1989).
  1798. Philip Smallwood, “Johnson's Critical Humanism,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 41–50.
  1799. Philip Smallwood, “Shakespeare: Johnson's Poet of Nature,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 143–60.
  1800. Philip Smallwood, ed., Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After (Lewisburg: Buckness Univ. Press, 2001). Pp. 179. Reviews:
  1801. Philip Smallwood, “Ironies of the Critical Past: Historicizing Johnson's Criticism,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 114–33.
  1802. Philip Smallwood, “The Johnsonian Monster and the Lives of the Poets: James Gillray, Critical History and the Eighteenth-Century Satirical Cartoon,” The British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 25, no. 2 (Autumn 2002): 217–45.
  1803. Philip Smallwood, “Johnson's Criticism and the Passage of Theory,” The New Rambler E:7 (2003–4): 3–11.
  1804. Philip Smallwood, Johnson's Critical Presence: Image, History, Judgment (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004). Pp. xvii + 172. Reviews:
  1805. Philip Smallwood, “Johnson's Criticism, the Arts, and the Idea of Art,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 163–85.
    Not seen???
  1806. Philips Smallwood, Critical Occasions: Dryden, Pope, Johnson, and the History of Criticism (New York: AMS Press, 2011), pp. ???.
  1807. Christopher Shawn Smith, “‘The Prophecy of Autumn’: Hawthorne's Augustan Sensibility,” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 7 (Jan. 2002): 2428A. Univ. of Dallas. Not seen.
  1808. Duane H. Smith, “Repetitive Patterns in Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” SEL 36, no. 3 (Summer 1996): 623–40.
  1809. Frederik N. Smith, “‘Pituitous Defluxion’: Samuel Johnson and Beckett's Philosophic Vocabulary,” Romance Studies, 11 (Winter 1987): 86–95.
  1810. Frederik N. Smith, “Johnson, Beckett, and ‘The Choice of Life,’” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 187–200.
    A pioneering account of Samuel Beckett's interest in Johnson's life and works.
  1811. Frederik N. Smith, “‘My Johnson Fantasy,’” chap. 6 of Beckett's Eighteenth Century (Houndmills: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 110–31. Reviews:
  1812. J. F. Smith, “Boswell in Search of Boswell: A Quest for Self-Definition,” Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association 5 (1986): 188–96.
  1813. Joseph H. Smith, “Samuel Johnson and Stories of Childhood,” Thought 61 (March 1986): 105–17.
  1814. Ken Edward Smith, “Johnson as Storyteller,” The New Rambler D:4 (1988–89), 14–27.
  1815. K. E. Smith, “Johnson and Fanny Burney,” The New Rambler D:7 (1991–92), 3–4.
  1816. K. E. Smith, “Despair and its Antidotes in Cowper and Johnson,” The New Rambler E:1 (1997–98), 33–40.
  1817. M. van Wyk Smith, “Father Lobo, Ethiopia, and the Transkei: or, Why Rasselas Was Not a Mpondo Prince,” Journal of African Travel Writing 4 (1998): 5–16.
  1818. Nicholas Smith, “Jacopo Sannazaro's Eclogae piscatoriae (1526) and the ‘Pastoral Debate’ in Eighteenth-Century England,” Studies in Philology 99, no. 4 (2002): 432–50. Not seen.
  1819. Jennifer Ellis Snead, “‘Poet’ as Patchwork: Johnson's Lives of the English Poets,” chapter 3 of “‘Men of Print’: Pope, Young, Johnson and the Augustan ‘Man of Letters,’” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 10 (April 2002): 3406A. Duke University. Not seen.
  1820. Jennifer Snead, “Disjecta Membra Poetae: The Aesthetics of the Fragment and Johnson's Biographical Practice in the Lives of the English Poets,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 37–56.
  1821. Jennifer Snead, “The Mind in Motion,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 48, no. 2 (Summer 2007): 173–79.
    On SJ's biographical practice in the Lives, and his attention to the “minute details of daily life” described in Rambler 60. Snead draws on Kirkley's Biographer and Work.
  1822. Cheryl Rae Snell, “The Religious Design of Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” M.A. Thesis, Central Washington University, 1988. Not seen.
  1823. Daniel Arnold Solberg, “The Ladies and the Lion: The Bluestockings and Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 56, no. 4 (Oct. 1995): 1373A. University of South Florida. Not seen.
  1824. Soliman Y. Soliman, “Rasselas: Certain Aspects of Technique,” Journal of Education and Science (Univ. of Mosul, Iraq), 3 (1981), 5–15.
  1825. Harry M. Solomon, “Johnson's Silencing of Pope: Trivializing An Essay on Man,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 247–80.
  1826. Stanley J. Solomon, “Parting from Dr. Johnson,” Profession 2002 130–39.
  1827. Mary Katherine Soltman, “Critical Responses to Samuel Johnson's Attack on John Milton's ‘Lycidas,’” M.A. Thesis, Central Washington University, 1988. Not seen.
  1828. Nancy Caldwell Sorel, “First Encounters,” The Atlantic March 1993, p. 271.
  1829. Nancy Caldwell Sorel, “When John Wilkes Met Dr. Samuel Johnson,” The Independent, 6 July 1996, p. 45.
  1830. Theresa Anne Sorel, “Boswell and Johnson's Highland Tour,” chapter 3 of “Scottish Cultural Nationalism, 1760–1832: The Highlandization of Scottish National Identity,” M.A. thesis, Univ. of Guelph. Not seen.
  1831. David R. Sorensen, “Carlyle, Boswell's Life of Johnson and the ‘Conversation’ of History,” Prose Studies 16, no. 2 (1993): 27–40.
  1832. Janet Sorensen, “Dr. Johnson Eats His Words: Figuring the Incorporating Body of English Print Culture,” Language Sciences 22, no. 3 (July 2000:, 295–314.
  1833. Janet Sorensen, The Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth-Century British Writing (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2000), chapter 2 (“‘A Grammarian's Regard to the Genius of Our Tongue’: Johnson's Dictionary Imperial Grammar, and the Customary National Language”), pp. 63–103.
  1834. Serge Soupel, “‘The True Culprit Is the Mind Which Can Never Run Away from Itself’: Samuel Johnson and Depression,“ Studies in the Literary Imagination 44, no. 1 (Spring 2011): 43–62.
  1835. Patricia Meyer Spacks, “The Subtle Sophistry of Desire: Dr. Johnson and The Female Quixote,” Modern Philology, 85, no. 4 (May 1988): 532–42.
  1836. Patricia Meyer Spacks, Boredom: the Literary History of a State of Mind (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1995), chapter 2 (“Vacuity, Satiety, and the Active Life: Eighteenth-Century Men”), pp. 31–59.
  1837. Patricia Meyer Spacks, “Reading Dr. Johnson: A Confession,” in Under Criticism: Essays for William H. Pritchard ed. David Sofield and Herbert Tucker (Athens: Ohio Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 167–81.
  1838. Monroe K. Spears, “William James as Culture Hero,” Hudson Review 39 (1986): 15–32.
  1839. Robert D. Spector, Samuel Johnson and the Essay (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1997). Reviews:
  1840. M. P. Spens, “Samuel Johnson and Jacobitism: A Response to Donald Greene,” TLS, 8 Sept. 1995, p. 17.
  1841. Basil Stafford, “Johnson and Painting,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 9 (Aug. 2007): 63–76.
    Not seen.
  1842. Fiona Stafford, “Dr Johnson and the Ruffian: New Evidence in the Dispute between Samuel Johnson and James Macpherson,” N&Q 36, no. 1 (March 1989): 70–77.
  1843. Jack Stark, “Learning from Samuel Johnson about Drafting Statutes,” Statute Law Review 23, no. 3 (2002): 227–33.
  1844. William W. Starr, Whisky, Kilts, and the Loch Ness MOnster: Traveling through Scotland with Boswell and JOhnson (Columbia: Univ. of South Carolina Press, 2011). Pp. viii + 223.
  1845. Ilan Stavans, “What Johnson Means to Me: Dr. Johnson and I,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 7–9.
  1846. Aaron Stavisky, “Johnson and the Noble Savage, Friend of Goodness,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 165–204.
  1847. Aaron Stavisky, “Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’ Reconsidered Once More,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 1–24.
  1848. Aaron Stavisky, “Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’: A Response to Bundock,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 187–203.
  1849. Aaron Stavisky, “Samuel Johnson and the Market Economy,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 13 (2002): 69–101.
    A survey of Johnson's interest in economics.
  1850. Aaron Stavisky, “Johnson's Poverty: The Uses of Adversity,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 131–43.
  1851. Peter Steele, Flights of the Mind: Johnson and Dante (Melbourne: Privately printed for the Johnson Society of Australia, 1997). The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 1996.
  1852. Jane Steen, “Literally Orthodox: Dr. Johnson's Anglicanism,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 303 (1992): 449–52.
  1853. J. E. Steen, “Samuel Johnson and Aspects of Anglicanism,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cambridge, 1992. Not seen.
  1854. Gabriele Stein, “Word-Formation in Dr. Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language,” Dictionaries, 6 (1985): 66–112.
  1855. Jonathan Steinberg, “Samuel Johnson, the ‘Harmless Drudge,’” lecture 6 of European History and European Lives, 1715–1914, 18 CDs (Chantilly, Va.: Teaching Co., 2003).
    Not seen.
  1856. Tiffany Stern, “‘I Do Wish that You Had Mentioned Garrick’: The Absence of Garrick in Johnson's Shakespeare,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 71–96.
    “Garrick is not merely ‘forgotten’ in Johnson's Shakespeare; Garrick, and the need not to mention his performances or use his books, determines the content and layout of the Shakespeare text and notes. Thus Johnson's Shakespeare is shaped by the absence of David Garrick.”
  1857. John Allen Stevenson, “Savage Matters,” chapter 2 of The Real History of Tom Jones (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 47–75.
  1858. Charlotte A. Stewart, “The Life of a Johnson Collection,” American Book Collector 7, no. 6 (June 1986): 9–17. On Arthur G. Rippey's collection at MacMaster University.
  1859. Charlotte A. Stewart, “Johnson and Boswell: The Rippey Collection at McMaster,” Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 69, no. 2 (1987): 320–23.
  1860. Keith Stewart, “Samuel Johnson and the Ocean of Life: Variations on a Commonplace,” Papers on Language & Literature 23, no. 3 (Summer 1987): 305–17.
  1861. Maaja A. Stewart, “Nabokov's Pale Fire and Boswell's Johnson,” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 30, no. 2 (Summer 1988): 230–45.
  1862. Mary Margaret Stewart, “William Collins, Samuel Johnson, and the Use of Biographical Details,” SEL 28, no. 3 (Summer 1988): 471–82.
  1863. Clare Steyn, director, “Bozzy, Mistress and the Bear.” Distributed on videocassette by Television Service, Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Not seen. Reviews:
  1864. R. D. Stock, “Johnson Ecclesiastes,” Christianity and Literature 34, no. 4 (Summer 1985): 15–24.
  1865. R. D. Stock, “Samuel Johnson and the Snares of Poverty,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 21–36.
  1866. Percival Stockdale, Percival Stockdale: Samuel Johnson and His Disgrace to English Literature, ed. Howard Weinbrot (Iowa City: Windhover Press, 1988).
  1867. David Stoker, “Robert Potter's Attack on Doctor Johnson,” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 16, no. 2 (Fall 1993): 77–83.
  1868. Roy Bishop Stokes, “Diminutive Observations”: The Book-World of Dr. Johnson: Being the 1984 Garnett Sedgewick Memorial Lecture, Delivered on 24 October in the Recital Hall of the Music Building at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver: Dept. of English, University of British Columbia, 1985).
  1869. John Stone, “The Common-Law Model for Standard English in Johnson's Dictionary,” M.A. Thesis, McGill University, 1995. Not seen.
  1870. John Stone, “Seventeenth-Century Jurisprudence and Eighteenth-Century Lexicography: Sources for Johnson's Notion of Authority,” SEDERI 7 (1996): 79–92.
  1871. John Stone, “John Cowell's Interpreter: Legal Tradition and Lexicographical Innovation,” SEDERI 10 (1999): 121–29.
  1872. John Stone, “Law and the Politics of Johnson's Dictionary,” The European English Messenger 12, no. 1 (2003): 54–58.
  1873. John Stone, “The Law, the Alphabet, and Samuel Johnson,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 147–59.
  1874. John Stone, “On the Trail of Early Rambler and Idler Translations in France and Spain,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 34–41.
  1875. Jeff Strabone, “Samuel Johnson: Standardizer of English, Preserver of Gaelic,” ELH 77, no. 1 (Spring 2010): 237&nash;65.
    Strabone contrasts Johnson's positive views of Scottish Gaelic with his distaste for the “impure” Scots English.
  1876. Albrecht B. Strauss, “Thomas Wolfe and Samuel Johnson: An Unlikely Pair,” Southern Literary Journal 31, no. 2 (Spring 1999): 1–11.
  1877. Peter Strickland, “Samuel Johnson the Poet,” The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 46–51.
  1878. Michael Charles Stuprich, “Residual Grandeur: Samuel Johnson's Development as Biographer,” Dissertation Abstracts International 47, no. 11 (May 1987): 4091A. Not seen.
  1879. Michael Stuprich, “Johnson and Biography: Recent Critical Directions,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 152–166.
  1880. Michael Suarez, S.J., “Johnson's Christian Thought,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 192–208.
  1881. Michael F. Suarez, S.J., Malone contra Hawkins: A Keepsake to Mark the 292nd Birthday of Samuel Johnson & the 55th Annual Dinner of The Johnsonians (New Haven: privately printed for The Johnsonians by the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, 2001). Pp. 16.
  1882. Michael F. Suarez, S.J., “‘The Odious, Canting, Worthless Author of This Book’: Edmond Malone's Annotations to Sir John Hawkins' Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1787),” Yale University Library Gazette 77 (Oct. 2002): 22–38. Not seen.
  1883. Rajani Sudan, “Foreign Bodies: Contracting Identity in Johnson's London and the Life of Savage,” Criticism 34 (Spring 1992): 173–92.
  1884. Rajani Sudan, “Lost in Lexicography: Legitimating Cultural Identity in Johnson's Preface to the Dictionary,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 39, no. 2 (Summer 1998): 127–46.
  1885. Rajani Sudan, “Institutionalizing Xenophobia: Johnson's Project,” chapter 1 of Fair Exotics: Xenophobic Subjects in English Literature, 1720–1850 (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), pp. 24–64.
  1886. John Sunderland, “Samuel Johnson and History Painting,” in The Virtuoso Tribe of Arts and Sciences: Studies in the Eighteenth-Century Work and Membership of the London Society of Arts, ed. D. G. C. Allan and John L. Abbott (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1992), pp. 183–94.
  1887. S. A. Sushko, “Semiuel Dzhonson kak moralist,” Voprosy filosofii (1985 no. 9), 129–36. In Russian.
  1888. S. A. Sushko, “Samuel Johnson as Moralist,” Soviet Studies in Philosophy 25, no. 1 (1986): 87–104. Translation of “Semiuel Dzhonson kak moralist.”
  1889. Ray Sutton, “The Lichfield Two and a Man from Stratford,” BMInsight 1 (2000). Not seen.
  1890. Hitoshi Suwabe, “A Trio in the Age of Transition: Johnson, Boswell, and Hume,” Indian Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 1, no. 2 (Winter 1986): 8–15. Not seen.
  1891. Hitoshi Suwabe, “Boswell's Meetings with Johnson, A New Count,” in Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters, ed. Irma S. Lustig (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995), pp. 246–57.
  1892. Algernon Charles Swinburne, The Character and Opinions of Dr. Johnson: A Unique Wiseian Assemblage of Swinburne Materials Later Separated at the British Museum and Now Reconstructed by William B. Todd for the Annual Dinner of the Johnsonians to Commemorate Johnson's Two-Hundred and Seventy Sixth Birthday (New York: Privately printed for the Johnsonians, 1985). 250 copies of a facsimile of the 1918 edition [item 10/6:167] and the author's MS printed 20 Sept. 1985.
  1893. Stephen Robert Swords, “Emerson and the Ghost of Dr. Johnson: Heritage, Reading, and an American Life of Letters,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 1 (July 1991): 164–65A. University of Colorado, Boulder. Not seen.
  1894. Stephen Swords, “Emerson and the Ghost of Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 99–130.
    On Ralph Waldo Emerson's interest in, and knowledge about, Johnson, with othe reflections on American Transcendentalism.
  1895. Rajeev Syal, “Dr Johnson's Black Servant ‘Proved to Be My Ancestor,’” Sunday Telegraph (London), 18 April 1999, p. 21. On Dennis Barber, a descendant of Francis Barber.
  1896. Rajeev Syal, “Dr Johnson's House Needs Urgent Repairs,” Sunday Telegraph, 10 December 2000, p. 11.
  1897. John Talbot, “Johnson's Classical Mottoes,” Essays in Criticism 53, no. 4 (2003): 323–44.
  1898. Sudip Talukdar, “Dr. Johnson's Extraordinary Venture: The Dictionary,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 51–57.
  1899. Paul Tankard, “Reading The Rambler: Johnson's Engagement with the Anxieties of Authorship,” M.A. Thesis, Monash University, 1994.
  1900. Paul Tankard, “Maecenas and the Ministry: Johnson and His Publishers, Patrons and the Public,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 1 (1997): 1–9.
  1901. Paul Tankard, “A Petty Writer: Johnson and the Rambler Pamphlets,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 67–87.
  1902. Paul Tankard, “The Moral Writer and the Struggle with Selfhood: Lewis's ‘Screwtape’ and Johnson's ‘Mr. Rambler,’” in The Fantastic Self: Essays on the Subject of the Self, ed. Janeen Webb and Andrew Enstice (West Perth, W. Aust.: Eidolon, 1999), pp. 206–13.
  1903. Paul Tankard, “A Clergyman's Reading: Books Recommended by Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 11 (2000): 125–43.
    An extensively annotated list of books Johnson recommended to a young clergyman.
  1904. Paul Tankard, “The Rambler's Second Audience: Johnson and the Paratextual ‘Part of Literature,’” Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Bulletin 24, no. 4 (2000): 239–56.
  1905. Paul Tankard, “‘That Great Literary Projector’: Samuel Johnson's Designs or Catalogue of Projected Works,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 13 (2002): 103–80.
    An important survey of works Johnson planned but never wrote.
  1906. Paul Tankard, “The Great Cham and the English Aristophanes: Samuel Johnson and Foote,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 6 (2002): 7–13.
  1907. Paul Tankard, “Contexts for Johnson's Dictionary,” Genre 35, no. 2 (Summer 2003): 253–82.
  1908. Paul Tankard, “The ‘Great Cham’ and the ‘English Aristophanes’: Samuel Johnson, Samuel Foote, and Harmless Pleasure,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 83–96.
  1909. Paul Tankard, “Johnson and the Hot Potato: Scholarship and the ‘Science of Fables,’” in New Windows on a Woman's World: Essays for Jocelyn Harris 2 vols. ed. Colin Gibson and Lisa Marr (Dunedin, N.Z.: Dept. of English, University of Otago, 2005): I, 336–50.
  1910. Paul Tankard, “Samuel Johnson's History of Memory,” Studies in Philology 102, no. 1 (Winter 2005): 110–42.
  1911. Paul Tankard, “Johnsoniana: Johnson at Baretti's Trial,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 15–18.
    Includes SJ's testimony at the trial from the records of the Old Bailey.
  1912. Paul Tankard, “Johnson and the Walkable City,” Eighteenth-Century Life 32, no. 1 (Winter 2007): 1–22.
    “Johnson sees himself fundamentally as a walker, and walking is deeply implicated in his sense of the city. . . . Johnson sees and is disturbed by the growing size of the metropolis. . . . Johnson presents and models walking as the exemplary means of negotiating urban topographies, and he regards the urban street not as a conduit but a location. Walking is a means by which to connect with nature, society, and the body.”
  1913. Paul Tankard, “George Psalmanazar: The Fabulous Formosan,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 10 (Aug. 2008): 39–53
    Includes a section on Johnson. Not seen.
  1914. Paul Tankard, ed., Samuel Johnson's “Designs”: A Facsimile of the Manuscript, with a New Transcription & an Introductory Essay by Paul Tankard: With Newly Discovered Text (privately printed by Ron Gordon at the Oliphant Press for the Johnsonians, 2008).
    An attractive facsimile, printed in an edition of 225 copies, with facsimiles, transcriptions, and commentary, of the MS of Johnson's “Designs” for works he hoped to write.
  1915. Paul Tankard, “Johnson and Browne on Living Rich,” Notes and Queries 58, no. 256 (Sept. 2011): 422–23.
  1916. Paul Tankard, “Reference Point: Samuel Johnson and the Encyclopedias,” Eighteenth-Century Life 33, no. 3 (Fall 2009): 37–64.
    Tankard traces the evolution of Johnson's reputation in 121 entries from five eighteenth-century encyclopedias that cite him as an authority, providing new angles on Johnson's contemporary reputation.
  1917. Charlotte Taylor, “Random Thoughts on Rasselas,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 22–24.
  1918. Donald S. Taylor, “Johnson on the Metaphysicals: An Analytic Efficacy of Hostile Presuppositions,” Eighteenth-Century Life 10, no. 3 (Oct. 1986): 186–203.
  1919. Mark J. Temmer, Samuel Johnson and Three Infidels: Rousseau, Voltaire, Diderot (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1988). Reviews:
  1920. Kathryn Temple, “Johnson and Macpherson: Cultural Authority and the Construction of Literary Property,” Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 5 (1993): 355–87.
  1921. Kathryn Temple, “Ossian's Embrace: Johnson, Macpherson, and the Public Domain,” chapter 2 of Scandal Nation: Law and Authorship in Britain, 1750–1832 (Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press, 2003), pp. 73–120.
  1922. Richard Terry, “‘The Sound Must Seem an Eccho to the Sense’: An Eighteenth-Century Controversy Revisited,” Modern Language Review 94, no. 4 (Oct. 1999): 940–54.
  1923. Richard Terry, “Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” chapter 7 of Poetry and the Making of the English Literary Past, 1660–1781 (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 216–51.
  1924. Charles Thomas, Johnson in Love (unpublished play). Reviews:
  1925. Claudia Thomas, “‘Th' Instructive Moral, and Important Thought’: Elizabeth Carter Reads Pope, Johnson, and Epictetus,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 137–69.
  1926. Claudia Thomas, “Samuel Johnson and Elizabeth Carter: Pudding, Epictetus, and the Accomplished Woman,” South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 18–30.
  1927. Donald Thomas, “Samuel Johnson's Arabia,” Journal of English (Yemen), 15 (Sept. 1987): 1–14.
  1928. Spurgeon Thompson, “Writing the Fringe: Eighteenth-Century Accounts of the Western Islands of Scotland,” in Beyond the Floating Islands: An Anthology, ed. Stephanos Stephanides and Susan Bassnett (Bologna: Univ. of Bologna, 2002), pp. 106–14. Not seen.
  1929. Alice Thomson, “Arsonists Wreck Dr Johnson's Retreat,” The Times, 11 March 1991, p. 4. On the destruction of the Thrales' Streatham house.
  1930. Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade, “Dr. Johnson and the Auxiliary Do,” Hiroshima Studies in English Language and Literature 33 (1988): 22–39.
  1931. Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade, “Dr Johnson and the Auxiliary DO,” Folia Linguistica Historica 10, nos. 1–2 (1989): 145–62.
  1932. Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade and Randy Bax, “Of Dodsleys Projects and Linguistic Influence: The language of Johnson and Lowth,” Historical Sociolinguistics and Sociohistorical Linguistics 2, no. 2 (April 2002). On-line.
  1933. Thomas Tierney, “Samuel Johnson: Beast Fabulist and Satirist on Mankind,” Bestia 4 (May 1992): 55–65.
  1934. Adeline R. Tintner, “A Bibliographical Note: Henry James's Markings in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” The Henry James Review 20, no. 3 (1999): 291–98.
  1935. Nigel Tisdall, “Travel: There's Life in the Old Girl Yet: Lichfield's Most Famous Son Would Enjoy this Week's Festivities,” The Daily Telegraph, 13 July 1996, p. 22.
  1936. Brian Todd, “A Man Led by a Bear: Dr Johnson's Relationship with Boswell's Wife Margaret Montgomery,” The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 23–28.
  1937. Edward Tomarken, Johnson, “Rasselas,” and the Choice of Criticism (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1989). Reviews:
  1938. Edward Tomarken, “Perspectivism: The Methodological Implications of ‘The History of Imlac’ in Rasselas,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 262–90.
  1939. Edward Tomarken, Samuel Johnson on Shakespeare: The Discipline of Criticism (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1991). Reviews:
  1940. Edward Tomarken, A History of the Commentary on Selected Writings of Samuel Johnson (Columbia, S.C.: Camden House, 1994). Reviews:
  1941. Edward Tomarken, “The Method of Theory: Samuel Johnson and Critical Integrity,” Papers on Language & Literature, 32, no. 2 (Spring 1996): 217–23.
  1942. Neil Tomkinson, “Johnson's ‘Saintdom’ Continued,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1989–90), 81–82.
  1943. Neil Tomkinson, The Christian Faith and Practice of Samuel Johnson, Thomas De Quincey, and Thomas Love Peacock (Lewiston, N.Y.: E. Mellen Press, 1992): esp. Part I, pp. 1–149.
  1944. Thomas R. Trautmann, “Dr. Johnson and the Pandits: Imagining the Perfect Dictionary in Colonial Madras,” in Land, Politics, and Trade in South Asia, ed. Sanjay Subrahmanyam (New Delhi and New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2004), pp. ???.
    Not seen.
  1945. Michael Tree, “Johnson and the Anglican Tradition,” The New Rambler D:2 (1986–87), 6–15.
  1946. Manorama B. Trikha, “Christian Ethos in Johnson's The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 35–42.
  1947. Calvin Trillin, “Uncivil Liberties: Gout,” The Nation 234 (27 March 1982), 358. Humor column.
  1948. Jagannath Tripathi, “Dr. Samuel Johnson and Acharya Pt. Ram Chandra Skukla: The Epoch-Making Critics,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 58–62.
  1949. Katherine Maria Trumpener, “The Voice of the Past: Anxieties of Cultural Transmission in Post-Enlightenment Europe: Tradition, Folklore, Textuality, History,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 844A. Not seen.
  1950. Katie Trumpener, Bardic Nationalism: The Romantic Novel and the British Empire (Princeton: Princeton Univ. press, 1997), chapter 2 (“The End of an Auld Sang: Oral Tradition and Literary History”), pp. 67–127.
  1951. Lynne Truss, “Dr Johnson, We Presume,” The Times, 28 Oct. 1993, Features.
  1952. Gordon Turnbull, “‘Generous Attachment’: The Politics of Biography in the Tour to the Hebrides,” in Dr. Samuel Johnson and James Boswell, ed. Harold Bloom (New York: Chelsea, 1986), pp. 227–38.
  1953. Gordon Turnbull, “Yale Boswell Edition Notes,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 21–23.
  1954. Gordon Turnbull, “Yale Boswell Edition Notes,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 2 (Sept. 2006): 17–21.
  1955. Gordon Turnbull, “Yale Boswell Edition Notes,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 17–23.
    Miscellaneous notes. Includes a previously unknown letter from Thomas David Boswell to Robert Boswell, announcing James Boswell's death. Also a discussion of an article on Boswell's health by David M. Purdie and Neil Gow.
  1956. Gordon Turnbull “Yale Boswell Editions Notes,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 21–27.
    Miscellaneous notes. Includes comments on James Smithson and notices of several recent publications.
  1957. Gordon Turnbull, “Not a Woman in Sight: In His Last Years, Samuel Johnson Was Surrounded by Fractious, Quarelling Women: But Who Was at His Bedside When He Died?,” TLS 5568–69 (18 & 25 Dec. 2009): 19–21.
    A painstaking reconstruction of Johnson's deathbed scene, arguing (against most biographers) that “John Desmoulins, not his mother, was on hand with Frank Barber when Miss Morris came in for Johnson's blessing.” He then speculations on the reasons for Boswell's error, suggesting that “His unfamiliarity with John, and the earlier frequency with which he had written “Mrs.’ Desmoulins, may explain a lapsus calami.” He concludes, “It is extraordinary that the general field of Johnsonian scholarship should have overlooked the sheer improbability . . . of having a woman . . . in the grim intimacy of the dying Johnson's chamber.”
  1958. Gordon Turnbull, “Samuel Johnson's Shakespearean Exit: Emendation and Amendment,” in Editing Lives, ed. Jesse G. Swan (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2014), pp. 93–105. <--4/18/14-->
  1959. James Grantham Turner, “‘Illustrious Depravity’ and the Erotic Sublime,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 2 (1989): 1–38.
  1960. Katherine Turner, “The ‘Link of Transition’: Samuel Johnson and the Victorians,” in The Victorians and the Eighteenth Century: Reassessing the Tradition, ed. Francis O'Gorman and Katherine Turner (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004), pp. 119–43.
  1961. Nadia Tscherny, “Reynolds's Streatham Portraits and the Art of Intimate Biography,” The Burlington Magazine 128 (Jan. 1986): 4–11.
  1962. Nadia Tscherny, “Likeness in Early Romantic Portraiture,” Art Journal 46 (Fall 1987): 193–99.
  1963. Stephen Tumim, “A Bicentenary,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1991): 8–18. On Boswell's Life of Johnson.
  1964. Stephen Tumim, “An Aspect of Dr Johnson,” The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 18–23.
  1965. Eleanor Ty, “Cowper's Connoisseur 138 and Samuel Johnson,” N&Q 33, no. 1 (March 1986): 63–64.
  1966. Pratibha Tyagi, “Dr. Johnson's Criticism of Shakespeare,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 85–95.
  1967. Jenny Uglow, “Jenny Uglow on Dr Johnson (1709–1784): Postcard Biographies from the National Portrait Gallery,” The Independent, 30 Nov. 1997, p. 37. Brief biography commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery to accompany the 1756 Reynolds portrait.
  1968. Jenny S. Uglow, Dr Johnson, His Club and Other Friends (London: National Portrait Gallery Publications, 1998).
    An illustrated volume in the NPG Character Sketches series, showing portraits (some in color) of Johnson and his circle.
  1969. Robert W. Uphaus, “Cornelia Knight's Dinarbas: A Sequel to Rasselas,” Philological Quarterly 65, no. 4 (Fall 1986): 433–46.
  1970. Robert W. Uphaus, “The Fear of Fiction,” in Man, God, and Nature in the Enlightenment, ed. Donald C. Mell, Jr., Theodore E. D. Braun, and Lucia M. Palmer (East Lansing, MI: Colleagues Press, 1988), pp. 183–90.
  1971. Hans Utz, “A Genevan's Journey to the Hebrides in 1807: An Anti-Johnsonian Venture,” Studies in Scottish Literature, 27 (1992): 47–71.
  1972. Kevin P. Van Anglen, “‘The Tories, We . . .’: Samuel Johnson and Unitarian Boston,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 75–98.
  1973. Geneviève Van de Merghel, “Brute compassion: The Ambivalent Growth of Sympathy for Animals in English Literature and Culture, 1671–1831,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Irvine, 2005. Pp. viii + 223. Not seen.
  1974. Richard Kenneth Van Dyke, “Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland and the Limits of Post/Modernism,” chapter 3 of “Traces of Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Travel Writing and the Reproduction of Knowledge(s),” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 9 (March 2002): 3057A. Univ. of Rhode Island. Not seen.
  1975. Mary M. Van Tassel, “Johnson's Elephant: The Reader of The Rambler,” SEL 28, no. 3 (Summer 1988): 461–69.
  1976. [Add to item 4:275] John A. Vance, ed., Boswell's “Life of Johnson”: New Questions, New Answers (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1985). Reviews:
  1977. [Add to item 11/9:88] John A. Vance, Samuel Johnson and the Sense of History (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1985). Reviews:
  1978. John A. Vance, “Samuel Johnson and Thomas Warton,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 9, no. 2 (Spring 1986): 95–111.
  1979. John A. Vance, “Johnson and Hume: Of Like Historical Minds,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 15 (1986): 241–56.
  1980. John A. Vance, “Johnson's Historical Reviews,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 63–84.
  1981. John A. Vance, “Boswell After 200 Years: A Review Essay,” South Atlantic Review 58, no. 1 (Jan. 1993): 101–9.
  1982. David Vancil, “Some Observations about the Samuel Johnson Miniature Dictionaries in the Cordell Collection,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 167–78. Not seen.
  1983. Sara B. Varhus, “The ‘Solitary Philosopher’ and ‘Nature's Favourite’: Gender and Identity in the Rambler,” in Gender, Culture, and the Arts: Women, the Arts, and Society, ed. Ronald Dotterer and Susan Bowers (Selinsgrove, Penna.: Susquehanna Univ. Press, 1993), pp. 61–73.
  1984. Andrew Varney, “Johnson's Juvenalian Satire on London: A Different Emphasis,” Review of English Studies 40, no. 158 (May 1989): 202–14.
  1985. Anthony Vaughn, “Strangled with a Bowstring: A Clear Case of Character Assassination,” The New Rambler C:23 (1982), 21–22.
  1986. Greg Veitch, “Johnson and the Industrial Revolution,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 3 (1999): 68–79.
  1987. David Francis Venturo, “Johnson the Poet,” Dissertation Abstracts International 47, no. 6 (Dec. 1986): 2172A. Not seen.
  1988. David F. Venturo, “The Poetics of Samuel Johnson's Epitaphs and Elegies and ‘On the Death of Dr. Robert Levet,’” Studies in Philology 85, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 73–91.
  1989. David F. Venturo, “Adjusting the Accents: Samuel Johnson's Prosody in Theory and Practice,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 171–87.
  1990. David F. Venturo, Johnson the Poet: The Poetic Career of Samuel Johnson (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1999). Pp. 335.
    The most thorough and authoritative study of Johnson's poetry, surveying both the major and minor poems, in English, Latin, and Greek.
    Reviews:
  1991. David F. Venturo, “Formal Verse Imitation and the Rhetorical Principles of Imitation in the Neo-Latin Poetry of Samuel Johnson,” Studies in the Literary Imagination 33, no. 2 (Fall 2000), 71–86.
  1992. David F. Venturo, “Samuel Johnson, London and The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in A Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry, ed. Christine Gerrard (Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2006), pp. 252–64. Not seen.
  1993. David F. Venturo, “Fideism, the Antisublime, and the Faithful Imagination in Rasselas, in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 95–111.
    Not seen???
  1994. Blakey Vermeule, The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2000), chapter 5 (“The Kindness of Strangers: Johnson's Life of Savage and the Culture of Altruism”), pp. 119–53.
  1995. Arthur Versluis, “From Transcendentalism to Universal Religion: Samuel Johnson's Orientalism,” American Transcendental Quarterly 5, no. 2 (June 1991): 109–23.
  1996. Brian Vickers, “Samuel Johnson Biographies,” TLS 5565 (27 Nov. 2009): 6.
    A follow-up letter to the editor on Jackson's review of Martin's biography of Johnson.
  1997. Christopher Stephen Vilmar, “Samuel Johnson and the Chronotope of Satire,” Dissertation Abstracts International 66, no. 11 (May 2006): 4035A. Emory University. Not seen.
  1998. Ole-Jacob Vindedal, “En bedre mann,” Vagant 2 (2000): 45–49. In Norwegian.
  1999. Jean Viviès, English Travel Narratives in the Eighteenth Century: Exploring Genres, trans. Claire Davison (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002), chapter 1 (“James Boswell and Samuel Johnson”), pp. 32–53.
  2000. Jean Viviès, “Changing Places, or: Johnson Boswellised,” in Mapping the Self: Space, Identity, Discourse in British Auto/Biography, ed. Frederic Regard (Saint-Etienne: Université de Saint-Etienne, 2003), pp. 157–70. Not seen.
  2001. Catharina Maria de Vries, In the Tracks of a Lexicographer: Secondary Documentation in Samuel Johnson's “Dictionary of the English Language” (1755) (Leiden: Led, 1994).
  2002. Éve-Marie Wagner, “Les ‘Johnsoniana’ de Mrs Thrale, devenue Mrs Piozzi,” in L'Anecdote: Actes du colloque de Clermont-Ferrand (1988), ed. Alain Montandon (Clermont-Ferrand: Association des publications de la Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines de l'Université Blaise-Pascal, 1990): nouvelle série, fascicule 31, pp. 227–42.
  2003. Magdi Wahba, ed., Samuel Johnson: Commemorative Lectures: Delivered at Pembroke College, Oxford (Beirut: Librairie du Liban, 1986). Reviews:
  2004. John Wain, “Birthplace Museum, Lichfield, Staffordshire and 17 Gough Square, London EC4,” in Writers and Their Houses, ed. Kate Marsh (London: Hamish Hamilton, 1993), pp. 225–37.
  2005. John Wain, Johnson is Leaving: A Monodrama (London: Pisces Press, 1994).
  2006. John Wain, Samuel Johnson revised ed. (London: Papermac, 1988).
  2007. Mary Waldron, “Mentors Old and New; Samuel Johnson and Hannah More,” The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 29–37.
  2008. Tara Ghoshal Wallace, “‘Guarded with Fragments’: Body and Discourse in Rasselas,” South Central Review 9, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 31–45.
  2009. Eric C. Walker, “Charlotte Lennox and the Collier Sisters: Two New Johnson Letters,” Studies in Philology 95, no. 3 (Summer 1998): 320–32.
  2010. Keith Walker, “Some Notes on the Treatment of Dryden in Johnson's Dictionary,” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 106–9.
  2011. Robert G. Walker, “Boswell's Use of ‘Ogden on Prayer’ in Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 19 (2009): 53–68.
    References to Samuel Ogden's Sermons on the Efficacy of Prayer and Intercession were removed from the published Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, but Walker calls it “one of the most important in the aesthetic shaping of the work.”
  2012. Marcus Walsh, “Samuel Johnson on Poetic Lice and Fleas,” N&Q 36, no. 4 (Dec. 1989): 470.
  2013. Sheilagh Walsh, “Johnson as a Critic of Richardson,” The New Rambler E:8 (2004–5): 35–45.
  2014. Orrin N. C. Wang, “The Politics of Aphasia in Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” Criticism: A Quarterly for Literature and the Arts 36, no. 1 (Winter 1994): 73–100.
  2015. John K. Ward, “Samuel Johnson: ‘A Poor Diseased Infant, Almost Blind,’” The New Rambler E:6 (2002–3): 51–60.
  2016. William C. Waterhouse, “The Louse Is Better: Heinsius and Johnson,” N&Q 41, no. 2 (June 1994): 199.
  2017. William C. Waterhouse, “A Source for Johnson's ‘Malim cum Scaligero errare,’” N&Q 50, no. 2 (June 2003): 222–23.
  2018. Susan Watkins, “‘My Dear Dr. Johnson’”: The Link between Jane Austen and Dr. Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler, D:10 (1994–95), 14–21.
  2019. George Watson, The Literary Critics: A Study of English Descriptive Criticism (London: Hogarth Press, 1986), chapter 2, pp. 75–101.
  2020. Carol Watts, “Lunacy in the Cosmopolis (1759): Expansion and Imperial Recoil,” chapter 1 (pp. 28–64) of The Cultural Work of Empire: The Seven Years' War and the Imagining of the Shandean State (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press, 2007).
    A reading of the “cultural work” that accompanied Britain's expanding empire during the Seven Years' War. Chapter 1 considers three works of 1759: Voltaire's Candide, Rasselas, and the first two volumes of Tristram Shandy.
  2021. Martin Wechselblatt, “On the Authority of Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 12 (June 1992): 4342A. Cornell University. Not seen.
  2022. Martin Wechselblatt, “Finding Mr. Boswell: Rhetorical Authority and National Identity in Johnson's A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” ELH 60, no. 1 (Spring 1993): 117–48.
  2023. Martin Wechselblatt, “The Pathos of Example: Professionalism and Colonialization in Johnson's Preface to the Dictionary,” The Yale Journal of Criticism 9, no. 2 (1996): 381–403.
  2024. Martin Wechselblatt, Bad Behavior: Samuel Johnson and Modern Cultural Authority (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 1998). Reviews:
  2025. David M. Weed, “Sexual Positions: Men of Pleasure, Economy, and Dignity in Boswell's London Journal,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 31, no. 2 (Winter 1997–98), 215–34.
  2026. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson's London and Juvenal's Third Satire: The Country as ‘Ironic’ Norm,” in Eighteenth-Century Satire: Essays on Text and Context from Dryden to Peter Pindar (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ Press, 1988), pp. 164–71. Reprints item 14:197. Reprinted in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 92–104.
  2027. Howard D. Weinbrot, “No ‘Mock Debate’: Questions and Answers in The Vanity of Human Wishes,” in Eighteenth-Century Satire: Essays on Text and Context from Dryden to Peter Pindar (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ Press, 1988), pp. 172–85. Reprints item 14:218. Reprinted in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 105–24.
  2028. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Samuel Johnson, Percival Stockdale, and Brick-Bats from Grubstreet: Some Later Response to the Lives of the Poets,” Huntington Library Quarterly 56, no. 2 (Spring 1993): 105–34. Reprinted in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 241–69.
  2029. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Censoring Johnson in France: Johnson and Suard on Voltaire: A New Document,” Review of English Studies 45, no. 178 (May 1994): 230–33.
  2030. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson, Jacobitism, and the Historiography of Nostalgia,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 163–212.
    Weinbrot's first contribution on Johnson's politics, in response to Clark and Erskine-Hill.
  2031. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Who Said He Was a Jacobite Hero?: The Political Genealogy of Johnson's Charles of Sweden,” Philological Quarterly 75, no. 4 (Fall 1996): 411–50.
    Further consideration of Johnson's politics, focusing on the interpretation of the passage in The Vanity of Human Wishes about Charles XII of Sweden.
  2032. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson and Jacobitism Redux: Evidence, Interpretation, and Intellectual History,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 89–125.
    Weinbrot argues against Clark and Erskine-Hill, insisting that Johnson was not a Jacobite.
  2033. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson's Poetry,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 34–50. Reprinted as “The Poetry of Samuel Johnson” in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 72–91.
  2034. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson, Jacobitism, and Swedish Charles: The Vanity of Human Wishes and Scholarly Method,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 945–81.
  2035. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Samuel Johnson and the Domestic Metaphor,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 127–63. Reprinted in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 146–75.
  2036. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson and the Jacobite Truffles,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 273–90.
    A late entry in the argument over Johnson's putative Jacobitism.
  2037. Howard Weinbrot, “The Politics of Samuel Johnson and the Johnson of Politics: An Innocent Looks at a Controversy,” 1650–1850 8 (2003): 3–26.
  2038. Howard D. Weinbrot, “What Johnson's Illustrative Quotations Illustrate: Language and Viewpoint in the Dictionary,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 42–60. Reprinted in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 53–71.
  2039. Howard D. Weinbrot, Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005). Pp. 417. Sixteen essays, most previously published, though some reworked for this volume. Reviews:
  2040. Howard D. Weinbrot, “The Gensis of a Controversy: The Politics of Johnson and the Johnson of Politics,” in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 301–11.
  2041. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson, Oxford, Oaths, and Historical Evidence,” in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 312–39.
  2042. Howard D. Weinbrot, “The Vanity of Human Wishes Part I: Who Said He Was a Jacobite Hero? The Political Genealogy of Johnson's Charles of Sweden,” in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 340–76.
  2043. Howard D. Weinbrot, “The Vanity of Human WishesPart II: Reading Charles of Sweden in the Poem, Reading Johnson's Politics,” in Aspects of Samuel Johnson: Essays on His Arts, Mind, Afterlife, and Politics (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2005), pp. 377–400.
  2044. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Hodge Lives: Percival Stockdale, Samuel Johnson, and the Reclamation of a Ninth Life,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 31–34.
    On Stockdale's elegy to SJ's cat Hodge, reprinted here, with evidence for Hodge's dates. Weinbrot adds to “the literature of the domestic feline.”
  2045. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Samuel Johnson: Process, Progress, and the Beatus Ille,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 7–17.
    The address to the Johnsonians, Chicago, 19 September 2008. Weinbrot acknowledges the validity of many claims that Johnson was deeply unhappy, but adds, “his demonstrable troubles were the part and not the whole. . . . Except for traumatic times, and often with the help of the Thrales, Johnson generally could keep those troubles more or less and bay and produce literature of astounding variety, quality, and quantity.”
  2046. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson and the Modern: The Forward Face of Janus,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 55–72.
    Not seen???
  2047. Howard D. Weinbrot, “The Thirtieth of January Sermon: Swift, Johnson, Sterne, and the Evolution of Culture: The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies James L. Clifford Lecture, 2008,” Eighteenth-Century Life 34, no. 1 (Winter 2010): 29–55.
  2048. Howard D. Weinbrot, “Samuel Johnson and Jacobites,” letter to the editor, TLS 5791 (28 March 2014): 6.
    Weinbrot responds to J. C. D. Clark's review of his Literature, Religion, and the Evolution of Culture, 1660–1780, accusing Clark of errors and of nursing a grudge over the long-running debate over Johnson as Jacobite.
  2049. Joel Weinsheimer, “Fiction and the Force of Example,” in The Idea of the Novel in the Eighteenth Century, ed. Robert W. Uphaus (East Lansing: Colleagues Press, 1988), pp. 1–19.
  2050. Alan Wells, “Dr. Johnson's Morphic Guide to Physiks,” New Scientist 137, no. 1859 (6 Feb. 1993): 46–47.
  2051. Katherine N. West, “The Treatment of Johnson's Shakespeare by Modern Editors: The Case of Henry V,” Lumen 13 (1994): 179–86.
  2052. T. F. Wharton, Samuel Johnson and the Theme of Hope (New York: St. Martin's, 1984). Reviews:
  2053. T. F. Wharton, “Johnson, Authorship, and Hope,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 150–66.
  2054. David Wheeler, “Crosscurrents in Literary Criticism, 1750–1790: Samuel Johnson and Joseph Warton,” South Central Review 4, no. 1 (Spring 1987): 24–42.
  2055. David Wheeler, ed., Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987). Reviews:
  2056. Elizabeth Wheeler, “Great Burke and Poor Boswell: Carlyle and the Historian's Task,” Victorian Newsletter 70 (Fall 1986): 28–31.
  2057. Roxann Wheeler, “‘My Savage,’ ‘My Man’: Color, Gender, and Nation in Eighteenth-Century British Narratives,” Dissertation Abstracts International 56, no. 9 (March 1996): 3599A. Not seen.
  2058. Brian Douglas White, “Samuel Johnson's ‘Preface to the Preceptor’ and its Context,” M.A. Thesis, Arizona State University, 1994. Not seen.
  2059. Marilyn Whitlock, “The Elusiveness of Johnsonian Friendship,” M.A. Thesis, California State University, Hayward, 1990. Not seen.
  2060. Reed Whittemore, Pure Lives: The Early Biographers (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1988): chapter 5 (“Samuel Johnson”), pp. 101–22; chapter 6 (“—And the Boswell Connection”), pp. 123–30; Appendix (“Johnson on Biography”), pp. 147–50.
  2061. Reed Whittemore, “Poetry: Captured Again — But Died on the Way to the Zoo,” Sewanee Review 106, no. 1 (1998): 172–76.
  2062. Matthew Farr Wickman, “The Allure of the Improbable: Evidence and Romance in the Scottish Highlands, 1746–1790,” Dissertation Abstracts International 61, no. 6 (Dec. 2000): 2316A. Univ. of California Los Angeles. Not seen.
  2063. Lance Elliott Wilcox, “Interwoven Lives: The Letters of Samuel Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International, 50, no. 9 (March 1990): 2914A. Not seen.
  2064. Lance E. Wilcox, “Edifying the Young Dog: Johnson's Letters to Boswell,” in Sent as a Gift: Eight Correspondences from the Eighteenth Century, ed. Alan T. McKenzie (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1993), pp. 129–49.
  2065. Lance Wilcox, “The Religious Psychology of Samuel Johnson,” Ultimate Reality and Meaning 21, no. 3 (Sept. 1998): 160–76.
  2066. Lance Wilcox, “Healing the Lacerated Mind: Samuel Johnson's Strategies of Consolation,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 7 (2002): 193–208.
  2067. Kate Wild, “Ludicrous Exaggerations and Colloquial Licenses: ‘Prescriptive’ Labels in Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language,” in “Cunning Passages, Contrived Corridors”: Unexpected Essays in the History of Lexicography, ed. Michael Adams (Monza, Italy: Polimetrica, 2010), pp. 165–85.
  2068. Mark Edwin Wildermuth, “Energy and Elegance: The Style and Context of Samuel Johnson's Moral Prose,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 5 (Nov. 1991): 1755A. University of Wisconsin, Madison. Not seen.
  2069. Mark E. Wildermuth, “Johnson's Prose Style: Blending Energy and Elegance in The Rambler,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 205–36.
  2070. Mark E. Wildermuth, “Samuel Johnson and the Aesthetics of Complex Dynamics,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 48, no. 1 (Spring 2007): 45–60.
    Wildermuth works “in the wake of postmodernism, to contextualize Johnson's double focus on order and disorder, on universal global norms and localized deviance — at least with particular regard to his literary criticism and lexicography, wherein we find his most lucid discussion of an uncertainty principle informing his epistemology and aesthetics. Within the context of eighteenth-century and postmodern conceptions of complex dynamic systems, we can see that Johnson is neither a dogmatist nor a nihilist, but is instead an early modern chaologist, a student of chaos whose response to the perturbations introduced by science and philosophy in the eighteenth century lead him to describe in his aesthetics a complex mimetic system tracing emergent structures in the field of literary criticism implicated by the interplay between classical tradition and the new empirical skepticism.”
  2071. Amy Wilentz, “Mr. Los Angeles, Samuel Johnson,” Los Angeles Times, 7 June 2009, p. A28.
    “Johnson, I concluded, could have lived happily in Los Angeles. . . . Johnson's dictionary was his era's Wikipedia, its Google, and Johnson himself was the 18th century equivalent of a blogger.”
  2072. Carolyn D. Williams, “Elizabeth Carter and Catherine Talbot: Rational Piety in The Rambler,” The New Rambler, E:4 (2000–1): 27–38.
  2073. Nicholas Williams, “The Discourse of Madness: Samuel Johnson's ‘Life of Collins,’” Eighteenth-Century Life, 14, no. 2 (May 1990): 18–28.
  2074. Walter Jon Williams, “Incarnation Day,” Escape from Earth: New Adventures in Space, ed. Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois (Garden City, N.Y.: Science Fiction Book Club, 2006). Reprinted in The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Fourth Annual Collection, ed. Gardner Dozois (New York: St. Martin's Griffin, 2007). ???
    A short story in which SJ figures. Not seen.
  2075. Jack C. Wills, “The Theme of Education and Communication in Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” The Bulletin of the West Virginia Association of College English Teachers 11 (Fall 1989): 82–92.
  2076. A. N. Wilson, “A Difficult Time for Doctor Johnson,” The Daily Telegraph, 28 December 2000, p. 33. On Christmas.
  2077. Bee Wilson, “Defining Tastes,” The New Statesman 12, no. 500 (9 April 1999): 40–41. On definitions of foods in the Dictionary.
  2078. Bee Wilson, “Conspicuous Consumption,” The New Statesman 12, no. 551 (19 April 1999): 42–43. On Johnson's eating habits and table manners.
  2079. G. A. Wilson and J. G. Ravin, “Blinking Sam: The Ocular Afflictions of Dr Samuel Johnson,” Archives of Ophthalmology 122, no. 9 (Sept. 2004): 1370–74.
  2080. Ross Wilson, “The Enigma of Port and Dr. Johnson,” The New Rambler C:25 (1984): 30–32.
  2081. Timothy Wilson-Smith, Samuel Johnson (London: Haus, 2004). Pp. 160. Reviews
  2082. John Wiltshire, Samuel Johnson in the Medical World: The Doctor and the Patient (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991). Reviews:
  2083. John Wiltshire, “The Doctor and the Patient: A Reply to S. Rousseau,” Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 29, no. 3 (July 1993): 268.
  2084. John Wiltshire, “Samuel Johnson in the Medical World,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2 (1997): 17–23.
  2085. John Wiltshire, “‘From China to Peru’: Johnson in the Traveled World,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 209–23.
  2086. John Wiltshire, “All the Dear Burneys, Little and Great,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 2, no. 2 (1998): 15–24.
  2087. John Wiltshire, “In Bed with Boswell and Johnson,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 3 (1999): 27–36.
  2088. John Wiltshire, “Johnson and Garrick: The Really Impossible Friendship,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 4 (2000): 31–36.
  2089. John Wiltshire, “Johnson and Garrick: The Really Impossible Friendship (Part II),” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 5 (2001): 13–19.
  2090. John Wiltshire, Jane Austen's “Dear Dr. Johnson”: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture, 2000 (Melbourne: The Johnson Society of Australia/Vagabond Press, 2001).
  2091. John Wiltshire, “Fanny Burney, Boswell and Johnson,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 10 (Aug. 2008): 55–65.
    Not seen.
  2092. A. R. Winnett, “The Problem of Evil in the 18th Century: Dr. Johnson and Soame Jenyns,” New Rambler D:3 (1987–1988): 46–47.
  2093. Catherine A. Witek, “Samuel Johnson's Alchemy: Fusing Aristotelian Invention into Eighteenth Century Rhetoric,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53, no. 4 (Oct. 1992): 1169A. University of Illinois, Chicago. Not seen.
  2094. Katherine Witek, “The Rhetoric of Smith, Boswell and Johnson: Creating the Modern Icon,” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 24, nos. 3–4 (Summer–Fall 1994): 53–70.
  2095. Manfred Wolf, “The Aphorism,” Etc. 51 (Winter 1994–95), 432–39.
  2096. Douglas Wollen, “Dr Johnson in Wesley's Letters and Journals,” The New Rambler D:4 (1988–89), 3–5.
  2097. Peter Womack, “Secularizing King Lear: Shakespeare, Tate, and the Sacred,” Shakespeare Survey: An Annual Survey of Shakespearean Studies and Production 55 (2002): 96–105. Not seen.
  2098. David Womersley, “Johnson and the Past Tense,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1991): 19–28.
  2099. Nigel Wood, “Johnson's Revisions to His Dictionary,” The New Rambler D:3 (1987–88), 23–28.
  2100. Nigel Wood, ed., Dr. Johnson and Fanny Burney (Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1989). “Selection based on the 1912 edition of Chauncey Brewster Tinker.”
  2101. Nigel Wood, “‘The Tract and Tenor of the Sentence’: Conversing, Connection, and Johnson's Dictionary,” Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 110–27.
  2102. James Woodall, “Travel: A Taste of Scotch and the Rocks: James Woodall Follows Johnson and Boswell to the West Coast,” The Daily Telegraph, 7 Nov. 1992, p. 127.
  2103. Thomas M. Woodman, A Preface to Samuel Johnson (London: Longman, 1993). Reviews:
  2104. Martha Woodmansee, “On the Author Effect: Recovering Collectivity,” Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal 10, no. 2 (1992): 279–92.
  2105. Branson Lee Woodward, Jr., “Rhetorical Dimensions of Samuel Johnson's Rambler,” Dissertation Abstracts International 44, no. 1 (1983), 179A. Not seen.
  2106. H. R. Woudhuysen, ed., Samuel Johnson on Shakespeare (London: Penguin Books, 1989).
  2107. H. R. Woudhuysen, “Dr. Johnson's Books,” TLS, 6 July 1990, p. 729.
  2108. H. R. Woudhuysen, “Arguing with Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 69–73.
  2109. James F. Woodruff, “The Background and Significance of the Rambler's Format,” Publishing History 4 (1978), 113–33.
  2110. James F. Woodruff, “Two More Johnson Pieces in the Universal Chronicle?,” The New Rambler E:1 (1997–98), 59–70.
  2111. Nicole M. Wright, “‘A More Exact Purity’: Legal Authority and Conspicuous Amalgamation in Early Modern English Law Guides and the Oxford Law Lectures of Sir Robert Chambers and Samuel Johnson,” University of Toronto Quarterly: A Canadian Journal of the Humanities 82, no. 4 (Fall 2013): 864–88.
  2112. Jonathan Yardley, “Amazingly Enough, the First Great Dictionary was Basically the Work of One Man,” The Washington Post, 13 Nov. 2005, p. T5.
  2113. William Paul Yarrow, “‘Casts a Kind of Glory Round It’: Metaphor and the Life of Johnson,” Boswell: Citizen of the World, Man of Letters, ed. Irma S. Lustig (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1995), pp. 158–83.
  2114. Myron D. Yeager, “Hawkins's The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., and Modern Biographers,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 89–98.
  2115. Gary Ramsey Young, “The Controversy Surrounding Samuel Johnson's Late Conversion,” Dissertation Abstracts International 47, no. 3 (Sept. 1986): 918A. Not seen.
  2116. Kai Kin Yung, Samuel Johnson, 1709–1784: A Bicentenary Exhibition (Manchester: Manchester Univ. Press, 1984). Reviews:
  2117. Charles Zarobila, “Boswell and Johnson at Blithedale: A Source for Hawthorne's Romance,” Nathaniel Hawthorne Review 14, no. 1 (Spring 1988): 6–9.
  2118. Katie Zezima, “A Samuel Johnson Trove Goes to Harvard's Library,” New York Times, 18 March 2004, p. E3. On the Hyde Collection's move to the Houghton.
  2119. Robert Ziegler, “Recent Books on Johnson and Boswell,” Papers on Language & Literature 28, no. 4 (Fall 1992): 457–75.
  2120. Linda Zionkowski, “Territorial Disputes in the Republic of Letters: Canon Formation and the Literary Profession,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 31, no. 1 (Spring 1990): 3–22.
  2121. Linda Zionkowski, Men's Work: Gender, Class, and the Professionalization of Poetry, 1660–1784 (New York: Palgrave, 2001), chapter 5 (“‘I Also Am a Man’: Johnson's Lives and the Gender of the Poet,” pp. 171–203). Pp. viii + 279.